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A Great Movie Alert!


path40a
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Path, the last time Testament of Dr Mabuse was shown, I believe it was supposed to have been a version where original footage had been added. Then there was some question at the time whether that new version was actually shown or not. Pertaining to this, do you have an idea about the upcoming one.

 

A note about The Shanghai Gesture. This is quite a movie. Pauline Kael, longtime movie critique of the New Yorker magazine, never quite knew what to make of this film. Is it supposed to be taken for real or is it nothing more than an over-the-top camp extravaganza? Starring Victor Mature and Gene Tierney. This was shown on AMC back in the old days but I don't remember it ever being shown on TCM though I may be wrong. I had totally forgotten about this movie and am looking forward to seeing it again. A real tour-de-force type flick.

 

(I always hate to post on this thread so soon after Path's weekly alert because it gets in the way of all that good info. With this mind, I urge readers to scroll up and have a look at Path's latest of Oct 5.)

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lux, you are ALWAYS welcome to post to this thread. In fact, it's become rather boring in that all the TCM picks are my own. I used to get a lot of good suggestions from others here, who've helped me to find "hidden gems" on the schedule, and hope that you (and others) will feel free to contribute here when I've left something out (which is usually because I haven't seen it yet;-)

 

Unfortunately I do not know whether the "Testament of Dr. Mabuse" airing will include any additional footage. My Now Playing guide shows the same length (122 minutes) as imdb.com does for this film, so I doubt it. Ironically, my VCR cut off the last few minutes of this when I taped it earlier this year, so I'm looking forward to seeing the ending myself this time.

 

I appreciate your comments about The Shanghai Gesture; I made some more of my own in the capsule review on my site. For instance, I hope that others will not watch it and give up on Gene Tierney (e.g. thinking she is a bad actress).

 

Thanks for your input; I hope you'll continue to add to this thread with your valuable comments.

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#oct21

 

including a handful of gems like Bright Victory (1951), Gambit (1966), & The Great Man Votes (1939) in addition to the beginning of this Halloween month's main focus on the films of Alfred Hitchcock, featuring many TCM premieres like Richard Schickel's "The Men Who Made The Movies" documentary, Juno and the Paycock (1930), The Skin Game (1931), & The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934). Also, an Ernst Lubitsch silent I've not seen titled The Eyes of the Mummy (1918) and an unadvertised tribute to director William Wyler NEXT Thursday, 10/27.

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Since you mentioned Bright Victory, I've got to mention a gaffe I noticed the first time I watched it. It's at the very beginning of the movie. Arthur Kennedy and some other guys (including Rock Hudson) are patrolling in a truck and for some reason have to get out of the truck. They are ambushed and Kennedy takes a position behind a fellow soldier who's supposed to be dead. However, when Kennedy fires his gun, the actor flinches very noticeably. And he's supposed to be dead. Other than that unintentionally funny moment, it's a good movie. But watch for that.

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O.K. Helen, I just watched this again and couldn't find the "flinch" as you describe it. In fact, Arthur Kennedy doesn't even fire his gun. However, when he's positioned behind the Jeep (hiding from the snipers), Kennedy's foot dislodges the man who's lying dead behind it ... which could be misconstrued for a gaffe, but after several rewinds and viewings, appear to be consistent with his bumping an otherwise immobile person.

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm

 

including the continuation of the salute to Alfred Hitchcock (expect something special to be shown with the airing of Shadow of a Doubt (1943) - did anyone besides me see the Psycho (1960) special Monday night?) with the TCM Premieres Frenzy (1972) & Young and Innocent (1937) and the rarely shown: The Wrong Man (1956), starring Henry Fonda, and The Lodger (1927); a fabulous Halloween lineup including two more TCM Premieres. November begins with another rarely shown gem, Edge of the City (1957), and then a tribute to John Huston followed by the oft-advertised Movie Makeup night and an evening with Joel McCrea.

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#nov4

 

beginning with the TCM premiere of Kameradschaft (1931), which I've not seen, and Black Fury (1935), which I've recently reviewed; also recently reviewed are Rogue Cop (1954) & Tomorrow, the World! (1944) airing the same day as one of feaito's favorites - Portrait of Jennie (1948) with Joseph Cotten & Jennifer Jones; another TCM premiere (I've not seen) is featured on Silent Sunday night - D.W. Griffith's The Battle of the Sexes (1928); then we're treated to an unannounced tribute to Cary Grant which precedes S.O.T.M. Joan Fontaine's first film selections; next Wednesday is Hedy Lamarr's birthday & next Thursday is Claude Rains's, and TCM is celebrating both by showing several of their best films including Hedy's delightful Come Live With Me (1941) (with James Stewart); but the latter of half of Rains's day is fabulous, a tribute to Carole Lombard which includes Ernst Lubitsch's outstanding satire To Be or Not to Be (1942)!

