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Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye


kimpunkrock
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This is a Cagney picture that came out right after White Heat in 1950. The two characters are a like in a way, whereas they are both a little nuts. I have never seen this one on TCM, but I bought the video from a video store for a dollar.

 

This film seemed to have been made to capitalize on Cagney's success in White Heat. It is almost as if Cody Jarrett reincarnates as Ralph Cotter. There is also some great scenes with Ward Bond as a crooked head detective of police. He even gets to slap Cagney around. I do not ever remember Bond and Cagney even doing a picture together besides Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye. I could be wrong but it seemed as if he starred with some of these supporting acting staples for the first time in this picture.

 

Other great supporting actors in this films are:

 

William Frawley

John Littel

Barton Maclane

Kenneth Tobey

 

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0042648/

 

 

Has anyone else out there seen this film?

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Hi Kimpunkrock,

 

I've seen this film, although it was a long time ago. I agree with all the points you made, especially about the similarities to White Heat (frankly, a much superior film to this one). As for the supporting actors in the movie, to my knowledge, Cagney made one other movie with one of the people you listed: Barton MacLane, (always a terrific character actor) co-starred in G-Men with Cagney (1935).

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Magnavoice I have no idea what you are talking about. TCM plays all of those genres daily. I think you need a pair of glasses. Also your response had nothing at all to do with my thread. If you have nothing to say about Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye, go somewhere else and post.

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Barton MacLane had an amazing set of careers in front of the camera. I first remembered him as the bully detective to Bogart in MALTESE FALCON with Ward Bond stepping between them after MacLane landed a cheap-shot.

 

Then, going backwards or forward on his filmography, there are strong performances throughout.

 

But I'd be ashamed to admit how long it was before I realized, "OH MY GOSH - that's the same MacLane as I DREAM OF JEANNIE'S General Peterson?!!" Oh well - what can I say? I stopped watching that show as a kid, and didn't discover Bogart & Company until junior high and on.

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Nice to know there are some people who remember a terrific character actor such as MacLane. Seems he played the heavy in just about every movie he was ever in, but he did it so well. One other favorite role of mine (in a relatively small part): The crooked employer who tries to screw Tim Holt and Bogie out of their wages at the beginning of Treasure of the Sierra Madre. . .until they teach him a rather painful lesson and get their money.

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There is a lot about this film I should like. The supporting cast is outstanding - Ward Bond has an amazing role - cruel and evil, then when backed into a corner, he doesn't fight - he gives up and almost cowers. He thinks about fighting back, but only when he's figured out that he's next on the To Die list.

 

Steve Brodie's got a fairly hefty role, but I can't think of him ever playing such a weak character in such a big role - he's usually the guy doing the pushing and threatening, and here, he's been flipped over and is the one waffling around.

 

William Frawley's appearance over fairly quickly, but there's no overlooking him.

 

Barton MacLane plays a distant 2nd fiddle to Bond - heck, maybe even 4th chair. That's surprising to me.

 

And Kenneth Tobey, too - an almost shockingly small role.

 

Yet, this could be my MAD MAD MAD MAD CRIME film - just so many of my favorites in the cast, and maybe just not enough good roles or lines of dialog for everyone.

 

No one's "bad" in the film, but they all play a fairly different-than-expected character type - Ward Bond starts tough and is cowered - and appropriately. Steve Brodie, too. MacLane and Tobey - practically silenced. For that, I suspect My Expectation Levels may cause me to degrade this film.

 

But after many rewatchings, there are other problems.

 

An earlier mention of Cagney's reliance on the WHITE HEAT success seems correct. And I think the attempts at relying on Cody Jarrett is "too much" and "incorrectly done". There was no reason for the dialog to ever veer off into questions of Cotter's sanity, and when someone says Cagney's crazy, I think this film would have been better served without his violent denials. "Laugh it off, Cotter, and let's move on" would have been better advice for the script, I think.

 

And the dialog came close to doing that: when the Cotter Gang proposes to knock off the Mob bagmen, Ward Bond causes a big scene against it. Cagney shuts him up by saying, "Oh yeah, and just remember YOU were the copper who thought he could take me at first, but look who turned the tables?"

 

Cagney's right. His chess-moves have been just about perfect - taking enemies and forcing them into alliances. And he does it time after time - in fact, every time but the last moment.

 

I might complain this film is too cluttered with the "other woman" and her rich dad, but when Cagney's talking about getting the other woman's money thru marriage, and being rich - well, as Judy Tenuda used to say, "It could happen!"

 

Instead of "cluttered", I think "rushed" is the better complaint. I wondered if Rich Ol' Dad wasn't really the Mobster himself. Coulda been pretty interesting, eh?

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MacLane is great in the Treasure of the Sierra Madre. That movie is great all around. Barton was in so many great films. His listing at IMDB.com is impressive. I always enjoy any movie that he is in.

 

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0533692/

 

TCM should play Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye. I wonder who has the rights to it.

 

Ward Bond holds the film together in a way.

 

Ollie I enjoyed your comment on the film.

thanks for the great posting.

 

-

kim

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I've been thinking this could be my favorite Ward Bond performance. He's more enjoyable in other roles, perhaps, but this is a powerhouse performance for a supporting actor.

 

I was shocked to see him be the railroad rapist in WILD BOYS OF THE ROAD (Ward was 30 at the time), and I'm always sorry he doesn't get some film-credit for IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT. After all, he's the first bus driver! The one that gets the trip started!

 

(I'm looking thru his IMDB's and I couldn't find any top-billings for him until he gets to TV's WAGON TRAIN. Well, he was an excellent supporting cast member in so many of these. And he's in a dozen classic films - from MALTESE to THEY WERE EXPENDABLE to MISTER ROBERTS, THEY MADE ME A CRIMINAL, even BRINGING UP BABY, SON OF FRANKENSTEIN and TOPPER.)

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I could not agree more with you about Ward Bond. He keeps Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye interesting.

 

It is hard to believe he was uncredited for "It Happened One Night".---strange days indeed.

 

What about Wagon Master? was he top billed in that?

Seems like he should of been.

 

-

kpr

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I thought KISS TOMORROW GOODBYE, while not even close to as good as WHITE HEAT, was such a good flick though, and for me kind of a hidden treasure, I was really happy to discover this one and check it out!

 

And Barton MacLane, wow! One of my all-time faves! Yes, he often played the heavy or a cop, and as mentioned, he was General Petersen on I DREAM OF JEANNE, which I loved, and thought he was the BEST General on that series, the funniest by far! One of my favorite roles of his was the recurring one in the series "Torchy Blane". I thought he and Glenda Farrell had great chemistry!

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TCM should play Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye. I wonder who has the rights to it.

 

This is another one of those non-Republic films (like Good Sam) that somehow ended up in Republic's hands by the home-video era. It's likely with CBS Television or Paramount for syndication and now Lionsgate for home video, although Republic issued a VHS and (before exiting the scene) a DVD.

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