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The Landlord


FredCDobbs
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Fred, you and I are always going to disagree on a lot of things -- and I respect your feelings on content, quality, etc., even when I disagree, and I hope you feel the same way in a reciprocal manner.

 

That said: I think you're 100% right on "The Landlord."

 

We don't disagree here. While I love older and classic films that pushed the edge, I agree with you, Fred, this one is just tacky and vulgar.

 

I hope someone can fill both Fred & me in on the value of "The Landlord." Fred & I both love classic films, from very different standpoints, and we both think "The Landlord" is junk. Ah, convince ONE of us it's a good movie. Good luck.

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I found The Landlord to be a terrific film, and probably holds up better than Guess Who's Coming to Dinner in terms of race relations. Sure, there's some profanity, but I would hardly call the film vulgar or tacky.

 

You're likely right, Fred. There are some who don't like hearing profanity, and more will come here to protest. Hopefully, they won't argue against this film. It's really good.

 

BTW, the cast is excellent. Lee Grant's excellent, as well as Pearl Bailey. The performance I liked best was Diana Sands. It's a beautiful, heartbreaking performance.

 

Message was edited by: sweetsmellofsuccess

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I was actually willing to give this modern movie -- which I detest seeing TCM run more and more often lately -- a look-see, since I AM a (beleagured) landlord and am always looking for commisseration in my misery, lol, but I have to agree with Fred: pure junk unworthy of TCM...

 

Please, programmers, quit pandering to the Gen Xers or whatever your doing and be TRUE to your mission statement. Remember: there are more of us (aging baby-boomers) than them!!!

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I found the film very dated in its style/story, but well acted (the late great Diana Sands and Lee Grant particularly). I saw it when it came out, but hardly remembered anything about it. Beau Bridges sure was cute!

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While I would hardly call a movie from 1970, a modern movie, I do agree that its language and lack of status as an important movie from that period, makes it an odd choice on TCM. There used to be much higher standard in their selection of films shown from outside of the golden age of Hollywood.

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To those born in the 70s or 80s, of course 1970 wouldn't seem "modern"... I apply that definition to anything after 1960 and would LOVE to see TCM focus on movies made before this time and, especially, offer more obscure silents, foreign, indies, and documentaries. But I'm an odd duck.

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I've allowed many times on this board (I see you're new to it) that there are a HANDFUL of decent movies made after 1960... In fact, I was quite vocal in praising "Brokeback Mountain"... However, as a general trend, it's been all downhill in recent decades... And a "classic," to me, is synonymous with "old"... I don't know that "Bountiful" should've been shown on TCM, to be a strict purist, but I'm personally glad I got to see it. It's also true, of course, that the decades pre-1960 produces some real boners, but even those B-movies are easier to watch than today's F-fests...

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Please, programmers, quit pandering to the Gen Xers or whatever your doing and be TRUE to your mission statement.>>

 

But they are being true to their original mission statement:

 

Turner Classic Movies, is a 24-hour cable network from Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.

TCM presents the greatest motion pictures of all time from the ?20s through the ?80s, commercial-free and without interruption.

(emphisis added).

 

After they celebrated their 10th anniversary on the air in 2004, they updated the mission statement to include films from 1990s.

 

They are not pandering to the younger crowd. They are doing what they have always done. Programming the channel to accomodate all of their viewers.

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>Turner Classic Movies, is a 24-hour cable network from Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.

>TCM presents the greatest motion pictures of all time from the ?20s through the ?80s,

 

Hi Liz,

 

I don't think "The Landlord" was one of the "greatest motion pictures of all time."

 

Fred

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True. But plenty of the "old" movies shown on TCM wouldnt be considered as some of the best of all time either. I must say I was a little surprised to hear the F and N word spoken on TCM! At least that early in the evening...........

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What is most irritating is that TCM aired "The Landlord" in prime time, yet it aired some of Val Lewton's rare classics late at night and early the next morning. My recording machine didn't work for two of the Lewton films, so I've never seen them, yet here was "The Landlord" in prime time.

 

This is a film that nobody here has ever requested, nobody has mentioned, nobody has been dying to see it, and it is in no way a "classic". It's just a cheap film that was probably cheap to rent.

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Remember that not all of us have the same taste. When TCM is showing something that I have no desire to watch, I have the option of plugging in a DVD of something that I do want to see (again). The best thing about old, "classic" movies is the "fun factor" we derive from watching them. They were made to entertain the movie goers, and they still succeed quite well today. Perhaps it it is the "target audience" that makes the more recent films less entertaining (at least for me.) But then profanity is only used by those seeking to get attention, and I've never considered sex to be a spectator sport.

