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Off Topic: Favorite Music?


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mockingbird, everytime I see your name on these boards I think of the song "Mockingbird Hill". Maybe if I post it here I'll get it out of my system.

I know it's kind of cheesey, but I've actually always liked this old song. It's got a really pretty and catchy melody. I picked this version because it's so uptempo. Also, it reminds me of an SNL sketch, a take off on Lawrence Welk or one of those shows. Kristen Wiig had wooden hands, or something.

 

 

There's also this, which rocks a little harder:

 

 

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I like both versions misswonderly. I actually have a Lennon Sisters Christmas album. Lawrence Welk takes me back to Sunday evenings (I think). My mom watched it. Very nostalgic for me. I actually like big band music too. I got used to hearing it when I worked in a retirement home. Then it grew on me.

James Taylor and Carly Simon version is a favorite, although I always think of the movie Vacation when I hear it. It's funny what sticks in a person's head. When I see lavenderblue, I hear Burl Ives singing it.

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This may be the best of ALL late'60s pop/rock singles. It sends chills down my spine.

Hey , I know that song. I had no idea who sang it. Always reminded me of Herman's Hermits. Don't ask me why. I hear it now and then on the radio.
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Hey , I know that song. I had no idea who sang it. Always reminded me of Herman's Hermits. Don't ask me why. I hear it now and then on the radio.

I believe the song was written by Paul Simon. The Cyrkle was composed of three students at Lafayette College in PA.

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I believe the song was written by Paul Simon. The Cyrkle was composed of three students at Lafayette College in PA.

 

Originally 4 were in the group, but one went into the Coast Guard.

 

Paul Simon didn't write 'Turn Down Day" - it was written by Jack Keller, who also wrote the Connie Francis hit 'Everybody's Somebody's Fool'.

 

However, Paul Simon did write The Cyrkle's first hit, which was 'Red Rubber Ball'. He also wrote another of their minor "hits" called 'I Wish You Could Be Here'.

 

One peculiarity of The Cyrkle's singles output was that every single they released charted progressively lower on the charts each and every time. They started with a #2 (Red Rubber Ball - which reached #1 in Canada), then a #16 (Turn Down Day), then a #59 (Please Don't Ever Leave Me - which did better in Canada, reaching #31), then a #70 (I Wish You Could Be Here - again doing better in Canada, reaching #46), then a #72 (We Had a Good Thing Goin'), then a # 95 (Penny Arcade), then a #112 (Turn of the Century).

 

Their final 2 singles ('Reading Her Paper' and 'Red Chair Fade Away') - both in 1968 - failed to register on the charts.

 

The name of the group - which had been The Rhondells - was changed to The Cyrkle at the suggestion of John Lennon, in keeping with alternative spellings that had begun with The Beatles (and continued with The Byrds)

 

I thought that 'Reading Her Paper' was a lovely, gentle and somewhat baroque composition that deserved a much better fate than to not even chart. I like it.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOVXJIlIbLk

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Originally 4 were in the group, but one went into the Coast Guard.

 

Paul Simon didn't write 'Turn Down Day" - it was written by Jack Keller, who also wrote the Connie Francis hit 'Everybody's Somebody's Fool'.

 

However, Paul Simon did write The Cyrkle's first hit, which was 'Red Rubber Ball'. He also wrote another of their minor "hits" called 'I Wish You Could Be Here'.

 

One peculiarity of The Cyrkle's singles output was that every single they released charted progressively lower on the charts each and every time. They started with a #2 (Red Rubber Ball - which reached #1 in Canada), then a #16 (Turn Down Day), then a #59 (Please Don't Ever Leave Me - which did better in Canada, reaching #31), then a #70 (I Wish You Could Be Here - again doing better in Canada, reaching #46), then a #72 (We Had a Good Thing Goin'), then a # 95 (Penny Arcade), then a #112 (Turn of the Century).

 

Their final 2 singles ('Reading Her Paper' and 'Red Chair Fade Away') - both in 1968 - failed to register on the charts.

 

The name of the group - which had been The Rhondells - was changed to The Cyrkle at the suggestion of John Lennon, in keeping with alternative spellings that had begun with The Beatles (and continued with The Byrds)

 

I thought that 'Reading Her Paper' was a lovely, gentle and somewhat baroque composition that deserved a much better fate than to not even chart. I like it.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOVXJIlIbLk

For a guy who doesn't do research, "close" is about the best I can expect.

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For anyone who cares, The Who is currently giving the Stones a run for their money as my all-time-favorite rock band. U2 is third, with the Beatles nowhere in sight. Others in my top ten include the Police, Pretenders, Squeeze,  and Talking Heads

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For anyone who cares, The Who is currently giving the Stones a run for their money as my all-time-favorite rock band. U2 is third, with the Beatles nowhere in sight. Others in my top ten include the Police, Pretenders, Squeeze, and Talking Heads

I heard on the radio the Stones are going to be in Pittsburgh this summer on tour. I have a hard time getting into U2. Don't know why. It's hard to list favorites, for me, but I narrowed it down to Stones, Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, Cream, Creedence, Boston, Neil Young and The Beatles.