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#nov11

 

and it begins with the TCM premiere of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961), one I've not seen or just don't remember; several World War II films (for those that don't know, November 10th is the Marine Corps 230th Birthday AND, of course, Friday is Veteran's Day!); a repeat of John Barrymore's terrific Counsellor at Law (1933); the second night of Joan Fontaine (TCM's SOTM) films including a great little Musical comedy I just saw called A Damsel in Distress (1937) with Fred Astaire, George Burns & Gracie Allen; a night of "Curses" films including the so so I Married a Witch (1942) with Veronica Lake, Fredric March, and Susan Hayward followed by a repeat of the gloriously colorful The Thief of Bagdad (1940); the third installment of "Make-up in the Movies"; and this month's Guest Programmer, writer Alfred Uhry.

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#nov18

 

including this week's TCM Import (and my all new full review of) Le Jour se l?ve (1939); a night featuring films with (mongo's favorite) Barbara Stanwyck including the Holiday favorite Christmas in Connecticut (1945); an incredible lineup of Harold Lloyd's silents (including several I've not seen!); the two best Joan Fontaine (SOTM) films?; a tribute to Merian C. Cooper which includes an all new documentary I'm King Kong (2005); five Marx Brothers films; and a terrific selection of films for Thanksgiving!

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#nov25

 

including the TCM premiere of David Lean's Oliver Twist (1948); a terrific little thriller called The Secret Partner (1961); the acclaimed Lillian Gish/John Gilbert silent La Boheme (1926); all three That's Entertainment movies followed by one of Mary Lou's favorites Min and Bill (1930) and the interesting curio Hollywood Canteen (1944), and then an eccentric Claude Rains performance in They Won't Forget (1937).

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm

 

which begins the month of December, already! After a Thursday morning lineup of Andy Hardy & Nancy Drew, the channel will celebrate Woody Allen's 70th Birthday with their 2002 Original Documentary and several of his films including the TCM premiere of Shadows and Fog (1992); Friday begins with a birthday tribute to Warren William including many of his Perry Mason films; the weekend boasts three TCM premieres and a Silent Sunday double feature: The Rag Man (1925) & Exit Smiling (1926) - both with new scores by Linda Martinez (who committed suicide last May); Bing Crosby's first night as December's SOTM includes three TCM premieres and follows a morning birthday tribute to two great directors (Fritz Lang & Otto Preminger); a terrific film you may not have seen, with another outstanding performance by Edward G. Robinson, will be shown next Tuesday, Our Vines Have Tender Grapes (1945); and after a day of films about Queens, TCM will celebrate Eli Wallach's 90th birthday on Pearl Harbor Day.

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#dec8

 

which starts with one of Mary Lou's favorites, 49th Parallel (1941), followed by an Ernest Lehman birthday salute (several of the great films he wrote will be shown); a great selection of films featuring one of my favorites, Kirk Douglas, on his birthday precedes the only showing of (what I think is) the best of the Three Godfathers (1936) films; the TCM premieres of The Four Feathers (1939) & The Scarlet Pimpernel (1935) followed by a little gem called Vacation from Marriage (1945), all produced by Alexander Korda; the hilarious (don't miss it!) Howard Hawks directed, Billy Wilder written comedy Ball of Fire (1941) starring Barbara Stanwyck (in the title role), Gary Cooper, and several others; several films with Frank Sinatra on his birthday including one of Mongo's favorite, On the Town (1949), followed by 3 of the Bob Hope & Bing Crosby (SOTM) road pictures; a pretty good, if unknown early Katharine Hepburn film title A Woman Rebels (1936) followed later that day by a repeat showing of the new King Kong (1933) print & the excellent documentary on the great ape's creator Merian C. Cooper; and lastly, a 24 hour salute to Shakespeare which includes FOUR TCM premieres, of which, don't miss the Academy Award winning Best Picture Hamlet (1948)!

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#dec15

 

including several new reviews and TCM premieres! Some highlights include another airing of the original, newly remastered King Kong (1933) and the fascinating all new original documentary about the great ape's 'creator' Merian C. Cooper; an outstanding Sunday, December 18th lineup which eventually ends (at 3 AM ET) with the essential comedy Bachelor Mother (1939), which stars Ginger Rogers, David Niven & Charles Coburn; Bing Crosby's SOTM night will feature the Academy Award winning Best Picture Going My Way (1944); Irene Dunne's birthday lineup includes The White Cliffs of Dover (1944); and finally the TCM premiere of an another all new documentary about Budd Boetticher.

