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42 minutes ago, LuckyDan said:

That's cool as hell. Ask her though what she remembers of it. I'd love to hear someone who was actually there talk about it. 

Yea,  I will ask her about that.     My financial advisor was also her financial advisor and that is how we meet.   About 12 or so years ago we went out to dinner.    We start talking about things and she just assumes I would be clueless about the music, movies, and T.V. of the 30s - 50s.   E.g.  comments like "well I'm sure you don't know this actor, but when we were on the set filming Honey West,,,"  and I would then tell her thinks I knew.    She was shocked that this much younger man knew anything about that (i.e.  she didn't know that my passion was that era of music, movies, T.V.  of her era).

She gave me a copy of one of her Honey West books signed by Anne Francis.  She had a room in her home dedicated to the books and T.V. show.   Anne and her would see each other from time to time,  but sadly my advisor friend and I were never able to set up a "date" with Anne.    I really wanted to discuss the filming of Bad Day At Black Rock with her,  Robert Ryan, Tracy, etc....   and how it was being the only women on that set.

 

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44 minutes ago, LuckyDan said:

But since you mention "Scarecrow" I found that Beverly's character was named Dotty West. Maybe Anne Francis wasn't available. 

I think the name of Garland's character on S&MK was an homage to country singer Dottie West who was very popular at the time.

Incidentally feminism is not a dirty word. I'm a feminist (thanks to my very out lesbian professors in college).

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6 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yea,  I will ask her about that.     My financial advisor was also her financial advisor and that is how we meet.   About 12 or so years ago we went out to dinner.    We start talking about things and she just assumes I would be clueless about the music, movies, and T.V. of the 30s - 50s.   E.g.  comments like "well I'm sure you don't know this actor, but when we were on the set filming Honey West,,,"  and I would then tell her thinks I knew.    She was shocked that this much younger man knew anything about that (i.e.  she didn't know that my passion was that era of music, movies, T.V.  of her era).

She gave me a copy of one of her Honey West books signed by Anne Francis.  She had a room in her home dedicated to the books and T.V. show.   Anne and her would see each other from time to time,  but sadly my advisor friend and I were never able to set up a "date" with Anne.    I really wanted to discuss the filming of Bad Day At Black Rock with her,  Robert Ryan, Tracy, etc....   and how it was being the only women on that set.

 

If they were living in NYC at the time, they probably  didn't see "Decoy." Casey and Honey are very different characters though, so I'm sure there was no borrowing, consciously or otherwise.

Watching that YBYL clip was fun. When Skip said he first saw Gloria coming out of a window backward - and in a bikini! - I was expecting a remark from Groucho. But he was a gentleman. 

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1 hour ago, TopBilled said:

I think the name of Garland's character on S&MK was an homage to country singer Dottie West who was very popular at the time.

Incidentally feminism is not a dirty word. I'm a feminist (thanks to my very out lesbian professors in college).

No, feminism is not a dirty word, and sexism probably isn't the reason "Decoy" didn't catch on. 

But "Scarecrow and Mrs. King" wasn't one of my shows, and country pop wasn't my music, so I don't know. Just seems odd to name a character after a random celeb. I kind of like think Honey was the inspiration for the character. 

Like how Elinor Donahue played a girl named Miriam Welby on "The Odd Couple" after having played Robert Young's daughter on "Father Knows Best." 

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32 minutes ago, LuckyDan said:

No, feminism is not a dirty word, and sexism probably isn't the reason "Decoy" didn't catch on. 

But "Scarecrow and Mrs. King" wasn't one of my shows, and country pop wasn't my music, so I don't know. Just seems odd to name a character after a random celeb. I kind of like think Honey was the inspiration for the character. 

Like how Elinor Donahue played a girl named Miriam Welby on "The Odd Couple" after having played Robert Young's daughter on "Father Knows Best." 

Well not long ago I re-watched all four seasons of Scarecrow & Mrs. King because I was visiting my father in Wisconsin who was ailing, and he always enjoyed this program. I re-watched it with him. (All four seasons are on DVD and can be streamed on Amazon.) We particularly love season 2 since a half dozen episodes were filmed on location in England, Germany and Austria.

Juanita Bartlett, top TV scribe and producer responsible for much of the success of The Rockford Files series was executive producing S&MK during the second season. One of the episodes ("Our Man In Tegernsee") really feels like a Rockford story and probably was an unused script from the earlier show that she adapted/recycled.

