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Time Warner to go to Blue Ray on all its videos!


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I don't know about anyone else but the decision by Time Warner to go Blu Ray on all its videos in future is a crippling blow to my collection.. I cannot and will not replace my collection with all new DVD's just because they can perform this outrage. Hopefully, some manufacturer will come up with a dual player that will play both formats for those folks like me who have a pretty large DVD collection. What do you guys think?

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The BDP-S1 Blu-ray Disc home player from Sony will play both standard DVD discs and the Blu-Ray discs.

 

It will be awhile before the studios go with Blu-Ray for their classic libraries as it requires remastering.

 

However, the Blu-Ray discs hold more information than the standard DVD discs and so there will likely be more extras available on box sets and stand alones in the future.

 

In the meantime, no one has to throw out their current DVD library and start from scratch.

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I don't know about anyone else but the decision by Time Warner to go Blu Ray on all its videos in future is a crippling blow to my collection.. I cannot and will not replace my collection with all new DVD's just because they can perform this outrage. Hopefully, some manufacturer will come up with a dual player that will play both formats for those folks like me who have a pretty large DVD collection. What do you guys think?

 

It's not an "outrage"; that there are two competing formats was, and is, no secret, and early adopters of new technologies/formats frequently get burned, if for no other reason than the devices they buy are quickly superseded by more elaborate and better-performing units, usually sold at cheaper prices.

 

You have no one to blame but yourself.

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I don't know about anyone else but the decision by Time Warner to go Blu Ray on all its videos in future is a crippling blow to my collection.. I cannot and will not replace my collection with all new DVD's just because they can perform this outrage>

 

I didn't realize it upon first responding to your post but after reading CSJ's post, I realized that, perhaps, your library consists mainly of the HD-DVDs and that is why you are so up in arms.

 

You might look around the web, LG makes a player that play both Blu-Ray and HD-DVDs.

 

In the meantime, those who have not yet made the leap and have libraries of standard def DVDs, can rest a little easier.

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First off, I don't see what Warner Bros. did as an outrage. What most people don't know here, probably, is that there is a format war with regards to high definition video players and discs. It comes down to two systems, Blu-ray and HD-DVD (remember the days of the VHS vs. Betamax war?). The battle has been going on for over a year and consumers who have not bought into one format are afraid they will pick the one that will be obsolete. And that means that high def players are not being adopted as well as they should be.

 

The format wars also consisted of studios squaring off against each other. On the Blu-ray side, there was Disney, Sony, Fox, Lionsgate, MGM, and maybe one or two others I can't recall at the moment. On the HD DVD side, there was Universal. For awhile, Paramount offered products to both sides. Warner Bros. did likewise.

 

Paramount and DreamWorks sold out for $150 million to go HD DVD exclusively. (Verified by Viacom executives (Viacom owns Paramount) in a NY Times article.)

 

Warners was the last holdout and continued to be neutral.

 

Meanewhile, the wars continued, not just between the formats but also between the fans of each system (reading the forums, if the fans had guns, it would be a bloody battlefield).

 

Towards the last quarter of 2007, realizing that the format war was stopping new consumers from getting into the high def market, which the industry definitely needs them to do, Warner Bros. made public announcements that it was likely to choose one format over another, and were looking at a number of things including sales. Sales figures for all of 2007 favored Blu-ray with twice as many discs sold.

 

Last Friday, a few days before the consumer electronics show in Vegas was to begin, Warner Bros. announced their decision. They were going exclusively Blu-ray. In addition to superior numbers in disc sales (every single month had Blu-ray winning by a substantial amount), it was the only logical step for them to bring the format war to a close. If they had gone HD DVD, it would only have split the studios evenly between the two formats and the war would have gone on and on.. Remember, you would have to buy two different machines or a combination player to play both both formats. However, by going Blu-ray, they basically brought the war to an end. Blu-ray now has 70% of high def output on their side. HD DVD is left with Paramount (who have an 18-month contract to support HD DVD), DreamWorks (same deal), and Universal. And, unfortunately, with HD DVD fans who feel betrayed by Warner Bros. but who would have felt no regret for Blu-ray supporters if the decision had gone the other way.

