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Hubert de Givenchy has died


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1 hour ago, Stephan55 said:

 

Sometimes the acuity of our "sniffers" changes with age. :unsure:
Some folks I know will say that the food that they used to really enjoy, no longer tastes the same as it used to.
I am not a connoisseur of perfumes, so I really don't know, perhaps the industry is trying to economize by using cheaper artificial chemicals as opposed to real floral extracts. That wouldn't surprise me a bit either. :(

I can assure you Stephan, the L'Interdit that's being sold today is not the same as the original, so it has nothing to do with how my sniffer has changed. I do agree that with age our taste buds do change, however again as with perfumes, foods are loaded with processed junk and chemicals, so that I agree with you, companies are using cheaper artifiical chemicals so that foods and perfumes, etc just aren't as good as they use to be.

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9 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

I can assure you Stephan, the L'Interdit that's being sold today is not the same as the original, so it has nothing to do with how my sniffer has changed. I do agree that with age our taste buds do change, however again as with perfumes, foods are loaded with processed junk and chemicals, so that I agree with you, companies are using cheaper artifiical chemicals so that foods and perfumes, etc just aren't as good as they use to be.

I'll have to accept your word (and your "sniffer") on that one, I couldn't even spell "L'Interdit" (let alone pronounce it)... Glad I never went for the really classy dames that had a yen for perfumes by name. :)
I had a friend that received a bad knock on his noggin, nothing smelled or tasted the same for him after that. We used to take advantage of his inability to smell anything nasty at times (I know, we were very naughty).

You are so correct about food... I have become a compulsive label reader and it is ever more difficult to find food on U.S. shelves that has not been unhealthily adulterated in one form or another. That is the pitfall of big agro,  chemical and pharmaceutical corporations ganging up on the consumer market. That fused with the advent of genetic patents and modifications... It is certainly a "brave new world" we live in.  :huh:
Just try asking any grocer, produce or meat manager (heck, anyone in any dept.) about where their "fresh" product comes from. Most don't have the faintest. Same in any restaurant I've eaten at (and actually inquired).
However, I'm sure that there are a few exceptions to that, even today... perhaps in some specialty stores, farmers and whole food markets. Or if you are fortunate enough to either grow your own food, or actually know the person(s) (and the land) which produce it for you.
I'll bet that a few of you classy ladies have been to some of those really fine, high end places where they could tell you the life history and family lineage of your steak, if you asked. ;)

I read an interesting book by Jeremy Rifkin in the early 90's: Beyond Beef: The Rise and Fall of the Cattle Culture. It was quite an eye opener. In it (among other interesting things) he talked about the roots of the "modern" grain fed cattle industry in Victorian England. He discussed how prize steers with prime lineage were paraded about and later served to upper class who could afford to eat a piece of meat with a name, while the majority of working poor were "privileged" to watch and salivate, lucky to afford a treat of "umbles" every now and then. I've read several other exposes by Rifkin, and others, and was stimulated to reread Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, and The Jungle by Upton Sinclair. :ph34r:

I was traveling in Europe one summer on the cheap, and shared a hostel for a few days with a young bio engineer (also from the states) who worked for "Monsatanto". He shared that he loved the pay and benefits, but otherwise had some rather frightening things (to me) to say about his company. I've also periodically dealt with pharmaceutical reps, and found that the profit motivated "business end" of that "industry" can be quite ruthless. 
I fondly remember the non-GMO days when I could feel good about eating an ear of corn (and practically anything else). I grew up in a time when the worst thing we had to concern ourselves with (when grocery shopping) was DDT laced food. And I can sadly remember when MacDonald's and Taco Bell actually served real cheese on their burgers and tacos... And when "milk shakes" were actually made with... milk!

Sorry for leading this thread further astray... from the passing of a clothing designer (whose name I would never have recognized) to name brand clothing, to the degeneration of name brand perfumes.... 
I really have no business posting on such a thread in the first place. :unsure:
My apologies to the OP.

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On 3/12/2018 at 8:03 PM, speedracer5 said:

Costume design is an art form in and of itself.  There are so many iconic costumes in classic film.  It takes talent to not only construct the actual movie itself, but to actually bring it to life with great costuming.

