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Off Topic: Favorite Music?


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> {quote:title=jamesjazzguitar wrote:}{quote}Well I'm at my best soloing in the keys of Bb and Eb since those are the horn keys and many of my favorite jazz standards are in those keys. Most rock and blues guitar players I know like the key of E the best since they can play open strings and at the 12 fret. I can play in the key of E but I prefer not to. Also the 53 Gibson L7 I have, while it does have a cutaway, isn't great to play high up the fretboard. But in the middle of the fretboard: This guitar has a sound only one can only get with an over 50 year guitar.

As a bass player, my favorite key is without a doubt A. You've got I, IV, & V (A, D, E) as open strings. Therefore much of the time you can go up the fretboard without having to kill yourself trying to hit the next root. I've got two electric basses (a Music man & a Fender precision) & one acoustic bass that I play in a bluegrass band with.

 

I can play guitar but just 1st position chords & rudimentary bar chords. I mainly play just to accompany myself singing. I'm 50 times a better bass player than guitar player.

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And speaking of the Boss, misswonderly, check out this very famous cover of a Sprinsteen song. This is rock & roll performace at a very high level. Only flaw I hear is that the drummer is singing flat. And check out the keyboard player. Notice how he's playing the very fast repeating figure with the lead guitar in his right hand & at the same time playing a synthesizer part with his left hand. BTW, the keyboard player is who the band was named after.

 

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Hey, since I know your a fan of Paul's singing how would you rate him as a bass player? He is one of my favorites. His playing on songs like Rain, Paperback Writer, etc.. is what really makes many of these songs for me. Being a jazz guy I like the walking bass that is common in jazz. While Paul isn't playing in that style he doesn't just hang on the root notes but plays to the next chord and thus creates more movement than most bass players (especially those during the 60s).

 

 

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I would rate him very high as an important bassist in rock. Not technically but as someone who brought a melodic sense to bass playing that was unprecedented. He came up with incredible bass lines that helped bring bass more to the forefront. Like you, I love his bass playing on Rain. But also on Dear Prudence, With a Little Help From My Friends, Hey Bulldog, Come Together, Something. Too many to count, really.

 

My favorite rock bass player is Rick Danko of the Band. It took me 20 years to play their songs. Not cause they were hard technically but knowing what notes to play & when to play them to give the right feel. Listen to the bass part on The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down. When he decides to play the root & when he plays the 3rd or the 5th. Or when he doubles the melody and/or the horn line (or when he plays counterpoint to them). Brilliant in its subtle musicality. Same with every Band song he played.

 

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Who are some of your favorite musicians, james? I've played enough jazz to know that the best musicians by far are jazz musicians. Because not only do they have more technical ability, generally speaking, than rock or country or even classical musicians, but they are making it up as they go along because jazz is the art of improvisation. I think my favorite jazz musician was Thelonious Monk. During his solos, the way he connected his musical thoughts from one moment to the next was genius.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZ9El7k4mNo

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BigFaceSmallRazer, I have a funny story about Thelonious Monk.

 

As you may know, John Coltrane was a pretty unusual person. Great sax player, maybe the greatest, and a very spiritual man. But odd (not in a bad way.)

 

One time he sat in on one of Thelonious Monk's sessions and played on a few tracks. Later, someone asked him how he liked it.

He replied that he'd never work with Monk again, declaring "That cat's too weird for me !"

In view of how weird Coltrane himself was, I thought this was pretty funny. Also a testament to how very "weird" Monk must have been !

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Well, it's being July 4th, I wanted to post something by a great American musician and songwriter.

Could-a been a hundred people, but I came up with Duke Ellington. Even the song title is patriotic (if you hail from the U.S.) It's called Beautiful American .

 

Happy Independence Day, my American cousins !

