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Did anyone like Apocalypse Now?


FredCDobbs
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The first time I saw this film it was pan-n-scan and edited for content....never watch a movie such as this in that way. Now after seeing it in theatrical version as well as the extended version, both in letterbox, I liked it much better. Perhapses Martin Sheen's finest performance...?

A good friend of mine was in the Vietnam war, he does not talk about it much, only to say if I need to know what it was like to be there, then watch this movie. BTW...he also is a HUGH movie fan. Maybe I can get him here to this site.

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>Maybe I can get him here to this site.

 

Sounds like a good idea to me. I'd like to read his comments about the movie, if he doesn't mind talking about it. By the way, anything I later say about the politics of the war, I'm not complaining about the soldiers, I'm complaining about the generals and the two Presidents who carried on the war.

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An actual water buffalo was slaughtered with a machete for the climactic scene. It was in fact a real ritual performed by local natives, with Coppola and a film crew on the sidelines as honored guests. Although this was an American production subject to American animal cruelty laws, scenes like this filmed in the Philippines were not policed or monitored, and the American Humane Association gave the film an "unacceptable" rating.

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Thanks for the info. I suspected the slaughter was real. I don?t particularly like that kind of scene in a movie, but in this case I realized why Coppola included it, and I gave him a break. I think the horse head scene in ?The Godfather? was much more gross.

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>I always love the opening sequence.

 

Oh, yes, the opening sequence is brilliant, from the opening first shot, to the other opening in the hotel room.

 

Here are some more of my opinions about this film:

 

I remember reading a lot of media reports about the production while it was being filmed in the Philippines. Some said it would be a bizarre film. Others said it would be a disaster. Others questioned Coppola?s sanity, because of the weird rumors about some of the scenes being filmed and because it was going way over budget. Saturday Night Live did a great skit about the making of the film. I think it was John Belushi who (in the skit) was given a secret assignment by the financial backers of the film to travel up some remote river in the Philippines and terminate (with extreme prejudice) Coppola himself because he had ?gone mad? and was doing crazy things and going way over budget. Lol. This was a great skit. So I figured I had to go see the film when it was released to theaters.

 

From the very opening title scenes, I loved it. Coppola was a master at editing film to music and adding special sound effects to the music to make them seem like they were part of the music.

 

The film was something of a fantasy, which anti-war people hated. Most liberal activists at that time (1979) wanted to see a typical anti-Nixon, anti-government, anti-war film like the ones Oliver Stone would eventually make. But Coppola decided to make an artistic film, which, in its own unique way, was both an anti-war film and an artistic classic film too.

 

The long hazardous trip up the river, which had some strange goal of killing an American soldier who had gone crazy, was symbolic of what had happened during the long and confusing war itself. The idea of ?getting in so deep, we can?t get out, and we don?t know what we?re doing here in the first place? was a major theme in the film, which was also symbolic of that particular war. Similar to what is going on in Iraq today.

 

The fact that the war was big and expensive and cost a lot of lives, but it was not a real ?necessity? (while WW II had been a real necessity), and the fact that the war actually hurt the international image of the United States (while WW II had helped the image of the US), was symbolized by the stupidity of the surfing scenes, the Playboy bunnies on stage in the jungle, and all the soldiers trying to escape from that last outpost on the river where the bridge was located. And also the mind-damaging drug use by the confused soldiers was a good point too.

 

The tiger in the jungle scene was a surprise and it symbolized all the various surprises the US encountered while trying to fight a guerrilla war in the jungle, and today this is similar to how the military was taken off guard and surprised by the IEDs which the military was not prepared to handle. The ?never get out of the boat? message basically meant ?never get bogged down in a guerrilla war that we don?t know how to fight.? The frantic solder?s scream, ?All I wanted to do is be a f****** cook, man!? was a brilliant line, which is the way most of the Vietnam soldiers felt. There was almost no feeling of ?I want to save my country? among the soldiers toward the end of the war. As kids they never expected to grow up and be drafted and sent into some stupid jungle 10,000 miles from home.

 

The way Robert Duvall said the line, ?Someday this war will be over,? was tremendously significant, because he meant that he really liked the war and would be sorry when it was over, whereas people who said that same line in WW II movies meant that they would be glad when that war was over.

 

The narration by Martin Sheen was very good too. Having him speak his lines softly, while his lips were close to a microphone, was a very clever idea, because it sounded like he was right next to us, almost whispering in our ear while revealing his innermost secrets, rather than giving a large group of people a lecture in a large auditorium. Not too many people realize that the recording technique was very cleverly thought out by Coppola. On the other hand, Coppola used the ?lecture? technique at the start of Patton, when George C. Scott was speaking before the large American flag.

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Mark, I agree that Paths of Glory was great. They should have put those generals before that firing squad.

 

Did you cry during the fraulein singing scene? I did.

 

For those who haven't seen it, the cafe scene starts 2:17 into this clip. The girl is German, the soldiers are French. Watch what happens.

