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A Great Movie Alert!


path40a
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Very good, Path ... how apropos!!

 

I didn't see A Month by the Lake (1995) starring Vanessa Redgrave, Edward Fox, and Uma Thurman on your tennis movie list. It contains an amusing match sequence where Vanessa runs poor Edward all over the court.

 

A wonderful movie too. Vanessa tries to get something going with Edward (I'll let it remain to be seen whether or not whupping him on the court helped her cause) but all Edward can think of his young Uma (playing one of her sweet-young-thing roles (a la Dangerous Liaisons), still far away from wanting to kill Bill. An elegant and tasteful romantic comedy. I don't think the critics were too kind with this film (I may be wrong), but I loved it.

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Hi,

 

I loved the movie "A Month by the Lake"; it is a character based movie and well acted. Even if the critics did like it, it is not the type of film that attracts large audiences. Silly teenagers and yokels and dopes are not going to watch an intelligent picture with depth. They will go to "The Longest Yard" (which I wouldn't pay 2 cents to see)....

Another film like "A Month by the Lake" is the current "Ladies in Lavender". It is for all of us, the intelligent, who prize quality to attend. I recommend you see it.

 

Larry

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#jun17

 

and they include a night of Nicholas Ray's films followed by the German language version of "Anna Christie"; an excellent selection of Father's Day films (which I'll make note of soon in a separate thread) followed by "Rag Man" (the silent scored by TCM's Young Composer winner Linda Martinez, who tragically took her own life in May); a couple of films I know feaito would recommend: "The Barretts of Wimpole Street (1934)" & "Madame DuBarry (1934)" as well as one of ML's favorites "Captains Courageous (1937)"; another installment of Future Shock; a Cary Grant/Carole Lombard/Kay Francis treat called "In Name Only (1937)" and a very good "noirish" film I just watched (and reviewed) called "Odds Against Tomorrow (1959)", which features a typically terrific performance by Robert Ryan.

 

Also, FYI, AFI will be airing their 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes special next Tuesday, June 21 at 8 PM ET

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"Odds Against Tomorrow (1959)", which features a typically terrific performance by Robert Ryan.

 

Thanks so much, path! Now there's one I would have missed, since my silly arbitrary 'cutoff' year is 1950.

 

And since my new hunk(s) is Robert Ryan (and Sterling Hayden) I will enjoy this one.

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Tomorrow (or later today) Friday, the 17th, at I believe 9:45 pm In a Lonely Place with Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame is on. It's a great film noir with fabulous performances from both Bogart and Grahame. To me, they are two of the greatest noir actors.

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Interesting programming coming up on June 27:

 

The Patsy (1928) Starring Marion Davies

 

Captured on Film: The True Story of Marion Davies (2001)

 

Florodora Girl (1930) Starring Marion Davies

 

Citizen Kane (1941)

 

... and maybe a little provocative.

 

After seeing two fine Marion Davies films along with a documentary, we get to see the faux Marion a la Orson Welles. It's the latter that comes off badly with this little sequence of films.

 

 

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#jun24

 

which include some excellent "Witness Stand Breakdown" films this Friday; a fantasy classic I just watched for the first time On Borrowed Time (1939) and your last time to catch the NEW documentary on Steve McQueen; the Marion Davies/Marie Dressler silent The Patsy (1928); Manhattan Melodrama (1934) and the last installment of TCM's Star of the Month - Ingrid Bergman films; a not too frequently shown gem Sweet Bird of Youth (1962) followed by Elizabeth Taylor at her sexiest in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958); a Nelson Eddy & Jeanette MacDonald documentary followed by some of their films like Rose Marie (1936); and (finally!) Min and Bill (1930), a Marie Dressler-Wallace Beery film ML recommended that many of us have been waiting to see!

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path, what did you think of On Borrowed Time? I remember being over the moon on it when I first saw it. Don't know what has happened to me, but I couldn't even watch it all the way through now.

 

Thanks on Min and Bill and all your other recommendations I would otherwise miss.

 

Don't forget me and my love Warren and The Mouthpiece, okay? :)

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm

 

including the film which was made into a play on Broadway that won six 2005 Tony Awards - Light in the Piazza (1962) starring Olivia de Havilland, Rosanno Brazzi, Yvette Mimieux, & George Hamilton AND the Oscar winning Best Foreign Language Film Closely Watched Trains (1967); a great lineup this Saturday which includes, among others, three classics not shown very often She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949), White Heat (1949), & The Sea Wolf (1941); a Wonderful Wizard of Oz salute including the 1910 silent version; Cagney's Oscar winning performance in Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942) on July 4th along with the "early" Hitchcock gem Saboteur (1942); a brand new TCM Sci-Fi film documentary called Watch the Skies (2005); the first installment of Audrey Hepburn (TCM's July Star of the Month) films including the rarely shown Roman Holiday (1953), Sabrina (1954) & The Nun's Story (1959); and the first of many nights devoted to "Cars in the Movies" with the TCM Premiere of the Oscar winning Best Picture The French Connection (1971)!

