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Can't Find a DVD? HP Will Make It - Classic film fans celebrate!!!


yanceycravat
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Just read this on the IMDB...

 

Hope it's true. Hope it's soon!

 

Yancey

 

Hewlett-Packard has signed a deal with Sony Pictures to turn out DVDs from the studio's library whenever customers request them, the Los Angeles Times reported today (Thursday). The deal will allow consumers to order movies that ordinarily would not be stocked by dealers because they are too obscure or too old. HP indicated that it expects to sign similar deals with other studios. "We're hoping this provides another option to make available products that wouldn't necessarily garner widespread retail shelf space," Jason Spivak, head of strategic development at Sony Home Entertainment, told the Times.Added Doug Warner, head of HP's digital content business, "If studios can sell more catalog than previously, they can generate more money."

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Sounds great! Wonder what they would charge??? You would think it wouldn't be too great since there wouldn't be artwork, extras...but, they might just want to really charge a lot knowing people would be dying to see some films that have never been shown on TV or released on DVD.

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Here is the LA Times article...

 

HP to make Sony DVDs

 

It will create copies of the studio's films and TV shows on demand.

By Michelle Quinn, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer

January 24, 2008

SAN FRANCISCO -- Hewlett-Packard Co. plans to announce today that it has signed an agreement with Sony Pictures Home Entertainment to create made-to-order DVDs of some of the studio's movies and TV shows.

 

The agreement, whose terms were not disclosed, boosts Palo Alto-based HP's ambition to play the middleman in the future of how entertainment is distributed.

 

Sony is the first major Hollywood studio to work with HP in its fledgling business of making DVDs of movies, TV shows and other video content only when someone orders them -- much like HP rival Dell Inc. does with computers. It will allow consumers to order DVDs of some of Sony's older or more obscure programming, which retailers tend not to stock because it's not economically viable.

 

By making DVDs on demand, HP says it can help studios unlock the value of their libraries and give consumers more choice.

 

"We're hoping this provides another option to make available products that wouldn't necessarily garner widespread retail shelf space," said Jason Spivak, senior vice president of strategic development at Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, a division of Sony Corp. of America.

 

The agreement comes a month after HP ended its 11-month-old video download service with Wal-Mart Stores Inc. HP had powered the service on Walmart.com that sold customers TV shows and movies to download to their computers on the same day as DVD releases. But download sales were reportedly not strong.

 

Separately, HP has started a DVD production business and already has agreements with 40 content partners for 5,000 titles, including classic science fiction movies, exercise videos and children's series. The titles aren't on sale yet, but HP said it planned to soon announce partnerships with websites that would sell these made-to-order DVDs.

 

"This is part of HP's effort to transform digital entertainment," said Doug Warner, vice president of HP's digital content services business. "If studios can sell more catalog than previously, they can generate more money."

 

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-hp24jan24,1,1276080.story

 

Message was edited by: ziggyelman

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You would think it wouldn't be too great since there wouldn't be artwork, extras...

 

They probably wouldn't contain extras, but where does it say it wouldn't have artwork? I'd imagine it would come in a regular DVD case with cover art, but the DVD itself probably wouldn't contain any design.

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In this computer and internet age, there is no reason why the vast majority, if not all movies, cannot be digitally preserved and stored on some central server, and downloaded by customers as needed. Either via the internet to a home computer, or through local outlets such as Blockbuster etc. This would certainly eliminate the costs of producing DVD?s, packaging, distribution etc. And make more movies available.

 

It makes perfect sense to us (as movie fans). But would it make sense to the companies that own the movies, whose prime concern after all is money and profits (not movies).

 

Regards

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Thats fine in theory, however, I have a couple of problems with that,,: DRM

And a more basic problem Hard drives DO die, What happens when all the stuff you paid for and saved on one 500gig hd is lost when the drive dies, physicial crash can't recover data, do they let you re download all your stuff, and how do you proof you've lost it? Don't even get me started on DRM,, and folks how never could hook up a vcr much less a computer to a tv..

 

And a more basic problem Hard drives DO die, What happens when all the stuff you paid for and saved on one 500gig hd is lost when the drive dies, physicial crash can't recover data, do they let you re download all your stuff, and how do you proof you've lost it? Don't even get me started on DRM,, and folks how never could hook up a vcr much less a computer to a tv..

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Downloads are still so iffy because of different connect rates, and a lot of customers will want different features. Main Movie, all the extras, subtitles, different languages, interview sets, etc. Once they get the menu-ing system down to select all variations for downloads, that's going to be one step forward. But vast areas of the country still have limits on download speeds.

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>What happens when all the stuff you paid for and saved on

>one 500gig hd is lost when the drive dies

 

That's why it's so important to backup your data.

Buy a terra-byte drive and back up your two 500 GB drives (for example) or burn them to DVD also.

 

Message was edited by: Snorky

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>In this computer and internet age, there is no reason why

>the vast majority, if not all movies, cannot be digitally preserved

>and stored on some central server, and downloaded by customers

>as needed. Either via the internet to a home computer, or through

>local outlets such as Blockbuster etc.

 

At that point it will likely be available with the remote control to your cable box or dish.

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And how many people ACTUALLY get get around to backing up thier stuff? I or understand how to set up redundant drive automatically sync and back them self up.. I still have stuff on my p vr waiting to be burned to dvd, So Trying to burn every show and movie I buy digitally would be almost litterly a full time jobs, for someone one who buys a lot. Then theres DRM, If DRM allows of burning on copy for personal back up and the disc comes out a coaster and don't play then your stuck. So buying DVDs is a little like buying a hard copy book you know its good.. Any many people have problems getting computers to burn DVDs and the like and aren't as techy as others. The idea of a CD/DVD-Kiosk, where one can order any CD or DVD in the cataloge and have them burned while you wait. is a very good idea, Depending on how its implemented this could the next big thing since sliced bread...LOL

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