 

 

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Some of my favorite musicians are Wes Montgomery, Dexter Gordon, Neils-Henning Orsted Pedersen, Dizzy Gillespie, Monk, Oscar Peterson,,,,

 

One guitar play I really love is Bireli Lagrene. He can do it all. He plays fusion, gypsy jazz, bebop jazz, The guy has flawless technique and soul. People should check out his album Blue Eyes. Here he plays the songs associated with Frank Sintara like Witchcraft, Got You Under My Skin, etc.. He even sings on a few like Lady is a Tramp. To me he is the most well rounded highly skilled musician playing music today.

 

 

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Charles Mingus is a unique musician. He wrote a lot of very hip songs. Mostly blues based but with added harmonic interest. In the early 50s Mingus quit music and became a postman. But Red Norvo was looking for a base player and he got Mingus. The Red Norvo Trio (vibes), Farlow (guitar) and Mingus (bass) was a big hit and Mingus never left music.

 

He is spotlighted in the movie All Night Long. The best fiction movie with a jazz setting in my opinion.

 

 

 

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Interesting story about Monk, misswonderly. Ever see a movie called Straight No Chaser? It's a doc on Monk by Clint Eastwood. Yeah. He was very strange. And those are some great musicians you listed, james. I'm familiar with some of them. I'll have to check out Bireli Lagrene. There are so many incredible musicians out there it's scary.

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A jazz man that I have always enjoyed is Bix Beiderbecke. His performance on "I'm Coming Virginia" shows that he could certainly be classified as a pioneer of the style that would later be called "cool jazz"

"I'm Coming Virginia":

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I've heard that too, fi. (Personally I thought the film *Young Man with a Horn* was rather over-wrought. And I could not stand the pretentious Lauren Bacall character.)

 

Change of pace: it's back to the 80s with Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark. I was never a big fan of theirs', too "electro-beat" for my tastes, but they did some catchy stuff. And it makes me feel nostalgic for the 80s when I hear this.

"If You Leave" :

 

 

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As a jazz musician the musical parts of Young Man with a Horn are very realistic. e.g. we often want to play for fellow musicians or ourselves and not for a know nothing audience.

 

As for the Lauren Bacall character; Well you just gave Bacall a compliment on her acting. One was suppose to dislike her character. But yea they should of cast Shelly Winters!

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Well, I wasn't commenting on Bacall's acting one way or the other, it was her character I found obnoxious.

Actually, I'm not sure if you were being ironic here; you say "one was supposed to like her character"', and since I most definitely did not, were you saying that in fact I was doing the opposite of complimenting her acting? (confusion emoticon: ?:| )

 

But in fact, I do not believe we are supposed to like Amy North. She's one of the most pretentious, shallow, self-obsessed, selfish, and ultimately boring people I've ever encountered in a movie.

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I dunno guys, I don't think Shelley Winters would have been right for the Amy North role at all.

There are, unfortunately, many different ways of being dislikeable.

Winters' was more of the clingy whiney insecure variety. Sort of the opposite of the Lauren Bacall character. Not saying Shelley Winters couldn't have played a dislikeable woman, she played many, but not the pretentious egotistical sort that Amy North was.

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Here's a song I associate with summer time. I don't know why, since apparently the album it's from was released in November (1972.) Maybe they didn't release the single until the spring or something.

Anyway, one day I was hanging out in my backyard, being a young 70s teenager and listening to my transistor radio which for a while I was never without, when this came on.

 

It knocked me out. I'd never heard anything like it. I was fascinated by its hints of decadence and a strange slightly dangerous world about which I knew nothing. I know this still gets played on "oldies" stations all the time, but with good reason.

Hey, babe...Take a Walk on the Wild Side.

 

 

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misswonderly said...

 

 

Here's a song I associate with summer time. I don't know why, since apparently the album it's from was released in November (1972.) Maybe they didn't release the single until the spring or something.

 

 

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It was released on a single in early 1973, hitting the American charts in February '73 (the stations that played it, that is...many more conservative stations skipped it.)

 

 

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