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Hubert de Givenchy has died


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16 hours ago, Fedya said:

Flash photography probably does a number on the delicate fabrics.  Not your one flash, but the millions it would ultimately get over the years.

I see.

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Well, in this case a flash would do far less harm than the spotlights directly on the clothing. Many museums allow non-flash photos, but I'm sure 90% of people don't know how to turn the flash off. And this exhibit was only there for a very short time, like a month. What was notable about some of the costumes was they were only "half there" meaning they were just pinned fabric in the back never meant to be photographed all the way around. A dress Betty Hutton wore in THE PERILS OF PAULINE was like that.

MrTiki & I watched some movie on TCM last week and I saw the guy in your avatar, MovieCollectorOhio. I recognised him right away and yelled out, "It's MOVIE COLLECTOR OHIO!" and received a weird look. I then had to explain. He was in the next movie too-he's adorable.

And we will be visiting Charles Coburn's grave in October. I instantly thought of Fedya while plotting that trip out. I like when I can connect an avatar to a poster's personality.

 

LOL!!!

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6 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Audrey Hepburn had such a distinctive look in her films - and that look was spelled - Hubert de Givenchy.

I call that "distinctive look" anorexia.

 Audrey grew up during World War II in the Netherlands and I don't think they had a proper food Supply at that time.

 This may have physically affected  the way she looked later in life and it may have also psychologically influenced the way she looked later in life.

During the winter of 1944 when Audrey was 15, the Netherlands was hit by a Nazi blockade causing a Dutch famine, which resulted in malnutrition for Audrey and subsequent problems with acute anemia and edema.

Not having grown up in a Third Reich war zone nor having ever been a victim of a famine, I'm not in a position to  judge the appearance of Audrey Hepburn later in life. Also, I can imagine these horrible teenage experiences would have an impact psychologically and physically on her for the rest of her life.

That may be one of the reasons why she became so involved with UNICEF after retiring from Motion Pictures.

She helped to publicize and direct UNICEF relief to children from third world countries in South America, Asia and Africa.

In 1992 before her death in 1993, she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom for her contribution to UNICEF and to children all over the world.

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Audrey did not suffer from anorexia. Both her sons dispute this and they should know. She loved to cook and she loved food. The younger son published a book of her recipes and his memories of her in the kitchen and elsewhere a few years ago.

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23 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

 Audrey grew up during World War II in the Netherlands and I don't think they had a proper food Supply at that time.

 This may have physically affected  the way she looked later in life and it may have also psychologically influenced the way she looked later in life.

During the winter of 1944 when Audrey was 15, the Netherlands was hit by a Nazi blockade causing a Dutch famine, which resulted in malnutrition for Audrey and subsequent problems with acute anemia and edema.

Not having grown up in a Third Reich war zone nor having ever been a victim of a famine, I'm not in a position to  judge the appearance of Audrey Hepburn later in life. Also, I can imagine these horrible teenage experiences would have an impact psychologically and physically on her for the rest of her life.

That may be one of the reasons why she became so involved with UNICEF after retiring from Motion Pictures.

She helped to publicize and direct UNICEF relief to children from third world countries in South America, Asia and Africa.

In 1992 before her death in 1993, she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom for her contribution to UNICEF and to children all over the world.

Not to mention the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Oscar award (she died before she could accept it).

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

Not to mention the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Oscar award (she died before she could accept it).

I have that on my YouTube  collection of videos for Audrey Hepburn. 

Her oldest son, Sean Ferrer, who looked a great deal like her, accepted the award.

You couldn't help but be moved by his sincere love for his mother.

You can find the tribute from the 1993 Academy Awards with a beautiful Video Clip of her greatest movies, narrated and presented by Gregory Peck.

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On 3/16/2018 at 3:22 PM, rayban said:

Audrey Hepburn had such a distinctive look in her films - and that look was spelled - Hubert de Givenchy.

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For those who speak French, Audrey may be one of the few great movie stars who did interviews completely in French.

Also on YouTube you will find a number of her French interviews, particularly interesting were those  she made while filmng "Funny Face"  in Paris with Fred Astaire.

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Sorry if my comment offended anyone here. I am well aware of Hepburn's childhood experiences during the war and it's effect on her. She actually hid in the dirt under a foundation and sneaked out to steal bread & water for over two weeks, if I recall correctly. Her mettle was impressive and she is to be admired for her many achievements.
Maybe she wasn't anorexic, but her look is.

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No offense taken. But for women trying for that look, I agree, it's not the norm, and many women do develop eating disorders trying to achieve it.

I believe she was living on grass and raw turnips when she was in hiding. She and her mother were trapped in the Arnhem debacle. (A Bridge Too Far)......

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Since we're being honest about movies we dislike in other threads today, I'll mention that I very much dislike Breakfast at Tiffany's, on pretty much every level, from the bland Peppard, to the offensive Mickey Rooney, to the dopey lead character. I fail to see the charm or allure in any of it. It would rank near the top of my personal "Most Overrated Movie" list, but to be honest I always forget about it when have those types of threads going.

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41 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Since we're being honest about movies we dislike in other threads today, I'll mention that I very much dislike Breakfast at Tiffany's, on pretty much every level, from the bland Peppard, 

*to the offensive Mickey Rooney,*

 

to the dopey lead character. I fail to see the charm or allure in any of it. It would rank near the top of my personal "Most Overrated Movie" list, but to be honest I always forget about it when have those types of threads going.

 

One actor who I think absolutely steals this movie is Buddy Ebsen. He plays Holly's first, very rustic husband.

It's a similar characterization to Jed Clampett, but gutsy dramatic - - similar to what Andy Griffith did with A Face in the Crowd in relationship to his character of Andy Taylor on TV.

The most wrenching scene to me in the movie is the look on Ebsen's face when that Greyhound bus pulls out and he's just staring at Audrey Hepburn.

My other favorite character in the movie is Martin Balsam. He plays the Hollywood producer to the max for the max in comedy--

a little bit of a departure for him from his most famous 60s role in Psycho.

And next to Holly Golightly those were my two favorite characters in the movie.

 

*I've already mentioned on another thread how Mickey Rooney doesn't belong in this movie on any level. I just have to say  his characterization is so bad and disgusting that it's an all-time Camp High.*

 

But still it's Franz Planer 's cinematography on that street in front of Tiffany's and Henry Mancini's score, which carries

Audrey Hepburn into Cinema eternity.

 

BTW-- if you think the screenplay is convoluted and confusing, you should read Truman Capote's original story.

Note: The character Holly Golightly was based in part on Truman Capote's mother and a well-known Broadway dancer.

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Note: The character Holly Golightly was based in part on Truman Capote's mother and a well-known Broadway dancer.

Funnier that the Peppard charactor was based on Capote himself! Being a Capote fan, I'll admit, he was a very handsome man in his youth, much like Peppard. But in no way was Capote ever so grounded & serene a personality as Peppard depicted in the movie. Ludicrous!

I hated BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S the first few times I saw it, but since have loosened my judgement somewhat. I think most modern viewers are more mesmerized by Golightly's antics and fashions of the era than the story itself. (Givenchy did a marvelous job)
It's worst aspect though is the upstairs neighbor played by Rooney. It's so jarring it burns itself into your brain and almost impossible to ignore or forget. If only it could somehow be edited out.
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Audrey Hepburn was - a poem.

I read Sean Ferrer's pictorial book on his mother, which could not have been more loving.

I have several picture books on her, too.

She was a unique presence on the movie screen.

After "Wait Until Dark", she left the screen for a number of years.

These were sad years for her fans.

I have two photos of her on my living room wall.

I do not want to forget her.

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