Anyway, Kate Jackson was the one calling most of the shots behind the scenes because she owned a chunk of the show and her name appears as one of the main producers during the fourth and final season. Kate brought her friend and former costar Sam Melville from The Rookies on as a special guest star for a few episodes. He played her husband on The Rookies and now on S&MK he was playing her ex-husband.

Even though Melville was playing a character with a different name, there are slight allusions to their former "married life" on The Rookies. So yes, there are some post-modern elements occurring on the program, but I am not sure if there is any evidence that they were trying to link the stories to Honey West. As I said, the show has more of a direct correlation with Rockford and Rookies and TV spy shows from the 60s and 70s. It has also been compared to Remington Steele since it features two thirty-somethings solving crimes, falling in love.

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Just now, TopBilled said:

So yes, there are some post-modern elements occurring on the program, but I am not sure if there is any evidence that they were trying to link the stories to Honey West.

Nor am I, but is there any evidence the name Dotty was an homage to the singer? 

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Just now, LuckyDan said:

Nor am I, but is there any evidence the name Dotty was an homage to the singer? 

Well it would be an amazing coincidence that Dotty West was not inspired by Dottie West when the singer had a bunch of chart topping tunes just prior to 1983 when the show began. But yeah, I was speculating. Maybe Garland was allowed to name the character? She certainly couldn't have the surname King, since she was playing Amanda's mother not her mother-in-law.

One thing I should mention is that Amanda and Lee Stetson (Bruce Boxleitner's character) eventually marry early in season 4. So the last 15 episodes, it's a bit unrealistic that Kate Jackson's character is still going by the name Amanda King instead of Amanda Stetson. But I guess they had to keep it that way since the program would have had to be retitled from Scarecrow & Mrs. King to Scarecrow & Mrs. Stetson.

The show benefits from some excellent writing, particularly season 2 as I mentioned above. A few of the guest stars like Hildegarde Neff, Howard Duff, Harold Gould and Jean Stapleton (who did two episodes, one of them on location in Europe) were outstanding.

My favorite episode is the one called "The Three Faces of Emily" in which Stapleton uses three disguises, playing three separate "characters" in an attempt to nab some Russians. Stapleton is written as an older version of Amanda, a long-time spy who uses common sense to get out of tricky situations. I felt that they could have created a spinoff for Stapleton but I guess the network (CBS) already had Jessica Fletcher!

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Just now, TopBilled said:

Well it would be an amazing coincidence that Dotty West was not inspired by Dottie West when the singer had a bunch of chart topping tunes just prior to 1983 when the show began. But yeah, I was speculating.

West is common name, especially in fiction. Dotty and Honey are both cutesy nicks.

I'll tell you what would have been an amazing coincidence: naming her Dotty Parton. 

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Just now, LuckyDan said:

West is common name, especially in fiction. Dotty and Honey are both cutesy nicks.

I'll tell you what would have been an amazing coincidence: naming her Dotty Parton. 

Yes, I agree! :) 

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  • 1 month later...

Anne  Francis  Honey  West  character is  patterned  from  Cathy  Gale  (  Honor  Blackman)  of  the  Avengers.  Anne  and  Honor  look  like  they  could be  sisters. They wear  the  same  fashions  and  have  defense  against  attackers  (Judo).

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23 hours ago, cinemaman said:

Anne  Francis  Honey  West  character is  patterned  from  Cathy  Gale  (  Honor  Blackman)  of  the  Avengers.  Anne  and  Honor  look  like  they  could be  sisters. They wear  the  same  fashions  and  have  defense  against  attackers  (Judo).

I'm friends with the author of the books and creator of Honey West,  Gloria Fickling.    She told me that her husband who did most of the writing,  Forrest E. “Skip” Fickling,   based the character on Gloria and that Anne Francis based her interpretation of the character more on Gloria instead of any existing actress from another T.V. show.

Of course Gloria could be embellishing.    E.g.  she told me Spelling canceled the show after a year because he didn't wish to continue to pay Skip and Gloria for the rights and stole her general idea and created Charlie's Angels.         

Here is Gloria and Skip on You Bet Your Life. 

 

 

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On 2/3/2021 at 10:21 AM, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yea,  I will ask her about that.     My financial advisor was also her financial advisor and that is how we meet.   About 12 or so years ago we went out to dinner.    We start talking about things and she just assumes I would be clueless about the music, movies, and T.V. of the 30s - 50s.   E.g.  comments like "well I'm sure you don't know this actor, but when we were on the set filming Honey West,,,"  and I would then tell her thinks I knew.    She was shocked that this much younger man knew anything about that (i.e.  she didn't know that my passion was that era of music, movies, T.V.  of her era).