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#dec22

 

including 4 straight days of Christmas Classics followed by the last day of SOTM Bing Crosby films, the last day of "See the Original", and a Sidney Sheldon tribute. One might also note the unannounced salutes to Robert Stack and Stanley Kubrick.

 

Have a VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS everyone!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've completed my TCM Picks for the rest of the year:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm

 

which includes Friday's (tomorrow's) salute to Gershwin tunes and an excellent lineup for anyone (like me) who loves Musicals. If you've not seen Rhapsody in Blue (1945), which I did recently, you should - Robert Alda gives a terrific performance in his screen debut. Saturday's theme is The End is Near, meaning that several sci-fi classics are being featured (quite a change from last year's rock concert films, which I've still yet to see).

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I've added a couple of more days to my TCM Picks including Mel Brooks original comedy The Producers (1968) and the first installment of January's SOTM Robert Montgomery. I'm behind because I took an extended Christmas vacation. I should be able to resume my normal weekly alert by Tuesday, January 3 (for those who care). Until then, I'll be updating my site a couple of days at a time.

 

Happy New Year everyone!

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm

 

which includes the TCM premiere of Carmen Jones (1954) this evening; a Jane Wyman birthday tribute tomorrow including the recently premiered Frank Capra film Here Comes the Groom (1951) with Bing Crosby and one I've not seen, Richard Burton's The Spy Who Came in From the Cold (1965); the first night of TCM's salute to Hayao Miyazaki and anime on Thursday; a Loretta Young birthday tribute on Friday followed by the great Anthony Mann-James Stewart Western Winchester '73 (1950); the weekend brings several more terrific movies including Sahara (1943), Paper Moon (1973), The Awful Truth (1937), & The Harder They Fall (1956), which was Humphrey Bogart's last film; on Monday, the second night of TCM's SOTM Robert Montgomery films will be shown which actually continues through Tuesday morning when a sweet little gem called Sins of the Children (1930) will air, followed by a great day of some of the channel's best known classics; and finally, on Wednesday, The Big Heat (1953)!

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#jan12

 

beginning with a birthday tribute to double Best Actress Oscar winner Luise Rainer on the morning of the second night of Hayao Miyazaki's anime films; Friday is Kay Francis's birthday salute and if you haven't seen One Way Passage (1932), here's your chance; this weekend, don't miss John Garfield's performance in Force of Evil (1948) or one of my favorites, A Place in the Sun (1951) - there are also a couple of other films being shown which I've recently reviewed and one I requested, Annie Oakley (1935) with Barbara Stanwyck in the title role; Monday is not only the third installment of Star of the Month Robert Montgomery's films, but you can catch one of feaito's favorites, Dodsworth (1936), and both versions of Imitation of Life; all that and yet Tuesday is probably the best night of the week - both A Foreign Affair (1948) and the TCM premiere of Brief Encounter (1945) are being shown; and Wednesday is Cary Grant's birthday which includes several Vincent Price movies and TCM premieres like House of Usher (1960), which was just added to the National Film Registry!

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#jan19

 

which includes one of the Hayao Miyazaki films I've actually seen (which my kids loved) My Neighbor Totoro (1988). Another I've seen which is not being shown is Kiki's Delivery Service (which I'd also recommend); Friday, TCM will air John Ford's The Hurricane (1937), which was discussed here on these boards recently; this weekend, you can catch the infrequently shown World War III thriller Fail Safe (1964) on Saturday or John Wayne's first Oscar nominated performance in The Sands of Iwo Jima (1949); then, don't miss the terrific SOTM Robert Montgomery pre-codes When Ladies Meet (1933) or The Mystery of Mr. X (1934); Tuesday features 2005 Young Film Composers winner Marcus Sjowall's original score for the film Souls for Sale (1923) and the four hour version of Greed (1924); and Wednesday features Spencer Tracy's only pairing with Bette Davis in the above average prison drama 20,000 Years in Sing Sing (1932) followed by the remake which is just as good, Castle on the Hudson (1940), with John Garfield and Ann Sheridan.

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Please don't miss this film or you will kick yourself for doing so:

 

Brief Encounter (1945)

TCM Jan 17 10:00pm

Movies, 90 Mins.

 

**** (Rated NR)

A married British woman and a doctor meet first at a train station, then fall in love but decide to part.

 

Cast: Celia Johnson, Trevor Howard, Stanley Holloway, Cyril Raymond, Joyce Carey, Everley Gregg, Margaret Barton, Dennis Harkin, Valentine Dyall, Marjorie Mars, Nuna Davey, Wilfrid Babbage, Irene Handl, Edward Hodge, Sydney Bromley, Avis Scott, Henrietta Vincent, Richard Thomas, George V. Sheldon, Wally Bosco.

Director: David Lean.

Producer: Noel Coward.

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