Yeah, I love the Who. Damn shame about Keith Moon. I can't even choose a favorite of theirs.

I saw a documentary on Netflix called Beware of Mr. Baker, about Ginger, and Wow what a strange guy with a bad temper. But what a drummer and he loves his horses.

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This may be the best of ALL late'60s pop/rock singles. It sends chills down my spine.

 

Really?  "Turn Down Day" ? Are you serious?

 

It's one lame song. Sorry, everybody here who seems to love this deservedly obscure ephemeral 60's pop band, but The Cyrkle were pretty mediocre. Yes, they did have the one hit, "Red Rubber Ball". And it's a good song; that's  because it's penned by a great song-writer, Paul Simon.

Ok, full disclosure: I hadn't even heard of, let alone heard, any of the other Cyrkle tracks posted about with such fondness here. But I gave them each a careful listen, twice. And I just don't get it. Must be a pop 60s nostalgia thing or something.

 

"Reading Her Paper" was a sweet little song, and maybe did deserve at least to make the charts.

But overall, I can see why these guys were more or less forgotten, except for "Red Rubber Ball".

 

DGF:  "...may be the best of all _ 60s pop/rock singles."  Come on. What a hyperbolic statement. Especially when you think of all the undeniably great pop/rock singles that came out in the late 60s.  (Although, actually, "Turn Down Day" apparently came out in 1966, not sure I'd categorize that year as late '60s. But it stinks, whatever year it came out.)

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DGF:  "...may be the best of all _ 60s pop/rock singles."  Come on. What a hyperbolic statement. Especially when you think of all the undeniably great pop/rock singles that came out in the late 60s. 

 

Yep, the composition on 'Turn Down Day' actually began as a blues-workup novelty song. I don't dislike the poppy tune as much as you, and I kinda like the little sitar flourish in it, but I agree that it's a pretty ordinary mid-60's exercise.

 

The Cyrkle were really quite a lightweight outfit, and the steady decline of success that their singles would encounter was a pretty good barometer of that. I don't think they're anything like Herman's Hermits, as someone else seems to find. I'd say their closer in style to The Association - but with a whole lot less talent.

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Yep, the composition on 'Turn Down Day' actually began as a blues-workup novelty song. I don't dislike the poppy tune as much as you, and I kinda like the little sitar flourish in it, but I agree that it's a pretty ordinary mid-60's exercise.

 

The Cyrkle were really quite a lightweight outfit, and the steady decline of success that their singles would encounter was a pretty good barometer of that. I don't think they're anything like Herman's Hermits, as someone else seems to find. I'd say their closer in style to The Association - but with a whole lot less talent.

I probably should have clarified it a little better. What I meant to say was, whenever I heard "Turn Down Day", for some dumb reason Herman's Hermits always popped in my head. Maybe because I didn't know who the artist was.

I appreciate all the info about these lesser known artists. I was born in 66 and always preferred music from the 60's and 70's. Still do.

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Really?  "Turn Down Day" ? Are you serious?

 

It's one lame song. Sorry, everybody here who seems to love this deservedly obscure ephemeral 60's pop band, but The Cyrkle were pretty mediocre. Yes, they did have the one hit, "Red Rubber Ball". And it's a good song; that's  because it's penned by a great song-writer, Paul Simon.

Ok, full disclosure: I hadn't even heard of, let alone heard, any of the other Cyrkle tracks posted about with such fondness here. But I gave them each a careful listen, twice. And I just don't get it. Must be a pop 60s nostalgia thing or something.

 

"Reading Her Paper" was a sweet little song, and maybe did deserve at least to make the charts.

But overall, I can see why these guys were more or less forgotten, except for "Red Rubber Ball".

 

DGF:  "...may be the best of all _ 60s pop/rock singles."  Come on. What a hyperbolic statement. Especially when you think of all the undeniably great pop/rock singles that came out in the late 60s.  (Although, actually, "Turn Down Day" apparently came out in 1966, not sure I'd categorize that year as late '60s. But it stinks, whatever year it came out.)

I know whereof I speak. I've been spending a huge amount of time listening to youtubes to chose songs for my ipod. The other contenders for best late-'60s pop-rock single are "Along Comes Mary", the Turtles' "She's My Girl", the Zombies' "Tell Her No", and Paul Revere and the Raiders' 'Kicks". "Turn Down Day" creates a great mood, which as I said, sends chills down my spine. Of course, all of this is IMO. Notice that I'm leaving out the "H".

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Well, fi, maybe we can agree on this. Damn, this singer kicks a s s. The song heavily samples or copies the theme from "Austin Powers", but that's fine. Everyone looks like they're having fun.

 

Apparently it's a cover. I tried to find out about the original, who wrote it, etc., but got nowhere.

Regardless, as I said, this kicks a s s. So kick it and shake it, people:

 

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Well, fi, maybe we can agree on this. Damn, this singer kicks a s s. The song heavily samples or copies the theme from "Austin Powers", but that's fine. Everyone looks like they're having fun.

 

Apparently it's a cover. I tried to find out about the original, who wrote it, etc., but got nowhere.

Regardless, as I said, this kicks a s s. So kick it and shake it, people:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bzFbTFIttA

 

I like the girl wearing glasses.

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