She gave me a copy of one of her Honey West books signed by Anne Francis.  She had a room in her home dedicated to the books and T.V. show.   Anne and her would see each other from time to time,  but sadly my advisor friend and I were never able to set up a "date" with Anne.    I really wanted to discuss the filming of Bad Day At Black Rock with her,  Robert Ryan, Tracy, etc....   and how it was being the only women on that set.

 

So, not like Charlie here then, eh James? ;)

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I watched an episode of Quincy M.E. this morning.

Anyone else a fan of this long-running Jack Klugman series?

I was reading user reviews on the IMDb. Some complained that the show became too preachy.

But I like it when routine murder mysteries combine social issues.

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  • 1 month later...

The  FBI  tv  series  was  an  great  place  to see  new  incoming  stars.  Here  is  a list,  Ann  Archer  Karen  Black  Jeff  Bridges   Charles  Bronson  James  Caan   Michael  Douglas   Robert  Duvall    Harrison   Ford     Gene  Hackman   Diane  Keaton   Harvey  Keitel   Sondra  Locke   Cicely  Tyson   Brenda  Vaccaro   Billy  Dee  Williams

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Has anyone seen Homicide: Life on the Streets...? This is a show I never watched when it was first run on NBC in the 90s.

I've been reading up on it, and it looks interesting.

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3 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Has anyone seen Homicide: Life on the Streets...? This is a show I never watched when it was first run on NBC in the 90s.

I've been reading up on it, and it looks interesting.

I watched every episode of that series many times, and it is still on the DVR to pick up stray showings if present, though there haven't been any shown for years.

Most actors on this show gave great performances, then, and took that talent to the stratosphere.

Yaphet Kotto, Kyle Secor, Andre Brauer all had great characters and gave great performances.

Clark Johnson turned it into an acting/directing career including The Wire, Homeland, The Shield.

Zeljko Ivanek cut his teeth here and went to greatness in a wide swath of prominent TV, including The West Wing, Madam Secretary, Oz, and 24.

Melissa Leo took this and made a career in movies and an Academy Award.

Guest star Vincent D'Onofrio won them a Peabody for the most tragic TV death I've ever seen.

Then there is Richard Belzer; his character, Det. John Munch, has made appearances in dozens of other TV guest spots.

From the detecting struggles, the "Red Balls" (i.e. cases with political overtones), and any/all the kooky killers. Gotta see them.

Recognise all the Baltimore "Charm City" landmarks, too, from the rooftop discussions by the harbor, Fells Point, Camden Yards.

A DEFINITE MUST SEE.

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42 minutes ago, wbogacz said:

I watched every episode of that series many times, and it is still on the DVR to pick up stray showings if present, though there haven't been any shown for years.

Most actors on this show gave great performances, then, and took that talent to the stratosphere.

Yaphet Kotto, Kyle Secor, Andre Brauer all had great characters and gave great performances.

Clark Johnson turned it into an acting/directing career including The Wire, Homeland, The Shield.

Zeljko Ivanek cut his teeth here and went to greatness in a wide swath of prominent TV, including The West Wing, Madam Secretary, Oz, and 24.

Melissa Leo took this and made a career in movies and an Academy Award.

Guest star Vincent D'Onofrio won them a Peabody for the most tragic TV death I've ever seen.

Then there is Richard Belzer; his character, Det. John Munch, has made appearances in dozens of other TV guest spots.

From the detecting struggles, the "Red Balls" (i.e. cases with political overtones), and any/all the kooky killers. Gotta see them.

Recognise all the Baltimore "Charm City" landmarks, too, from the rooftop discussions by the harbor, Fells Point, Camden Yards.

A DEFINITE MUST SEE.

Thanks for the endorsement. I see that it had very low ratings yet managed to stay on the air for seven seasons (though the first two seasons were abbreviated while they were fine-tuning the format). 

I was wondering why it's not syndicated or why it's not available for streaming anywhere. The entire series was put on DVD a few years ago though it has a hefty price tag and reviewers say the video/audio quality is not too great. 

I did find three random episodes on YouTube, from the later seasons.

The episode that looks most interesting to me is the one with Steve Allen & Jayne Meadows, which is from the sixth season I believe.

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8 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I was wondering why it's not syndicated or why it's not available for streaming anywhere. The entire series was put on DVD a few years ago though it has a hefty price tag and reviewers say the video/audio quality is not too great.

