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Recording Movies on TCM onto DVD


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Having recently purchased a DVD recorder, I?m not quite sure of how to figure out which movies airing on TMC are copyguard ?protected, which would make it impossible to record them onto a blank DVD disc. (My understanding is that the movies could still be recorded onto videotape, however.)

 

Are the following two general rules of thumb?

 

1. If a movie is from the ?60s or more recent, it?s highly likely that it is copyguard-protected and cannot be recorded onto DVD. (However, I should say that I was able to successfully record ?The Outrage,? which is from 1964, a few weeks ago.)

 

2. If an older movie is immediately preceded on the Turner schedule by a movie from the ?60s or more recent, it is highly likely that the copyguard protection will still be in place and therefore prevent you from recording the older film. (For example, yesterday I had tried to record the short subject ?The Battle of Gettysburg? [1955], but it was preceded on the schedule by ?Hawaii? [1966], so it couldn?t be recorded. And this morning I had tried to record ?The Sin of Madelon Claudet? [1931], but it was preceded on the schedule by ?The Whisperers? [1967], so it couldn?t be recorded.)

 

If anyone could guide me based on their experience so I?m not wasting my time in setting up recordings, it would be greatly appreciated.

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Do you also have an old VHS recorder? If so, you might try recording a film with both your DVD and VHS recorder and see if the VHS recorder can record it.

 

One problem with DVD is that the technology has many flaws in it, and quite often some brands of disks won't record properly on some brands of DVD recorders.

 

My Panasonic recorder is supposed to record DVD+R disks, but it did so only for about a year, then it stopped recording on them. I sent it back to Panasonic for repair but they didn't know how to correct the problem, so I had to switch over to -R disks.

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I do have a videocassette recorder...and there is no problem recording any movie that TCM airs onto videotape.

 

The problem occurs when trying to record movies onto DVD. Some of the movies aired are copyguard-protected, which means that most newer model DVD recorders will not be able to record them. I'm trying to figure out which movies are copyguard-protected and which aren't...and what effect the copyguard-protected ones have on making recordings of the movies that immediately follow them on the TCM schedule.

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I had never heard anything about TCM copy protecting what they show. They already put the logo on the films they show, which would (in effect) copy protect what they show. I have a dvd recorder too, but the only troubles I have encountered are with defective discs. So I got a DVR recorder so that if the black disc I put in turns out to be defective, I can start the movie over again and not miss out on recording what I want. Otherwise, I have had no trouble recording anything off of TCM.

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Hey, Vallo,

 

I checked the thread you mentioned...but I couldn't quite find an indication of how you might know in advance which movies airing on TCM are copyguard-protected. I've never had any problem recording any film from the '20s, '30s, '40s, or '50s on DVD. It seems like the protection is put only on the more recent films. And sometimes that protection, unfortunately, spills over to the next film airing on TCM.

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Over the years I've recorded something like 2500 films from TCM either on VHS or DVD, both older and recent films and I've never found one that wouldn't record because it was copy protected. Actually, I've never had a problem recording from any channel including HBO and other pay channels which I subscribe to. What brand of recorder do you have?

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Until over the last few years there was no such thing as DRM and flagging shows so they couldn't be recorded. Also there was no digital, everything was analog, Once the VCR war fought and fair use was defined back when vcrs came out everything settled down until recently with the digital frontier, and perfect copy and the ability to make many perfect copies and distributable them freely.. As far recording now, all you have off the back of any satilite recivier or cable box is RCA ; Red, White, Yellow, and maybe a s-video connection, there is no digital out like a hdmi, which is what is used for High Definition input from HD sources, That is something I doubt that we will ever get,, a digitial output to connect and move material to any device we want, including dvd recorders. check out my blog for my other thought on the Digital Revolution :

also check my profile for my email address if you have any other questions..

http://kenenthlawson.blogspot.com/'>http://kenenthlawson.blogspot.com/'>http://kenenthlawson.blogspot.com/'>http://kenenthlawson.blogspot.com/

 

http://kenenthlawson.blogspot.com/

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Soundtrackers,

 

I have never had difficulty recording any movies shown on TCM with Panasonic DVD recorders and combo recorders manufactured in 2005 and 2006. All these have analog tuners. Two of my Panasonics are enslaved to a Comcast digital cable box for the specific purpose of recording TCM.

 

I also have one Panasonic DVD recorder with analog/digital tuning. This Panasonic, manufactured in 2007, is set up cable-ready (without a cable box) so it is not used to record TCM.

