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Off Topic: Favorite Music?


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She's endearingly nerdy, as is her partner.

The singer, on the other hand, is quite the babe. And what a voice !

 

Thanks for the Mott the Hoople tune, Vautrin. Kind of fun.

 

This being Easter Sunday, I thought I'd post a track from a great Miles Davis/ Gil Evans collaberation, Sketches of Spain.

The piece is called "Saeta", and here's a brief explanation of why it's Easter-ish: (from Wikipaedia)

 

"The saeta is best known for its mournful power during Holy Week in Spain.[4] The song is performed during the processions by religious confraternities that move slowly through the streets of cities and towns in southern Spain.[5][6] Possessing a plaintive emotional intensity, and dramatic charge, the saeta is sung by the saetero, often from a balcony, and may be addressed to the statue of Jesus below, in his agony on the Via Dolorosa, or to that of his suffering mother Mary.[7] These and other crafted statues are mounted on platforms and carried along the streets on the shoulders of several penitents who pass among the assembled public.[8] The immediate emotional response to the saeta, often of intense sorrow, may be the reason for its name, as the Spanish word saeta can mean "arrow or dart" (also "bud of a vine" or "hand of a clock" or "magnetic needle").[9] "

 

The first time I heard it, I thought was very eerie-sounding. Miles' trumpet is supposed to represent the voice of the woman singing about Christ's suffering. I love the trumpet fanfare at the beginning and end of the song. And the percussion on this is amazing.

 

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Really?  "Turn Down Day" ? Are you serious?

 

It's one lame song. Sorry, everybody here who seems to love this deservedly obscure ephemeral 60's pop band, but The Cyrkle were pretty mediocre. Yes, they did have the one hit, "Red Rubber Ball". And it's a good song; that's  because it's penned by a great song-writer, Paul Simon.

Ok, full disclosure: I hadn't even heard of, let alone heard, any of the other Cyrkle tracks posted about with such fondness here. But I gave them each a careful listen, twice. And I just don't get it. Must be a pop 60s nostalgia thing or something.

 

"Reading Her Paper" was a sweet little song, and maybe did deserve at least to make the charts.

But overall, I can see why these guys were more or less forgotten, except for "Red Rubber Ball".

 

DGF:  "...may be the best of all _ 60s pop/rock singles."  Come on. What a hyperbolic statement. Especially when you think of all the undeniably great pop/rock singles that came out in the late 60s.  (Although, actually, "Turn Down Day" apparently came out in 1966, not sure I'd categorize that year as late '60s. But it stinks, whatever year it came out.)

...and the category is "pop/rock", not "album rock, so you are by definition going to get lightweight songs in this category, and this song, like no other, takes me back to a pleasant summer day circa 1966.

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Well, fi, maybe we can agree on this. Damn, this singer kicks a s s. The song heavily samples or copies the theme from "Austin Powers", but that's fine. Everyone looks like they're having fun.

 

Apparently it's a cover. I tried to find out about the original, who wrote it, etc., but got nowhere.

Regardless, as I said, this kicks a s s. So kick it and shake it, people:

 

If I said that this song was "lame", that would be far too complimentary...........Na-na-na-na-na.

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...and the category is "pop/rock", not "album rock, so you are by definition going to get lightweight songs in this category, and this song, like no other, takes me back to a pleasant summer day circa 1966.

 

Well, that's nice that the song takes you back to a pleasant summer day circa 1966. I'm all for nostalgia.

"Turn Down Day" is not worth us getting into a big fight. If you like it, I'm glad for you.

There are lots of lightweight, perhaps even "lame" songs, that I like, and that make me feel nostalgic. But I wouldn't suggest that any of them  "Might be the best of all pop/rock singles", of any decade. It's not your fondness for the song I was taking issue with, it was your extreme and so obviously misguided claim about it.

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Well, that's nice that the song takes you back to a pleasant summer day circa 1966. I'm all for nostalgia.

"Turn Down Day" is not worth us getting into a big fight. If you like it, I'm glad for you.

There are lots of lightweight, perhaps even "lame" songs, that I like, and that make me feel nostalgic. But I wouldn't suggest that any of them  "Might be the best of all pop/rock singles", of any decade. It's not your fondness for the song I was taking issue with, it was your extreme and so obviously misguided claim about it.

If you're talking about the "best" pop/rock single of that period, a worthy candidate may be the Lovin' Spoonful's "Do You Believe in Magic", but I have a greater "fondness" (good word) for "Turn Down Day".

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Well, that's nice that the song takes you back to a pleasant summer day circa 1966. I'm all for nostalgia.