I think the low ratings were because it was always HIDING. I really had to work hard to find it sometimes; the network seemed to always move it around. But great TV cannot be killed, even when killing is the driving plot. I don't understand why it was kept so rare, but the price reflects demand, which deserves to be high.

It was also gritty. The show was based on David Simon's book (which should be read), which was developed from his journalism of city crime in the Baltimore Sun. The city was in a cocaine/crack/drug craze, which also formed the basis of The Wire. People may not have been that eager to see "outside" carried into their living rooms at night as entertainment.

The show really worked the Seven Deadly Sins, with Daniel Baldwin's character making up about 4 of them - WRATH, LUST, GLUTTONY, SLOTH; possibly even the remainder - his character was a mess. Bad habits in all the characters, including smoking, infidelity, anger - lots of anger.

There was a running thread for who got PRIDE, since the murder board was always in plain view - the solved in BLACK, the unsolved in RED, and the carryovers (since the board was cleansed every New Year), in BLUE. Kyle Secor's unsolved first case remained in BLUE nearly the whole series. Andre Brauer as Pembleton rightfully "always bet on black", and his cases all closed.

There was a lot of character development; a few episodes developed just one character - like Melissa Leo's character taken back to her oystering family homestead, and solving a local case herself along the way. Sometimes the show over-emphasized the tragedy and personal struggles of the partners to the exclusion of the cases of the week. Real use of guns was rare, most of the perpetrators came willingly, so there was no real "action". Cerebral TV in search of an audience, and found a dedicated one.

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1 hour ago, wbogacz said:

I think the low ratings were because it was always HIDING. I really had to work hard to find it sometimes; the network seemed to always move it around. But great TV cannot be killed, even when killing is the driving plot. I don't understand why it was kept so rare, but the price reflects demand, which deserves to be high.

It was also gritty. The show was based on David Simon's book (which should be read), which was developed from his journalism of city crime in the Baltimore Sun. The city was in a cocaine/crack/drug craze, which also formed the basis of The Wire. People may not have been that eager to see "outside" carried into their living rooms at night as entertainment.

The show really worked the Seven Deadly Sins, with Daniel Baldwin's character making up about 4 of them - WRATH, LUST, GLUTTONY, SLOTH; possibly even the remainder - his character was a mess. Bad habits in all the characters, including smoking, infidelity, anger - lots of anger.

There was a running thread for who got PRIDE, since the murder board was always in plain view - the solved in BLACK, the unsolved in RED, and the carryovers (since the board was cleansed every New Year), in BLUE. Kyle Secor's unsolved first case remained in BLUE nearly the whole series. Andre Brauer as Pembleton rightfully "always bet on black", and his cases all closed.

There was a lot of character development; a few episodes developed just one character - like Melissa Leo's character taken back to her oystering family homestead, and solving a local case herself along the way. Sometimes the show over-emphasized the tragedy and personal struggles of the partners to the exclusion of the cases of the week. Real use of guns was rare, most of the perpetrators came willingly, so there was no real "action". Cerebral TV in search of an audience, and found a dedicated one.

After my previous comment, I widened my search on YouTube and found there are episodes from almost every season. 

Your comments make me eager to start watching it. Though I am thinking the overdone steady-cam will probably make it seem dated (like NYPD Blue maybe). I'm a fan of Yaphet Kotto  and Michelle Forbes, but I don't know most of the other cast members.

I did read some user reviews on Amazon's website. A few were written by British fans of the series. One British reviewer said the show was almost too intelligent for American audiences (which may explain why it was not a ratings hit).

Any particular episodes you recommend?

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12 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Any particular episodes you recomment?

Too many great ones; many good ones.

Standouts:

"The Subway" - Season 5 - Vince D'Onofrio guest stars - Peabody winner. (My #1)

Season 2 opener "Bop Gun" with Robin Williams doing D.R.A.M.A. like the best of them. (My #2)

"Crosetti" - Season 3, about the body of one of their detectives found floating in the bay. (My #3)

"Thrill of the Kill" - Season 4 - a serial killer moves north along I-95. (My #4)

Then watch everything as close to episode order as you can manage to find.

Any episodes dealing with Detective Bayliss and the perennially unsolved Adena Watson case (it shows up all through 7 seasons, starting at "Ghost of a Chance").

"Smoke Gets In Your Eyes" - the entire squad notices how much everyone smokes.

All the early season 3 episodes dealing with the Diocese murder.

"The Last of the Watermen" - Melissa Leo's character goes back home.

"The Hat" - Lily Tomlin as a suspect who escapes custody.