 

I have some brief experience with a DVD combo recorder manufactured by Funai. These are marketed under several brand names, Magnavox, Sylvania, and others. I found that this combo recorder deemed a variety of programing from the digital cable box as "copyright protected" so it frequently refused to record. This combo recorder also found home-recorded videotapes (that I recorded from AMC in the early 1990's) as "copyright protected" and refused to copy the recording. I had no problem copying the very same recording with a Panasonic combo recorder. I contacted Funai Customer Support. They said that some of their products were overly sensitive and suggested that I return the product to Wal-Mart for exchange or refund. I took the refund.

 

I have read many user comments or reviews that Sony DVD recorders are also very sensitive to copyright protection.

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Be sure you use quality DVDs. I use Taiyo Yuden 16x DVDR disks and have never had one fail (2500 and counting). These are made only in Japan. You can buy them in bulk online and you pay lot less than you would for the junk at Best Buy.

 

--

Terry Wallace

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I have haven't had any problems with my slyanvia DVD recorder, I have recorded off many channels and had excellent results, the only problem I ever had was not with the recorder, or the disc playing on surround sound system, one brand of disc which played fine everywhere else didn't like my wifes system in her art studio,

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Two weeks ago I had tried a new Sony DVD recorder...but there were problems with the picture freezing in the middle of a movie. I spoke with the people at Sony, and they admitted that the mechanism was overly sensitive...and they finally suggested that I return it to the store I purchased it from (I had tried two different Sony recorders...always the same problem with the frozen picture...and with the picture being out of synch with the dialogue). On the other hand, it did record every movie on TCM I wanted it to.

 

A few days ago I purchased a Samsung DVD recorder...and this is the one that's really hit and miss. About half of the movies I've tried to record off of TCM are deemed "copyguard-protected," and the equipment simply will not record them. Who could possibly be copyguarding "The Sin of Madelon Claudet"? (Big black market for that one, I'm sure.)

 

Should I return the Samsung and try another brand? Or are all current DVD recorders on the market hypersensitive to copyguard protection? I'm getting kind of desperate...so I would greatly appreciate suggestions from you guys who have a cable box and record onto DVDs. (I have been recording on dual layer discs to get the best quality picture.)

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I have not had nay problem recording of TCM or any channel as I've said before, I also have a cheap $100.00 special unit from Target or K-mart, or the like. Its hooked up through the RCA cables off the back of my sat recivier, As for spending the money on dual layer disc, I wouldn't worry about that, just use regular dvd-r disc, Remember by the time you hook up the RCA cable your doing a digital to analog conversion, as as the signal sent to your box was digital and is converted to analog to go out the rca and s-videos.. .. I would go ahead and try getting a different unit, I have a Sylvania DVR91DG and have been pretty happy with it..

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I spent quite a bit of time reviewing VHS/DVD combo recorders. Decided not to touch a SONY because I read they were overly sensitive to copyrighted material and settled for a Panasonic Model DMR-EZ47V.

 

Took a bit of time to decipher a really stupidly written manual, but have never had a situation where a TCM movie failed to record. I use only DVD-R discs.

 

I bought a combo to copy older VHS tapes, and honestly believe that some of the recordings I have copied from VHS tapes to DVD-R discs are better than the original tapes.

 

--Gus Cerini

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I'm glad to hear you finely have good luck.. I hate to say it but we're probably going to run into more problems like you ran into with the Sony as time goes on and copy write protection is getting more aggressive, Its not the broadcaster fault, if they want to broadcast the material they have to do what the copy write holders tell them to do or they don't show it. It all comes down to DRM... I have a Sylvania DVR91DG

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The only problem I have with DVDs is that I'm used to recording tapes on EP speed and getting six hours worth of programmed movies from TCM with excellent fidelity. I am reluctant to record a DVD at that speed. Have you ever recorded onto DVDs at that slow a speed?

 

--Gus Cerini

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For most stuff I use Sp which is about 2 hours and its pretty good, I have gone down to the slowest speed, which is about 10 hours and recored a bunch of esispodes of a aminaie for my daughter, I think I got like 14 half hour shows for her on one disc. I have done other sppeds in between and they all seem to play ok as far as I can tell,

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My favorite TCM programming is early talkies through the film noir era. I generally do not care for movies produced after 1960, but there are some exceptions.