 

Warner performed no outrage. Supporting two formats was costly, mistakes would happen, and the most important thing, the high defnition format was not being adopted by a mass audience, which could spell the end for both formats if not resolved as soon as possible.

 

From the official Warner Bros. release about the matter:

""The window of opportunity for high-definition DVD could be missed if format confusion continues to linger. We believe that exclusively distributing in Blu-ray will further the potential for mass market success and ultimately benefit retailers, producers, and most importantly, consumers.

....A two-format landscape has led to consumer confusion and indifference toward high definition, which has kept the technology from reaching mass adoption and becoming the important revenue stream that it can be for the industry...Consumers have clearly chosen Blu-ray, and we believe that recognizing this preference is the right step in making this great home entertainment experience accessible to the widest possible audience."

 

When Paramount Studios decided to go with HD DVD, they completely cut off making any Blu-ray discs they had already taken advance orders from retailers on. They also told retailers to ship back to them new Blu-ray releases that had just gone out.

 

Warner Bros., on the other hand, says they will produce in both formats until May of 2008 to ease the transition period for HD DVD fans and to fulfill their contracts.

 

Since the announcement, HBO and New Line have also said they will go Blu-ray, but this is not unexpected because of their connection to Warner Bros.

 

The BDA group (Blu-ray) is even looking at possible ways whereby they can help HD DVD (Toshiba) purchasers make the transition to Blu-ray a little easier. Some options that they are considering are discounts to Blu-ray players or swapping Blu-ray discs for the same title they have on HD DVD.

 

In the meantime, Blu-ray fans and even many HD DVD supporters know the battle is useless and the war is over. HD DVD buyers are switching to Blu-ray, but still some hold out. Those that are switching join Blu-ray fans in asking Paramount, DreamWorks, and Universal to end the war and go Blu-ray.

 

Paramount has stated recently they support HD DVD still, but it has been reported there is an out-clause in their contract with Toshiba that says if Warner were to go exclusively Blu-ray (which it did), they could switch (and return a portion of the money, I guess). Rumors are that both Paramount and DreamWorks are thinking about it. The one definite unknown is Universal, saying only "No comment" to questions of going Blu-ray or supporting HD DVD further. Again, insiders in the industry are stating that Universal is contemplating going Blu-ray. This only makes sense because to stay under HD DVD is a losing proposition. Comparing sales on Amazon for the top 100 Blu-ray discs vs. the top 100 HD DVD discs shows that since Friday HD DVD has plunged from about 800th place straight down to about 2,000th place on their sales chart for overall DVD sales (this includes standard DVDs and high def discs). Blu-ray's top 100 stays in the top 500 of all DVDs sold.

 

There has been much coverage of this in the media. Reports are that the Blu-ray exhibit at the CES convention in Vegas is packing people in, while the HD DVD exhibit is practically a ghost town. The CES show has also had many DVD player manufacturers coming in with a whole slew of Blu-ray players and no new HD DVD players, except a combo player or two. eBay has had a sudden rush of people selling their HD DVD players. And reports say that people are returning HD DVD players they got or bought for Christmas to stores. Toshiba says that retailers are supportive of HD DVD still, but other reports state differently:

 

Target: "Until it settles completely I think we're going to continue to see consumers sitting on the sidelines."

 

Wal-Mart: "It would be our hope that by this Christmas there would be a clearer choice for the customer, instead of battling back and forth."

 

But with Warner Bros. getting behind Blu-ray, and hopefully ending the format war, the retailers say:

 

Circuit City: the decision makes it "a lot easier to see the likelihood that we get to one format, and it makes it easier for us as retailers to help push it to that one format."

 

Wal-Mart: "If we were able to have one united message and say: 'Here's high definition TV, here's a high definition DVD, here's the medium to play on it,' it's a much cleaner story to customers that the industry can push, that every retailer can push and the customer goes, 'OK I get it."'

 

Anyway, that is the whole thing in a nutshell.