When I watch classic movies, I always wonder what happened to all the costumes and set pieces.  I imagine most of them were just packed back into a warehouse somewhere ready to be used on another film.  I am curious as to whether costumes from a big film, say Gone With the Wind, were purposely saved after the filming ended in 1939, or whether they just happened to survive until someone found them buried in a warehouse somewhere.  

it's a sad story, but costumes and props from MGM films (at least, the ones Wallace Beery didn't steal, but that's another story) were inventoried and stored pretty meticulously up until the studio was sold in the late 60's (early 70's?)

there was a huge auction and a lot of the backlot was torn down, 60 MINUTES did a heartbreaking segment on it, you can prolly find it on youtube.

 if there were such a thing as a PATRON SAINT OF CLASSIC MOVIE COSTUME AND PROP PRESERVATION it would be none other than MISS DEBBIE REYNOLDS- who bought numerous pieces from MGM films at the initial auction and continued to collect, donate and show them over the years. i know she owned a lot of items from THE WIZARD OF OZ and loaned them to an amusement park in North Carolina for a while.

 

FYI- MGM reused some of the gowns from GONE WITH THE WIND in PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, or so I've heard.

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

the most satisfying sexless marriage of all time:

eec2237dc5c4666d6ed834387a33f4a4--best-w

I don't know about that. Loretta Young's last husband was the man who designed all those beautiful outfits she swung through the door in--Jean Louis.

And Janet Gaynor "somehow" had one son with the great MGM costume designer Adrian.

And Then there was Cary Grant and Orry- Kelly, And Don Loper and Vincente Minnelli.

 

This is a very exciting thread.

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lavenderblue said: WOW! Never knew that.

Yeah, me neither. Very interesting!

Perfumes are so cheaply made now. More chemicals and manufactured scents.

What ARE perfumes made of?
I always thought they are alcohol based with added synthetic chemical combinations which is why they age badly. They are best when fresh, so always buy the smallest size.
I once had to take a course in basic perfumes when a visual merchandiser, it was quite fascinating.

And btw, I saw this in person-it was lovely even on a blank mannequin. Just gorgeous quality work. Audrey-Wore-Glamorous-Givenchy-Gown-Sabrina.JPG

and don't forget, Givenchy also designed for Jackie Kennedy. As a small stature woman, I appreciate the lines of the classic White House "Jackie" style. Laura Petrie's look was the suburban housewife version of Givenchy's Jackie.

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2 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I don't know about that. Loretta Young's last husband was the man who designed all those beautiful outfits she swung through the door in--Jean Louis.

And Janet Gaynor "somehow" had one son with the great MGM costume designer Adrian.

And Then there was Cary Grant and Orry- Kelly, And Don Loper and Vincente Minnelli.

 

This is a very exciting thread.

LOL. I dont think the last 2 combinations were sexless though.......

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47 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

lavenderblue said: WOW! Never knew that.

Yeah, me neither. Very interesting!

Perfumes are so cheaply made now. More chemicals and manufactured scents.

What ARE perfumes made of?
I always thought they are alcohol based with added synthetic chemical combinations which is why they age badly. They are best when fresh, so always buy the smallest size.
I once had to take a course in basic perfumes when a visual merchandiser, it was quite fascinating.

And btw, I saw this in person-it was lovely even on a blank mannequin. Just gorgeous quality work. Audrey-Wore-Glamorous-Givenchy-Gown-Sabrina.JPG

and don't forget, Givenchy also designed for Jackie Kennedy. As a small stature woman, I appreciate the lines of the classic White House "Jackie" style. Laura Petrie's look was the suburban housewife version of Givenchy's Jackie.

 

Where did you see the dress???

I'm far from an expert, but the old perfume houses used perfume oils and scents from the flowers (very expensive) like roses, jasmine, ylang ylang etc. Now they cut corners with synthetic ingredients.....

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Hibi asked Where did you see the dress???

In a museum exhibit of John LeBold's great costume collection. Also included were the black Gilda dress, Marilyn's gold dress from GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES and a Scarlett GWTW gown. It was amazing to see them in person to see their size & construction. (Rita Hayworth was tiny, like Veronica Lake tiny)

Re Perfume: I imagine concentrated essences of real flowers must be expensive. I would think however, synthetic oils would be more stablized for mass producing perfumes. You'd also think it would be cheaper if made with cheaper ingredients.
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I'm reminded of the scene in The Best Years of Our Lives where Dana Andrews shows Teresa Wright a bottle of perfume at, I think $2.95 and tells her it's a rip-off at half the price.