 

With my Panasonics I record most black and white material at the EP speed (six hours per DVD). (Panasonics may also be set to record eight hours per DVD. Visit the SETUP menu to change the default EP speed to eight hours.) At the EP speed black and white picture quality is satisfactory and color picture quality is watchable but only of fair quality. For much better picture quality I use the LP speed (four hour per DVD) for black and white material of special merit and for very good color reproduction. Occasionally I may use the SP speed (two hours per DVD) or the Flexible Recording feature that fits or fills a DVD with a recording of specific length for best picture quality.

 

Panasonics set to record at LP (four hours per DVD) or better give 500 lines of resolution. Other brands need to be set at SP (two hours per DVD) to give this resolution. This was an important factor in my purchase of Panasonic DVD recorders and combo recorders.

 

In September 2007 I concluded a ten month project dubbing to DVD selected portions of my home-recorded time-shifted videotape archive going back to 1986. During this project there were usually four Panasonic DMR-ES30V and DMR-ES35V combo recorders running up to sixteen hours per day. Occasionally there were six or seven Panasonic combo recorders or DVD recorders and two Toshiba VCRs running up to eighteen hours per day. I also continued to time-shift from TCM and other cable services before, during and since the dubbing project.

 

Currently I have twelve functional Panasonic DVD recorders or combo recorders, five in current daily use and seven reserved for standby use. Of my six most frequently used Panasonics the average utilization is 3,008 recording hours per machine (as of 5 February 2008). (I keep track of this information in order to maintain DVD drive hub, spindle and lens servicing and to monitor power supply electrolytic capacitor longevity in these machines. I do not keep track of play hour utilization as this is a far less demanding function as long as burned disc hub and spindle areas are kept clean.) One Panasonic, my first DMR-ES30V (a 2005 model) had a DVD drive failure after eleven months' use. That drive was replaced by Panasonic under warranty. That machine has more than 4,200 hours recording. Last month that machine was set aside for servicing and standby use. At some point I may rotate that machine back into regular service as it is a reliable performer.

 

I use TDK, Maxell or Verbatim DVD-R media for archival use. Due to an excessive failure rate, one in every six blank discs, I do not use Memorex brand DVD-R discs.

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My purpose in buying a DVD recorder is to record movies off of TCM. That's it. Just TCM. Therefore, it's important to me (1) that the recorder is capable of recording off of TCM without getting the copyguard-protection notice, which prevents you from making a recording of a specific movie and (2) that the recording itself isn't flawed.

 

And ideally I'd like to get a DVD recorder/VCR combo so I can watch my old videotapes and, if necessary, convert some of them to DVD.

 

As I mentioned earlier, at first I tried the Sony DVD recorder/VCR combo. It recorded all the movies off of Turner without a hitch. However, during playback ALMOST ALL of the recordings froze at different points (sometimes for a second...sometimes forever), and there was a lip-synch issue as well (where the words spoken didn't quite match up with the picture presented). I dealt with Sony technicians at the highest level, and they admitted that the unit was flawed in that it is hypersensitive to signals it wrongly interpreted as copyguard-protected. Their suggestion: Return it to the place of purchase and try another manufacturer's product.

 

Next I tried a fairly expensive JVC model...and it failed on all fronts. I returned it within two hours.

 

Then I purchased the Samsung model (DVD-VR357). There were no problems with flawed recordings. However, it would not record a majority of the movies being shown on Turner. The very same movie airing on TCM On Demand that I was able to record with the Sony equipment, for example, was deemed "copyguard-protected" by the Samsung recorder.

 

Unless I'm way off-track, I've deduced that some manufacturers have incorporated stronger copyguard protection into their equipment than others. It has nothing to do with what TCM itself is broadcasting; it has everything to do with what the particular recorder is capable of doing (or overriding).

 

I'm open to suggestions...but I want to buy a current model and pick it up at a store (where I can return it within 30 days if it proves to be unreliable or incapable of recording off of TCM). I've checked the online reviews for the Panasonic recorder, and the negative comments posted by so many different users has made me a bit wary of it. Has anyone purchased a new DVD recorder/video combo (or even just a DVD recorder by itself) within the past few months that they can unreservedly recommend? I find that this has been one of the more frustrating experiences in my life as a consumer. Is it impossible to find reliability and TCM-friendliness in the same recorder?

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Once the Feds force Digital onto us, DRM issues will prevent a lot of us from recording films and watching them on OUR schedules instead of the broadcasters'.