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I agree with you there. I hate how the really old movies get shown on the graveyard shift! I can record them but I only have so much time to watch them. Half the time I never get to them or lose interest.....And it's never as much fun as watching them "live".

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I, for one have been waiting for a long time to enjoy The Landlord, again. And, thanks to TCM, I was overjoyed to see it was being featured this month.

I think it is an accurate microcosm of the the USA in the early days of the ERA. Liberals were actually bigots, conservatives were less bigotted than they thought and everyone under thirty was dropping out into hippiedom or a reasonable facsimile.. Everyone was on edge and mistrust abounded, yet to some degree, we all got along, if not side-by-side, at least within viewing distance.

I feel this film does show much of that in a humorous and kindhearted way. I see nothing vulgar or cheap about it...it was pretty honest without being vulgar or cheap. The performances were top-rate, it's hard to decide who was better than the next, and thanks to Hal Ashby (one of the most underappreciated directors in Hollywood) that was the reason it worked so well.

Elgar might well have been one of the first whiteboys to attempt to gentrify the Park Slope section of Brooklyn, and now as most of us probably know, it one of the most desireable areas to live (for everyone who can afford it)

I think all the reactionarys who were first to condemn this excellent film should rethink their position. (as far as Val Lewton goes, how do you suppose they can show some ten 80 minute movies all in prime time?)

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Okay... I'll agree that watching movies like this from the late 60s is interesting/informative in a socioeconofashionoanthropovehicular way... But I could get the same result from watching reruns on TVland... I expect more from TCM, and TCM should ask more of itself... Agree that it gets old and is a lot of trouble (and not as much fun as watching live) trying record all the GOOD movies (the best are actually shown during the work day; it's enough to make one try for disability retirement)... "Tape it" is about as satisfying a response as "change the channel"... Why should the *true* classic movie fans who were here from the beginning be inconvenienced in this way?

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>I think all the reactionarys who were first to condemn this excellent film should rethink their position.

 

So this is what it has come to at TCM? Me, a classic movie fan since I was 8 years old in the late 1940s, who saw ?High Noon? and ?The Treasure of the Sierra Madre? when they were first released to theaters, and who recognized that these were indeed ?classic? films for all times, now I am nothing but a ?reactionary??

 

>(as far as Val Lewton goes, how do you suppose they can show some ten 80 minute movies all in prime time?)

 

Doh, over several nights. Three nights in one week, or one night a week, each week, all month. There are an average of 30 ?prime time? nights in each month.

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It's DUH.(not DOH)...if you're going to insult, be accurate.

I'm sure TCM understands that there's a prime-time every night, even if I don't get it, but don't you think that maybe they wanted to make it a Val Lewton day, and not a Val Lewton month?

And I think it's great that you saw some of the greats when they were first released...so did I, but I still like newer, more modern films if they do what a film must do...entertain, educate and or provoke. Seems to me that THE LANDLORD hits all those nails squarely on the head

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>but don't you think that maybe they wanted to make it a Val Lewton day, and not a Val Lewton month?

 

If it was ?Val Lewton Day?, it would have started earlier in the ?day? and lasted all ?day? and into the evening of the same ?day?.

 

But it actually didn?t start until 8 PM Eastern on Tuesday, and then most of the films were aired well past midnight on Wednesday, with three showings of the same 1-1/2 documentary during that time.

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I've been a TCM viewer since it began, and as far back as I can remember, they always begin a special interview or filmed biography at eight o'clock in the evening. Then they follow with appropriate films and a repeat of the interview/biography, with more film throughout the night.

I agree, this makes seeing all the films difficult, if not impossible. But considering the fact that they repeat these films many times thereafter, it's just a matter of time before one can see them all

So...it seems to me that your beef is with TCM programming and not with THE LANDLORD, per se.

I seriously doubt that your complaint is going to change much regarding TCM programming, but filing a formal complaint to that department can't do any harm.

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OMG, Fred; I'm right there with ya!!! Has TCM come to this? Not only SHOWING tripe like "The Landlord," but having 20-somethings, I presume, on the message board defending it as "educational"; huhhhhhhhhhh??? (sorry if I misspelled that) I also notice posts beginning "Who like Tom Hanks" and "Isn't Johnny Depp great?" grooooooooaaaaaaaaaaan I'm reminded of two other semi-classics, "Children of the Damned" and "The Bodysnatchers"...

 

Er, the classic originals, kids; NOT the (better, I'm sure you'd argue) remakes...

 

Oh, Fred; where we can we go if our last refuge is gone?????????????????

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