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MissGoddess

Off Topic: Favorite Music?

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I'm not so sure about the 'pound for pound' view. First that band had a lot of members and second some of them weren't thin. So in the aggregate their pounds were up there.

 

I would say Cream was the best talented group pound for pound! :)

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Damn, pturman, you played my favorite!

 

But I will not forget the first time I heard this one. I didn't even think much about even the word *Chicago* before 1968, but it has a: je ne sais quoi to me since then to now.

 

[Chicago|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XI5aD6m7ub0]

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> {quote:title=pturman wrote:}{quote}

> Pound for pound, just about the most talented band in the history of rock:

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> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=enzhOIzpdx0

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Great clip, pturman. How many famous "musicians" could sound this good live nowadays? Music in the 60's & 70's was so much better than the music of my generation. You actually had to be able to sing or play or write to be a famous musician. Now it's all corporate posers.

 

He speaks the language of a rebel

With his misinformed attack

He wears the clothes of a dissenter

But there's a logo on his back.

 

--Don Henley--

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In some cases the artist putting out music "in the old day" had more skills but in most cases there was still a corporate machine behind them. With the death today of Davy Jones, the Monkeys are an example of this. But even The Beatles were commercial (e.g. those collar less suits), but they had major skills.

 

There are artist today with those type of skills, one just has to seek them out.

 

Edited by: jamesjazzguitar on Feb 29, 2012 5:50 PM

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james, I agree with you 100% that there are just as many talented artists nowadays & that you have to go out & find them. Where we perhaps part company is if you don't agree with me that the music industry has changed for the worse. It used to be you DIDN'T have to go out & find them. The most talented artists are who got the record deals, got radio play, appeared on tv, etc. There are many reasons for this, the main one being the fact that the music business is just one branch of a larger corporation. Which means that the suits who decide who to promote aren't music lovers (as in days past), but bean counters. The artists you & I would chose to promote wouldn't stand a chance in today's corporate climate. Having talent almost works against you. Cream & Chicago would have a small, loyal following but would basically be wallowing in obscurity if they had gotten a record contract in 2006 & 2008 respectively instead of 1966 & 1968.

 

 

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> {quote:title=pturman wrote:}{quote}

> There are many reasons for this, the main one being the fact that the music business is just one branch of a larger corporation. Which means that the suits who decide who to promote aren't music lovers (as in days past), but bean counters.

Which is also why movies suck these days.

 

Boy, this thread's gone WAY off-topic!!

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I can't! I'm at work & don't have access to youtube (see other thread).

 

So you get to ignore my opinion instead.

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I don't think we really disagree here but just might view what is going on from a different angle.

 

You are right that in the 'old days' the record companies would seek out the talent and promote it, but that is what confused me in your initial approach since you mentioned that today the corporations run things. To me the corporations (most record companies are corporations, especially ones that promoted Rock acts), had more control over what we heard 'back in the day' than they do now. i..e. one couldn't get their song played on the radio unless they had a deal with a record company (again for rock, since country and blues acts could get some local airplay in limited areas).

 

With the Internet we have access to 'small' acts. This just wasn't possible in the old days except for local bands. Then record exec would pick up this local band and mode it into a major act. Note that Who record 'Sell Out'. My point, talent has had to 'sell out' in the old days just like they have to today, BUT today an artist does have the option of self-promotion via the internet.

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My paternal grandfather worked the logging camps as a cook in the Arrowhead region of Minnesota. That song captures the life I heard about very well. thanks for sharing.

 

It was the anniversary date for Johnny and June yesterday, that's why I posted it.

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Ever take a couple of cookies out of the box & they're so good you can't stop eating them?" Just can't get off Chicago!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by: pturman on Mar 2, 2012 8:30 PM

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One of my top favorite Chicago songs, one that is still fresh since (unlike stuff like "Saturday in the Park") it hasn't been beaten to death on oldies stations:

 

 

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I WORE OUT THOSE FIRST TWO ALBUMS! They were in terrible shape, and I no longer owned a turntable, yet I held onto them through the 1990s ! *Questions 67 and 68.* THANK YOU! Great song! I had forgotten how good that song was.

 

The whole world is watching..

 

This one did get a lot of play, but I still want to hear it again.

 

[Chicago|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUAYeN3Rp2E]

 

Listening to it again brings back such sweet memories; I would listen to this while studying for my finals in HS in 1970. My dad would be yelling upstairs for me to *"Turn that racket down! I can't sleep with that %*"*

 

Oh yes. Good times....

 

 

 

Edited by: casablancalover on Mar 3, 2012 8:35 AM

 

Edited by: casablancalover on Mar 3, 2012 8:41 AM

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Yeah, casablanca, your song was most people's introduction to Chicago at the time. And Terry Kath's solo on it is one of the best guitar solos ever recorded in rock. Period.

 

 

 

 

Funny you associating Chicago with your dad. I also associate Chicago with my dad but from the other end of the spectrum in a way. Cause he loved Chicago. The first memory of listening to music I have is when I was about five or something & dad listening to Chicago in the living room on his "hi-fi." In particular, this song is the first song I ever remember listening to. I coulda done a helluva lot worse.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUrY1uqTBCQ

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Speaking of my dad... He used to tell all my little friends he was Glenn Miller, the bandleader. He was a terrible tease at times.