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Hibi asked Where did you see the dress???

In a museum exhibit of John LeBold's great costume collection. Also included were the black Gilda dress, Marilyn's gold dress from GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES and a Scarlett GWTW gown. It was amazing to see them in person to see their size & construction. (Rita Hayworth was tiny, like Veronica Lake tiny)

Re Perfume: I imagine concentrated essences of real flowers must be expensive. I would think however, synthetic oils would be more stablized for mass producing perfumes. You'd also think it would be cheaper if made with cheaper ingredients.

WOW. Did you take pictures?

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It was infuriating, Hibi. NO PHOTOS and there were guards in every room!

I have the world's worst memory & knew everything seen would be forgotten within a year. (a great quality to have as a classic movie fan-every movie is "new")

Luckily, there was a map of the exhibit, with descriptions which I often refer to to jog my memory. I made sure to talk a lot about the details with MrTiki to try making some mental "markers" when viewing each exhibit. 

Definite highlights were Errol's Don Juan costume-so tall and perfectly proportioned, Bogart's suit from the Maltese Falcon was exactly the same size as Mr Tiki's clothing, and Liz Taylor and MM were both a modern junior size 5, Rita Hayworth a jr3. Really.

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On 3/14/2018 at 3:32 PM, TikiSoo said:

lavenderblue said: WOW! Never knew that.

Yeah, me neither. Very interesting!

Perfumes are so cheaply made now. More chemicals and manufactured scents.

What ARE perfumes made of?
I always thought they are alcohol based with added synthetic chemical combinations which is why they age badly. They are best when fresh, so always buy the smallest size.
I once had to take a course in basic perfumes when a visual merchandiser, it was quite fascinating.

And btw, I saw this in person-it was lovely even on a blank mannequin. Just gorgeous quality work. Audrey-Wore-Glamorous-Givenchy-Gown-Sabrina.JPG

and don't forget, Givenchy also designed for Jackie Kennedy. As a small stature woman, I appreciate the lines of the classic White House "Jackie" style. Laura Petrie's look was the suburban housewife version of Givenchy's Jackie.

That's my favorite.  I like it in B&W, but wondering if it looked like that in real life.  I think that dress as a B&W print would be great.

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On 3/13/2018 at 3:04 PM, Stephan55 said:

Well, when you put it that way, maybe you are right.
But if our avatars are supposed to be a "reflection" of our personalities, then I am now truly confused by what I am seeing?????? :o:huh::blink::wacko::unsure:

Mine is just like me...tall, dark, handsome, upright member of society.

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

It was infuriating, Hibi. NO PHOTOS and there were guards in every room!

I have the world's worst memory & knew everything seen would be forgotten within a year. (a great quality to have as a classic movie fan-every movie is "new")

Luckily, there was a map of the exhibit, with descriptions which I often refer to to jog my memory. I made sure to talk a lot about the details with MrTiki to try making some mental "markers" when viewing each exhibit. 

Definite highlights were Errol's Don Juan costume-so tall and perfectly proportioned, Bogart's suit from the Maltese Falcon was exactly the same size as Mr Tiki's clothing, and Liz Taylor and MM were both a modern junior size 5, Rita Hayworth a jr3. Really.

OH, BROTHER! I wonder why they didnt allow photos? Afraid people would try to copy the dresses? LOL!

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Flash photography probably does a number on the delicate fabrics.  Not your one flash, but the millions it would ultimately get over the years.

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Well, in this case a flash would do far less harm than the spotlights directly on the clothing. Many museums allow non-flash photos, but I'm sure 90% of people don't know how to turn the flash off. And this exhibit was only there for a very short time, like a month. What was notable about some of the costumes was they were only "half there" meaning they were just pinned fabric in the back never meant to be photographed all the way around. A dress Betty Hutton wore in THE PERILS OF PAULINE was like that.

MrTiki & I watched some movie on TCM last week and I saw the guy in your avatar, MovieCollectorOhio. I recognised him right away and yelled out, "It's MOVIE COLLECTOR OHIO!" and received a weird look. I then had to explain. He was in the next movie too-he's adorable.

And we will be visiting Charles Coburn's grave in October. I instantly thought of Fedya while plotting that trip out. I like when I can connect an avatar to a poster's personality.
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