Season 5 - Episodes in the Luther Mahoney drama; continues into Season 6.

"Partners and Other Strangers" - another squad detective found dead.

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Thanks for the recommendations.

I watched three episodes tonight from Season 6.

I started with 'Shaggy Dog, City Goat' since it was the Steve Allen / Jayne Meadows episode I was interested in seeing. I thought they were superb but they didn't have a lot of screen time. I found the second plot about the hillbillies to be very dull.

Then I watched 'Closet Cases' which had a strong central plot, but I found the subplot with Bayliss suddenly deciding he was bisexual to be a bit unrealistic. I suppose we could deduce that his relationship with Cox fell apart at the beginning because he couldn't get it up with her, but Bayliss doesn't really send off same-sex vibes. He seems more asexual to me than anything. The scene with him saying he was attracted to the killer in order to get a confession out of the killer was contrived.

What I did like about 'Closet Cases' was the fact that they filmed scenes inside an actual gay club and the extras looked authentic.

'Secrets' was the third episode I watched tonight. This was probably my favorite one. Written by Yaphet Kotto, it had some very sharp dialogue and the actual secrets of the murder victims seemed like stuff people would want to keep on the down-low. I really loved the character of the old man at the country club who was hiring the photographer to take pictures of the others that he felt were immoral. He had his own unique code of right and wrong and the fact that he wound up a murder victim near the end was a clever twist, because someone else (the photographer) felt he was immoral.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 9/14/2019 at 5:19 AM, FloydDBarber said:

Naked City and Peter Gunn were great. I also liked Columbo and The Rockford Files. Mission Impossible was very good.

Based on a couple of recommendations here, and the fact that my Library had a set of Season 1 Naked City, I watched it. I looked carefully for the pre-star performances of stars of today and found a few, but IMDb shows many others in the later seasons. I liked quite a few of the stories, and the one that stands out, wouldn't you know it, has Peter Falk in the cast as a blackmailer. I also found interesting stories containing Jack Klugman and Nehemiah Persoff. And, while I didn't read about the presence of James Garner (from Rockford above) anywhere, I found Peggy Anne Garner (no relation, I don't think) and her husband of the time, Albert Salmi, in a later season episode.

Good TV, and the attempts to add a noir-ish spin to it are evident.

I also liked the way the star of the show "dropped the mike" halfway through the season and went home. Can't get that today. Pilot contracts can lock up an actor until re-negotiation, probably just because of this.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I just finished watching all eight episodes of the first season of Dick Wolf's latest creation -- Law & Order: Organized Crime

In many ways it reminds me of the old CBS classic WiseGuy where there is a long-running arc with cops trying to infiltrate a mob boss's empire in the hopes of bringing him down.

Though relying on certain stereotypes and tropes, there are enough "modern" updates (woke material) to bring it into 2021. 

They also had Mariska Hargitay make guest appearances in half the episodes, while Chris Meloni continues to make guest appearances on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/3/2021 at 1:40 PM, TopBilled said:

I just finished watching all eight episodes of the first season of Dick Wolf's latest creation -- Law & Order: Organized Crime

In many ways it reminds me of the old CBS classic WiseGuy where there is a long-running arc with cops trying to infiltrate a mob boss's empire in the hopes of bringing him down.

Though relying on certain stereotypes and tropes, there are enough "modern" updates (woke material) to bring it into 2021. 

They also had Mariska Hargitay make guest appearances in half the episodes, while Chris Meloni continues to make guest appearances on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.

I liked this as well.  Dylan McDermott was certainly chewing up the scenery. He had a menacing presence and, as you point out, TB, he was woke, but only as long as it didn’t affect his business.  When it did, family ties became transactional.  Excellent performances from the new cast members.  I was happy to see Tamara Taylor as the ex-crime wife, and Elliot’s potential love interest.   

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6 hours ago, cinemaspeak59 said:

I liked this as well.  Dylan McDermott was certainly chewing up the scenery. He had a menacing presence and, as you point out, TB, he was woke, but only as long as it didn’t affect his business.  When it did, family ties became transactional.  Excellent performances from the new cast members.  I was happy to see Tamara Taylor as the ex-crime wife, and Elliot’s potential love interest.   

Yes, she is amazing. Really enjoyed watching her.

These "villains" are billed with Meloni and the other cop characters in the opening credits. But I expect once this arc finishes at the top of season 2, these people will depart the cast and the next group of villains will replace them for a new arc.

I can't wait for Law & Order: Organized Crime to return in the fall.

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