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Foreign Films and their American Remakes


Metropolisforever
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Foreign films are frequently remade by Hollywood.

 

FOR EXAMPLE:

 

Some Like it Hot is actually a remake of Fanfaren der Liebe.

 

The Magnificent Seven is actually a remake/rip-off of The Seven Samurai.

 

If TCM was really awesome, they would air the foreign film AND the American film, so people could sit down and pick the two apart.

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TCM?s policy prohibits use of profanity on the message boards and I will not violate that policy by mentioning the actor by name.

 

However, one actor known for his arrogance attempted a remake of a Spanish film titled ABRE LOS OJOS or OPEN YOUR EYES. The original featured Penelope Cruz, as did the remake, but I did not need to see the remake to know the original was a far superior film.

 

A few years ago, a little film about dance featuring Susan Sarandon and Richard Gere was a remake of a Japanese film with a title that translated roughly to SHALL WE DANCE. I felt no desire to see the American remake because elements of Japanese culture are essential to the storyline.

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I did an entire night of this in one of the Programming Challenges. :-)

 

Just a few more examples:

 

Ossessione, remade as The Postman Always Rings Twice

Intermezzo, remade as Intermezzo: A Love Story (both starred Ingrid Bergman)

Plein Soleil, remade as The Talented Mr. Ripley

The Battle for the Heavy Water, remade as The Heroes of Telemark

The Return of Martin Guerre (I hope nobody else remembers Sommersby!)

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The plots of both:

 

?Safe in Hell? (1931)

 

and

 

?Le Salaire de la peur? (?The Wages of Fear?) 1953

 

Were combined for the plot of ?Sorcerer? (1977).

 

All three movies were great.

 

The ?crossing the bridge in a big truck filled with nitro? scene in ?Sorcerer? was probably the best scene of that kind ever filmed. It was pretty much modeled after the ?turning a big truck of nitro around on a narrow mountain road? scene in ?The Wages of Fear?.

 

Where the various criminals escaped to at the beginning of "Sorcerer", and where they were at the end, was taken directly from ?Safe in Hell?.

 

I also suggest that some of the scenes of the truck on narrow mountain roads might have been inspired by Lucy and Desi?s ?Long Long Trailer? (1954), or perhaps one could argue that the scenes from that film were modeled after scenes from ?The Wages of Fear?.

 

I think this would not be a bad film for TCM to air, if the network insists on airing more recent films. It is actually a pretty good film, and its style and plot-lines follow in the footsteps of a lot of old Hollywood classics.

 

Watch this clip and see what you think about it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_KHZ4zoerw

 

A couple of interesting points about this particular scene... it certainly seems to be real and not faked or computer generated, and there isn?t any cursing in it, while I think many viewers of this scene might be mumbling a few ?dang!? words as they watch it.

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The bold features in the menu don't work.

 

To get bold, type a left bracket

 

[

 

then the letter:

 

b

 

then a right bracket:

 

]

 

Then type your text that is to be bold. To end the boldness, type a left bracket:

 

[

 

then this:

 

/b

 

then a right bracket:

 

]

 

For italics, use the letter "i" instead of "b".

 

That will give you either BOLD or ITALIC text.

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Hi Fred...i read the synopsis of safe in hell 1931...where do you see any resemblance to wages of fear??as for the americanized version//i must admit that the bridge scene is remarkable..to say the least...never saw the film in entirety ''does it have an unhappy ending like the original...thanks bill

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La Cage Au Folles was remade in the Us, and despite Robin Williams was in it, it wasn't bad. I'd like to see them back to back to decide which one is the better film. (I'm pretty sure it will be the French one)

 

The Birdcage was better than most remakes in large part I'm sure because it was a Mike Nichols film. Also, there was good chemistry between the leading actors. I'd hate to see what it could have been like with a less talented director.

 

Also, surprised no one has mentioned The Departed yet.

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> Hi Fred...i read the synopsis of safe in hell 1931...where do you see any resemblance to wages of fear??

 

Metz, read my post again. I didn?t say ?Safe in Hell? resembled ?Wages of Fear?. I said the basic plots of ?Safe in Hell? and ?Wages of Fear? were combined to make ??Sorcerer?.

 

In ?Safe in Hell? the girl was wanted for killing someone, and a friend helped her hide out by smuggling her into some Latin American country. She winds up in a terrible hotel in Central America that is filled with different kinds of obnoxious criminals who are wanted for various crimes in other countries.

 

In ?Wages of Fear? several guys take a couple of truck loads of nitroglycerine on a winding mountain road so the nitro can be used to put out an oil well fire. The road trip is harrowing and dangerous.

 

In ?Sorcerer? several different kinds of obnoxious criminals from different countries are smuggled into some Central American country where they all wind up in a terrible hotel together. Four of the criminals try to make money to get out of that place by taking truck loads of nitroglycerine over a winding mountain road so the nitro can be used to put out an oil well fire. The road trip is harrowing and dangerous.

 

?Sorcerer? is not only a remake of ?Wages of Fear?, it is also a remake of ?Safe in Hell?.

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A few more titles to add to the mix:

 

LES COMPERES with Pierre Richard & G?rard Dpardieu is the original French film that became FATHER?S DAY with Robin Williams & Billy Crystal.

 

THE TALL BLONDE MAN WITH ONE BLACK SHOE with Pierre Richard is also the original French film that became THE MAN WITH ONE RED SHOE with Tom Hanks.

 

EAT DRINK MAN WOMAN is a captivating Chinese film directed by Ang Lee that became TORTILLA SOUP with Hector Elizondo and Elizabeth Pena.

 

BELLA MARTHA, strangely translated as MOSTLY MARTHA, is a fascinating German film that became NO RESERVATIONS with Catherine Zeta-Jones and Aaron Eckhart.

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