 

Why should they provide us with real consumer choices? They can market it as such but now that Digital and Digital Rights Management are falling on us (like pianos from skyscrapers), we'll REALLY enjoy not having true choices by law. Thanks, Congress. Gee - why can't we have true cable by demand? Why can't we have true competition for cable TV services in every home in every neighborhood? Why can't we buy only the channels we want to watch?

 

Oh yeah - that would be TRUE consumer choice. That would be a TRUE market economy. We certainly don't want the people to have THAT ability.

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Soundtrackers,

 

I have experience with many Panasonics, including two examples of those manufactured in 2007. I can not recommend the current (2007) models due to bugs (some that have recently started appearing), design flaws, and, with combo recorders, the lack of essential dubbing features that are found in 2006 and some 2005 models.

 

Pansonic combo recorders, DMR-ES35V (from 2006) and DMR-ES30V (from 2005) are full-featured and have performed well in my service. There are two other similar models, DMR-ES45V and DMR-ES46V (from 2006). All these have analog tuners that will continue to be useful when enslaved to a digital cable box. I would not hesitate to purchase any of these models if they may be found new or refurbished by Panasonic. Your present VCR may also be connected to any of these or to a DVD recorder that does not have a VHS section. One DVD recorder that has served well is the DMR-ES15 (from 2006). These sometimes may also be found new or refurbished by Panasonic. One model to avoid is the DMR-ES40V (from 2005).

 

I have just checked Amazon finding new and refurbished DMR-ES35V combo recorders reasonably priced. New models come with the original one year warranty. Models refurbished by Panasonic come with a 90 day warranty. Again, I must repeat that my Panasonics purchased refurbished have performed well in very heavy use. Occasionally new or refurbished Panasonics appear on eBay or other online services.

 

My Panasonics have been purchased new, refurbished and used. I have even purchased as-is parts machines and cannibalized them to keep those purchased used in service.

 

In the Information Please! thread I gave the same advice with more detail:

 

Panasonic's 2007 model combo recorders DMR-EZ37, DMR-EZ47, DMR-EZ475 are limited to a front panel control for dubbing. At first this seems quite user-friendly. The drawback is that this dubbing method is not really as user-friendly for SELECTIVE dubbing as it does not incorporate two essential features, Time Limited Dubbing/Copying and Flexible Dubbing/Copying as found on 2006 and some 2005 models. I have some experience with front panel copying/dubbing controls as it is one of two dubbing methods available on my earlier models. Front panel dubbing is satisfactory for occasional dubbing or copying an entire videotape without supervison, but the controls do not allow customized settings. Selective dubbing with front panel controls requires frequent supervision. And dubbing initiated from front panel controls stops and starts, dividing recordings into new titles whenever encountering videotape index marks or whenever it is deemed that one recording has ended and another begins. Sometimes a scene change or a commercial will cause a new title to be started.

 

My recent dubbing project included home-recorded videotapes that I had recorded over a twenty-year period. I was selective in what I chose to preserve to DVD. During the ten month dubbing project, concluded in early September, I usually had four Panasonic combo recorders running sixteen hours per day. Sometimes as many as seven Panasonic combo recorders were running up to eighteen hours per day. These Panasonics, DMR-ES35V models (from 2006) and the similar DMR-ES30V models (from 2005) also feature menu-initiated dubbing that allows Time Limited Dubbing/Copying and Flexible Dubbing/Copying, the two essential features for such an extensive selective dubbing project. These features, accessed from the FUNCTIONS menu on the remote control, streamline selective dubbing through customized settings so the Panasonics may be left alone to do their work with very little supervision. This method of dubbing produces seemless recordings.

 

Without Time Limited Dubbing/Copying and Flexible Dubbing/Copying my dubbing project would have occupied a much longer, labor-intensive committment.

 

For selective dubbing there is very little advantage to a current Panasonic combo recorder. A less expensive Panasonic DVD recorder interconnected with an external VCR will perform the same function and allows for workarounds that emulate the essential dubbing features missing from current model Panasonic combo recorders.

 

If facing an extensive selective dubbing project I would give consideration to these Panasonic combo recorders: DMR-ES35V, DMR-ES45V, or DMR-ES46V (all 2006 models). I have four DMR-ES35V models (and two of the similar DMR-ES30V models from 2005). I purchased some of these new, some refurbished and some used. These Panasonic models may sometimes be found on eBay or other online sources factory refurbished to new condition by Panasonic, with a 90-day Panasonic warranty, and at very reasonable prices. The refurbished models I have purchased have performed well and been very reliable. Used models do not have warranties.

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