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Path, it looks like more good stuff coming to TCM.

 

Of course I'll be watching the fine performances of James Cagney in "White Heat" and Edward G. Robinson in "The Sea Wolf", along with Ida Lupino and John Garfield.

I'm looking forward to "The French Connection", an action packed movie with one of the best car chases ever filmed. It's been a while since I've seen it. Can't wait.

As usual, good reporting, Path.

 

Mongo

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I would like to remind everyone that late tonight at 3:15 am, TCM will be playing "Min and Bill" with Marie Dressler and Wallace Beery, followed by "Tugboat Annie," also starring the pair.

 

I've seen "Min and Bill," and it's a GREAT movie, with a knock-out performance by Dressler. She just tears your heart out with her incredible acting in this. I urge anyone who hasn't seen it to watch or tape it - it's well worth watching.

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#jul8

 

including three TCM premieres, several new capsule (or full) reviews, more "Cars in the Movies" selections, films directed by Edward Dmytryk, and the second installment of Audrey Hepburn (TCM's July S.O.T.M.) films.

 

Out of the many great films listed in these picks, those being shown in the coming week which aren't aired very often that I think you should try to watch (if you haven't seen them) include: Dead End (1937), Quality Street (1937), He Who Gets Slapped (1924), The Hard Way (1942), & Old Acquaintance (1943).

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Don't know how many of y'all saw TCM's new Richard Schickel documentary "Watch the Skies" last night, but I just watched it today. It's narrated by Mark Hamill. If you missed it, it'll be shown again on the 17th and the 25th of this month.

 

I thought it was fairly well done, giving a lot of screen-time to those directors who were affected by them enough to give us the sci-fi hits of today: Ridley Scott, James Cameron, George Lucas, and Steven Spielberg (who because of the release of his most recent film, was featured most prominently).

 

Anybody else who watched it have any comments?

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I for one saw the documentary "Watch the Skies" and I enjoyed it. Loved the clips of all the old Sci-Fi movies, especially "Invaders from Mars" (which I would like to see again) and "The Incredible Shrinking Man".

 

And I must say that the enthusiasm of Steven Spielberg was refreshing. He certainly was a true-blue movie fan who relished and scrutinized, what was before him on the silver screen.

 

Mongo

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I also watched the documentary, and thought it was well done. Just as good as all of the other documentaries that TCM produces. And Mongo you're right, Speilberg was FULL of enthusiasm. That was great to see. In fact, it would be great to see him as a guest programmer, and see him sit down and talk with Robert Osborne.

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Thanks for your input Mongo & moviejoe, I hope more will get a chance to see "Watch the Skies" when it's on again later this month.

 

BTW, moviejoe, I finally got a chance to watch (and review) "Min and Bill (1930)" this weekend, and I agree with your (and Mary Lou's) assessment of this classic. Great stuff. Don't you think King Vidor must have been thinking of its ending when he was working on his equally memorable finish to "Stella Dallas (1937)"?

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#jul15

 

including a non-advertised selection of films directed by William Dieterle (with the Oscar winning Best Picture The Life of Emile Zola (1937) & my favorite of his Dr. Ehrlich's Magic Bullet (1940)) and one of feaito's favorites Portrait of Jennie (1948); a reshowing of several Laurel & Hardy films from April Fools month (with the audio track fixed, we hope); three "Horror Comedy" TCM premieres - Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948), The Ghost Breakers (1940), & The Old Dark House (1932); the third installment of Audrey Hepburn (TCM's July SOTM) films including Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961); one of stoney's favorites Beyond Tomorrow (1940) I haven't seen; some great "Cars in the Movies" films including Ida Lupino's The Hitch-Hiker (1953) starring Edmond O'Brien; the premiere of TCM Essentials host Peter Bogdanovich's Mask (1985) and a terrific early Edward G. Robinson Academy Award Best Picture nominated newspaper drama titled Five Star Final (1931); and the best version (IMO) of the often filmed Three Godfathers (1936) story.

 

Plus, your last opportunity to see the new TCM documentary "Watch the Skies", which will be aired twice more.

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