 

 

 

This is one of the most beautiful movie scenes ever filmed.

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By the way, the version of the film that I saw in the theater in 1979 ended with a napalm air strike on Col. Kurtz's compound. This air strike was later cut from most versions of the film, and the TCM version is not the original theatrical version, nor was it the 1978 "director's cut" 70 mm version, since that version had no end credits.

 

This is the original theatrical ending that I saw in 1979 (except that the end credits have been removed from this version):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fORb1Ennbg

 

See:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apocalypse_Now#Endings

 

"The original 1978 70 mm theatrical release ended with Willard's boat, the stone statue, then fade to black with no credits. Later, when it was no longer practical to not have any credits, Coppola elected to show the credits superimposed over shots of Kurtz's base exploding (anamorphic 16 mm rental prints circulated with this ending, and can be found in the hands of a few collectors);

 

Because of the confusion over the misinterpreted ending, there are multiple slightly varying versions of the ending credits. Some TV screenings maintain the explosion footage at the end, others do not, and there are several other versions.

 

The 70 mm release ends with no credits, save for 'Copyright 1979 Omni Zoetrope' right after the film ends; This mirrors the lack of any opening titles, and supposedly stems from Coppola's original intention to "tour" the film as one would a play:"

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I won't go into my reasoning but I can not bring myself to see it. However, this was an odd experience in my life. I love to go on cruises. I love the Caribbean. I have five nights in my life that are my favorite moments (I reflect a lot) and one of those memories is while in the Dominican Republic. That evening in this resort area of the island over 5000 people from the ships attending a beautfiul show in an outdoor arena built to resemble those of ancient Greece.

It was built admist all these resaurants and had cobblestone sideways. Just incredibly gorgeous. And you could walk to the back of the amtiptheatre and look down hundred of feet and there was a river with plenty of the makings of a jungle. And the show began with an intro saying," Welcome to Los Amonos (sic, my spelling is horrible), the site for the filming of Apocalypse Now."

Now I can't watch it for a different reason. It was one of the most beautiful places I have ever seen and if I don't grow up my memory will be tainted.

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Thanks FredCDobbs,

 

I almost missed your reply, this board takes major exception to my 'open source' browser and 'flash' player. I can't seem to correct one bit of code, from my first message, that renders fine in all my other messages. I guess I should just be grateful I can participate at all sans Micro$oft ware and with javascript disabled.

 

I couldn't have imagined there was a version that includes or ends with an airstrike on Kurtz's compound. So I really appreciate your update and links. That actually ammounts to fairly influential trivia. Not to mention, my surprise it was presented in theaters uncut.

 

thanks again for contributing to my cinematic experience ...

 

The corporations are opposed by the LoTeks, a resistance movement risen from the streets: hackers, data-pirates, guerilla-fighters in the info-wars - William Gibson's 'Johnny Mnemonic' (85-95)

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hi kennethlawson,

 

I am using a 'Firefox 2.0' specific to a 'Linux OS' distribution, at the moment. But I've been a 'Mozilla' proponent for a while, and am known to visit these boards, with anything from 'Firefox (less than) 1.0', it's namesake 'Firebird (less than) .07' or it's predecessor 'Phoenix (less than) .05'.

 

Did the recent demise of 'Mozilla's kernel 'Netscape' make you sentimental like some classic cinema?

 

The corporations are opposed by the LoTeks, a resistance movement risen from the streets: hackers, data-pirates, guerilla-fighters in the info-wars - William Gibson's 'Johnny Mnemonic' (85-95)

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Yes, there?s even a line in the TCM version of the movie where Willard tells Chef, ?Here, take the radio. If I don?t get back by 2200 hours, you?ll call in the air strike.?

 

Willard gives him the code name ?Almighty? and the map coordinates of their location. At the end of the TCM version we hear the words ?Almighty... Almighty? coming from the speaker of the military radio. Shortly after that, in the theatrical version, the flares fall and the air strike begins.

 

I think it was a much better ending with the air strike.

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In theory, it shouldn't make any difference whats under the browser, xp os X, Linux but its possible the message boards here aren't Linux friendly. I've played with Linux on and off over the years, started to get into Untumbu late last year but never completely made the switch due to needing Outlook for the pda,

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hi FredCDobbs and Metropolisforever,

 

I caught those details regarding some potential airstrike. But I appreciate you tableing them for reference to this discussion. That's why I am agreeing that it's a fairly significant deviation even if it dovetails with pre-existing plotlines

 

thanks again ..

 

Edited to Add: thanks for the additional references Metropolisforever, I've admired your pseudonym for some time since 'Metropolis' is still my favorite sci-fi ...

 

The corporations are opposed by the LoTeks, a resistance movement risen from the streets: hackers, data-pirates, guerilla-fighters in the info-wars - William Gibson's 'Johnny Mnemonic' (85-95)

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