 

I support studios going Blu-ray, end the war, and start promoting it to the mass consumer. High def discs are woinderful. You may never be able to go back to the look of standard DVDs entirely

(and don't worry, high def players can play your standard DVDs and upconvert them to look almost high def, too.).

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I think DVD collectors have more to worry about when they've used video-compression to make DVDs. This is why DVRs can sometimes produce DVD-R copies that no other player can read - they use a compression-algorithm that no other device can read.

 

I am skeptical that BluRay or HD will be long-lived, however. The Chinese continue to want to use the EVD format standard which ups the optical disk capacity by 4, but they're still mired down in the Sony-Phillips-Western Technology Standards Committees vs. Communist Tienaman Square ideology. Meanwhile, by the time we all have bought several waves of HD and BluRay products, then the Standards Committees will approve the EVD standard.

 

I don't think of this as "planned obsolecense" - it's more like a technological Bataan Death March - force us to buy into one trench, then force us to buy our way out, then force us back into another trench.

 

Someone could get real cynical if they had the long-term view.

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>It's not an "outrage"; that there are two competing formats was, and is, no secret, and early adopters of new technologies/formats frequently get burned,

 

Why are you so rude to people?

 

Do you think blu-ray is the "ultimate" format that will never be superseded?

 

What about 8mm, super8, 16mm, Beta, VHS, VHS-C, 8mm video, mini-disk video, DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD-RW, CD, wire recorders, full-track 1/4-inch reel-to-reel, half-track, quarter-track, cassette, 8-track cassette, mini cassette, etc, etc., etc.

 

Blu-ray is only a temporary format, just like all the others.

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Why are you so rude to people?

 

Do you think blu-ray is the "ultimate" format that will never be superseded?

 

What about 8mm, super8, 16mm, Beta, VHS, VHS-C, 8mm video, mini-disk video, DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD-RW, CD, wire recorders, full-track 1/4-inch reel-to-reel, half-track, quarter-track, cassette, 8-track cassette, mini cassette, etc, etc., etc.

 

Blu-ray is only a temporary format, just like all the others.

 

Rude? No. Butally honest? Yes.

 

Of course optical-disk technology will be superseded, but that's not the issue. As the Betamax-VHS struggle of thirty years ago proved, chosing the losing side in a format war can marginalize someone who's invested a lot of money hardware and software as to the choices they have in buying new films, blank cassettes and technologically superior devices. Even those who bought VHS early had to contend with rapidly evolving technology, with more bells-and-whistles, and equally rapidly dropping prices.

 

Buying into a new technology or format is never a good idea. Period.

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Early Adapters, pay through the nose... That said.....all the formats we have now, Mp3. wave, Apple's AAC, ect, Dvd, HD< & Blu-ray will eventually be superseded by whatever new technology is developed over the next years, However, as the film/movie preservationists have pointed out many times, as we move forward much is lost,, I am thinking both of lost films themselves and the the people who actually were there, and, almost as importantly , the equipment to play edit and do anything with the old media. This premise can be extended to many other things such as old computer hardware, there are millions of computer reels of data siting that no one can access because the machines to play the magnetic memory data tapes are not around any more. Soon there will be millions of vhs tapes laying all over the world with no vcrs to play them on, like the fate of 78rpm records, eventually cd and optical disc will suffer a similar fate... Although it will probably take longer.. All this is not counting what is eventually done with DRM and what effect it has on the hardware. All this is is to say, there is something ,to be said, for the printed page. One can still read a 100+ year old book and one may be able to read the same material digitally 1 year or even a week later after it was digitalized..

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I'm not going to let Ken make more sense here. I blame him for all of this, yes, I do. I know all he's got to do is sit up there, sipping his mai-tai's, dangling his tootsies in the azure blue tides under his palm trees, dreaming up Dos Equis commercials and worrying about pop-tops hidden in the sand. That guy has such a great life - I'm pretty sure it's his "chasing native girls in grass skirts" lifestyle that's led us into this technology pit. He probably thinks, "Ollie's not suffering enough! What can I do to mess with him?" Yup, I'm sure. That's it... wink wink-nudge nudge (face it, Mr. K, you DO make too much sense!)