 

For dad:

 

[Glenn Miller|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDnKaHHe0Rw]

 

[People Like You and Me|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekH4uRSWbCE]

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> {quote:title=casablancalover wrote:

> }{quote}Speaking of my dad... He used to tell all my little friends he was Glenn Miller, the bandleader. He was a terrible tease at times.

>

> For dad:

>

>

> [People Like You and Me|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekH4uRSWbCE]

>

"People Like You and Me" - ! - Thanks!

Quite possbly my all-time TOP fave Glenn Miller performance!! (and I'm a big fan, got hundreds of records by them so it's not easy to pick one favorite!)

And they never even recorded it for record (Bluebird or Victor), only for the film soundtrack of ORCHESTRA WIVES.

 

You mentioned your Dad's Glenn Miller connection...well I have one, too - I'm very proud that my uncle was a writer/arranger for Glenn Miller (& others before & after his time with Glenn) but his Miller connection is what I think is so cool. I still always get a little thrill seeing his name on the records. After getting out of The Service he went with Tommy Dorsey, then in the early 1950's started his own band which was very successful.

 

He passed away in June of 2008 at age 91. He was a very interesting and nice guy. And very smart about lots of other things in addition to music.

I went to his funeral. Many of his surviving old bandmates were there. Oh, the stories those old guys told! I wish I could have recorded them!

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There are little things that happen that we look back upon as being tipping points in our lives.

 

>musicalnovelty wrote: And they never even recorded it for record (Bluebird or Victor), only for the film soundtrack of ORCHESTRA WIVES.

 

I had a two disc album of 33 1/4 LP on the Bluebird Label. Really, *Scout's honor!* It could have been RCA with retro Bluebird label, I don't remember. It was titiled: Remember Glenn

 

The recordings included:

 

[boom Shot|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=biSDz16Dlvo]

People Like You and Me

[it Happened in Sun Valley|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5YnqeoH7uI]

Measure for Measure

[sun Valley Jump|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6ELPvxKlBE]

 

Songs I never had heard before (I hadn't seen Orchestra Wives or Sun Valley Serenade yet) and haven't heard since rediscovering them on youtube. The recordings were remastered in high fidelity, that much I know, Just try to explain to a kid today the incredible richness of that sound!

 

There was a another song I cannot recall the title to, that featured a fantastic drum solo, and there were Full Production versions of Chattanooga Choo-Choo and I've Got a Gal in Kalamazoo,which we never seem to hear anymore. It contained pristine recordings of their best hits, maybe some 20+ songs in al, but I only found 18 mentioned, from Moonlight Serenade to St Louis Blues March.

 

So what happened to that album? The man I was married to at the time was insisting we get rid of those things that we didn't have use for anymore. Since we no longer had a turntable, nor did it seem I would ever see that technology again. So, I turned the recording over to one of those record buying stores that were popping up in the Midwest at the time. I needed the money. It was minor philosophically at the time, but that became a gulf..

 

I will find more of the songs,

 

post.gif

 

Edited by: casablancalover on Mar 4, 2012 10:57 AM

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Another one

That's Sabotage

 

 

 

[bugle Call Rag|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCCP8ZKY5i4]

 

Edited by: casablancalover on Mar 4, 2012 11:07 AM

 

Edited by: casablancalover on Mar 4, 2012 11:22 AM, for she knew she could find the lost recording..

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> {quote:title=casablancalover wrote:}{quote}

>

> > musicalnovelty wrote:

> > And they never even recorded it for record (Bluebird or Victor), only for the film soundtrack of ORCHESTRA WIVES.I had a two disc album of 33 1/4 LP on the Bluebird Label. Really, *Scout's honor!* It could have been RCA with retro Bluebird label, I don't remember. It was titiled: Remember Glenn

>

> The recordings included:

>

> [boom Shot|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=biSDz16Dlvo]

> People Like You and Me

> [it Happened in Sun Valley|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5YnqeoH7uI]

> Measure for Measure

> [sun Valley Jump|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6ELPvxKlBE]

>

> Songs I never had heard before (I hadn't seen Orchestra Wives or Sun Valley Serenade yet) and haven't heard since rediscovering them on youtube. The recordings were remastered in high fidelity, that much I know, Just try to explain to a kid today the incredible richness of that sound!

>

> There was a another song I cannot recall the title to, that featured a fantastic drum solo, and there were Full Production versions of Chattanooga Choo-Choo and I've Got a Gal in Kalamazoo,which we never seem to hear anymore. It contained pristine recordings of their best hits, maybe some 20+ songs in al, but I only found 18 mentioned, from Moonlight Serenade to St Louis Blues March.

>

 

RCA issued several double LP's of Glenn Miller recordings, with the Bluebird label recreated. "People Like You and Me" was not on any of those albums because it wasn't ever released on a Bluebird 78.

 

I have the album you pictured and it's made up of all soundtrack recordings from Glenn's two 20th Century-Fox movies. So, yes, the song is on that album. That's not an RCA or Bluebird album, but 20th Century-Fox Records. They reissued that material several times (earlier and later than the album you pictured) sometimes leasing it to cheapo labels like (I think, without going to look at one) Springboard, etc.

They did the same for other artists who made 20th Century-Fox films: they released LP's of soundtrack material. These included bands such as Tommy Dorsey and of course, Shirley Temple (again, in numerous reissues).

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