"Turn Down Day" is not worth us getting into a big fight. If you like it, I'm glad for you.

There are lots of lightweight, perhaps even "lame" songs, that I like, and that make me feel nostalgic. But I wouldn't suggest that any of them  "Might be the best of all pop/rock singles", of any decade. It's not your fondness for the song I was taking issue with, it was your extreme and so obviously misguided claim about it.

Getting in a fight over "Turn Down Day" seems somehow ironic. The day would become a "turn up day".

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Not that it matters all that much, but why are the Buzzcocks called

post-punk? They released their first two albums in 1978. Seems

pretty punk time to me, unless punk had a very short life cycle.

 

Protopunk, post-reggae, second generation garage.

Punk DID have a very short life. It morphed into New Wave. The harder edged new wave was known as post-punk. Most post-punk was in the '80s, and was slightly more mellow than punk. Post-punk groups included the Violent Femmes, Joy Division, and Gang of Four.

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I've always thought of punk and new wave as mostly separate

types of music that happened to become popular at about the

same time, not that one changed into the other. Apparently Joy

Division is considered post-punk. Time wise that's true, but I've

never thought of them that way. To each their own.

Any band in which the lead singer commits suicide definitely gets punk points.......Elvis Costello may be the artist who most served as the bridge between punk and new wave.

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  • 2 weeks later...

This is one of those unique old songs that everyone remembers (or should, if they have ears.) I love everything about it, the minor key, the moody arrangements, the bittersweet (but mostly bitter) lyrics. The melody is so - evocative, mysterious sounding.

 

Here's two versions, let me know, folks, which one you like best. (Unless of course you don't like either...) The definitive Julie London one:

 

 

 

and a much later interpretation by Diana Krall:

 

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Well, being the owner of a couple of Diana's cd's (though not the one that 'Cry Me a River' is on), I was probably pre-disposed to like her version better.

 

And I do.

 

Her voice is huskier. Julie's is breathier.

 

Boy, that Diana photographs well, doesn't she - that golden hair, those green eyes, that perfect skin, those gorgeous legs. Her album covers are sexier than even Carly Simon's were in the 70's. And much classier while being so.

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Just heard, Ben E. King has died. A great R & B singer. Here's the proof:

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGd6CdtOqEE

 

I know "Stand by Me" is the more obvious choice, and of course it's a great song. But "Spanish Harlem" is a particularly difficult melody to carry, and Ben pulls it off beautifully; it shows off his singing talent better.

 

Oh, what the frig. How can anyone resist "Stand by Me" ? Ok, a double song post:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwZNL7QVJjE

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Isn't Life Strange?, a lovely song by the Moody Blues. The only  thing I'm not sure I like about it is the way the singer wobbles his voice in the opening lines. Well, the "wobble" is some technical effect, not the actual singing. In any case, it's rather distracting.

Still, this is a beautiful, yearning melody.  KInd of Sunday night-ish, somehow.

 

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Kind of Sunday night-ish, somehow.

 

Ahh, yes. A seventh-day nightish feeling for the entire album, I think - an album called "Seventh Sojourn". Always the most peculiar album of theirs in its mood. 

 

Where side two had the benefit of closing with Lodge's 'I'm Just a Singer in a Rock and Roll Band' to bring the overall moroseness to a end (Lodge was also responsible for 'Isn't Life Strange?' which also closed side one - and these were the 2 songs that were released as singles, making 'Seventh Sojourn' the most successful album of the "original seven"), side one had no such upbeat moment to alleviate the thematic melancholy.

 

Side one closed with 'Isn't Life Strange?' and it had opened with this:

 

 

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Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young - Ohio

 

Young wrote in the liner notes for 'Decade' about this song, saying:

 

It's still hard to believe I had to write this song. It's ironic that I capitalized on the death of these American students. Probably the biggest lesson ever learned at an American place of learning. My best CSNY cut. Recorded totally live in Los Angeles. David Crosby cried after this take.

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"Ohio" is unquestionably a great song. There were a myriad of anti-war songs in the 60s and early 70s, of course. But the thing about  "Ohio" is, even without the lyrics, it's a compelling piece of music. What a fantastic intro, you've got Young's jagged, hypnotic riff, with Stephen Stills' lead guitar weaving in and out.  Miinor key and everything.

 

Silly but true story: I was just a kid when this came out on the radio, and as such, was only vaguely aware of the student protests in the States. For ages, I thought the chorus was "Oh, Daddy, Ohio", instead of "Four Dead in Ohio".

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