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Ken, not to worry. Once I perfect my Time-Machine/Stovetop Espresso Maker, we can slip back in front of Ollie's postings and say things about him. He's been intent on preventing my Time Machine's successful implementation because he believes I'll use it to win Ingrid's heart away, and he'll be left with Gene Tierney. Awww, poor fellow... what a terrible blow THAT would be!

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>chosing the losing side in a format war

 

Come on, man. All sides are ?losing sides? in the format wars, because the format wars are constant and ongoing all the time.

 

I don?t know how old you are, but I?m old enough to know this from experience. What people call ?blu-ray? today, and think of as being the new ?ultimate? format, will be laughed at in 5 years or less, just like people now laugh at their old Pong games and the 8-track audio tape players they had installed in their 1974 Plymouths, back in the days when they wore polyester leisure suits and had long sideburns, just as people are now beginning to laugh at VHS and DVD.

 

>Buying into a new technology or format is never a good idea. Period.

 

Oh, so you are still watching your movies at home on B&W 8mm films by Blackhawk or Keystone, with music accompaniment on 78 RPM records?

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Heck I've got both of you beat, I've been staying up late night for 20+ years figuring out ways to make your tech life messed up.....lol I throughly enjoyed Ollies post.. as for your way back machine.... I have the copywrite on that for the next 100 years....lol so There...!!!,,,,,,,LOL

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No one but you seems to say theres a ?losing sides " The point of my point was that all media is eventually going to become obsoliate . The point is to get what will last as long as possible and be as backwards compatible. as possible I don't think any one ever said that Blu ray or any ray, is the ultimate format, some are better then others, So to avoid being on the Losing side you don't buy any new equipment?... and use your old equipment..?,,, So how old is your computer, and how many have you bought to upgrade over the last 10 years or so,, I think this is my 3rd or 4th xp machine.. Alone... and each one was cheaper then the one before it...

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>No one but you seems to say theres a ?losing sides "

 

No, scroll down below and you will see that it was CineSage Jr. who brought up the ?losing side? concept.

 

I merely pointed out to him that all formats change and become obsolete, which is pretty much what you said.

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>Ok sorry no problem,, I stand corrected on anything you didn't say,, sorry to have put words in your mouth..

 

No problem at all.

 

By the way, I?ve got an old IBM state-of-the-art (as we used to call it) Correcting Selectric II typewriter in my garage with extra typing ?elements? (don?t call them ?balls?), two Brother Daisy-Wheel floppy-disk electronic typewriters (remember ?floppy disks??), one old Model III/IV Radio Shack computer (that is in ?like new? condition), and one old Gateway PC that lasted nearly 7 years before it crashed (I just hated to throw it away, so it is in one of my closets). The RS and Brothers still work. The IBM needs a few adjustments.

 

And that doesn?t include my old Olivetti electronic Daisy Wheel typewriter with an LCD screen and memory (which I gave away years ago).

 

Oh... I did have an even older RS Model III, but it crashed back in the late '80s and I threw it away.

 

Oh, I still have my old original Pong machine. Lol.

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Ah I, remember the IBM Selectric II,, I learned to type on one at school,, next to it was a 1900's era, Royal manual typewriter,, I don't have quite the collection of equipment you have, (Wife would let me, even, If I did) I figure by the time I can afford HD tv they're have the specs sorted out and it will be ironed out, My biggest fear is DRM.. But thats another Rant...

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People are not rushing out to upgrade their DVD collection to Blue Ray or HD because DVD are still a perfectly fine medium- unless the prices for Blue Rays disc go drastically down its not going to change any time soon- why would you pay $30 bucks for a movie you can find the same on DVD for $10.00 or less.

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Theres also a bigger audience that hasn't upgraded to HD because they can't afford the HD TV and HD content, so a HD dvd player is not a big deal, I have the surround system , but no HD because I can't afford the HD tv as much as they don't want to admit it as cheap as HD Tv are getting they're pretty expensive for average consumer, There theres no reason to upgrade the dvd collection right away.. by the time folks get to that point the "format wars" will be over and there won't be a issue as to which one to get..

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