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A Great Movie Alert!


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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#feb23

 

31 Days of Oscar month continues for about 10 more days, and includes Lili (1953), lots of TCM premieres like Lovers and Other Strangers (1970) & This Sporting Life (1963), the hilarious "don't miss it" comedy Merrily We Live (1938), two from the 1970's worth seeing: The Conversation (1974) & The Buddy Holly Story (1978), and a couple of Best Picture winners including From Here to Eternity (1953).

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I'm so glad you remembered to tell everybody about Merrily We Live. I hope they took your advise and recorded it. It may be some time before it's on again, what a great film!

 

Dizzy society matron Emily Kilbourne has a habit of hiring ex-cons and hobos as servants. Her latest find is a handsome "tramp" who shows up at her doorstep and soon ends up in a chauffeur's uniform. He also catches the eye of her pretty Geraldine.

 

Good work Path40a.

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There is no such thing as a "ex" Nazi. The character in the movie was what he had always been. The dinner table scene when he declares " Marx wasn't a German he was a Jew" says it all. Same thing goes for "The Odessa File". The characters were still true to the ideology that put them in power.

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm

 

31 Days of Oscar "month" ends this Friday (actually, early Saturday morning) and includes one of mongo's favorites The Last Picture Show (1971); the month of March brings us a new guest programmer, Sid Ganis - president of AMPAS, who informally continues Oscar month on Saturday (the night before this year's awards ceremony) with selections like Susan Hayward's Oscar winning performance in I Want to Live! (1958); John Gilbert's Desert Nights (1929) marks the return of Silent Sunday nights; next Monday, the first night Nelson Eddy & Jeanette MacDonald (TCM's March Stars of the Month) features an excellent line-up of perhaps their best films and a documentary; and Tuesday includes the first installment of another theme, Divorce Remorse movies, most of which feature Cary Grant.

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Thanks for the heads up on "The Last Picture Show", Path. It is indeed one of my favorites, an end of an era for the local neighborhood movie theaters.

You can be sure I'll be watching it.

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Thanks, I hope everyone who wanted to watch the LPS got a chance to see it because it's not currently scheduled to air again anytime soon. FWIW, for those who noticed that three of my Wednesday picks had "review forthcoming" when I posted this week's reminder, you'll notice that I've completed watching and reviewing those films now.

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#mar9

 

and to follow-up last week's post, you might want to check out A Song is Born (1948), which premiered on TCM a few months ago, this Wednesday night (8 PM ET). Even though it's a remake (of Ball of Fire (1941)), it's still pretty good. Another entertaining (Western) remake will air on Thursday night, The Spoilers (1942), as John Wayne & Randolph Scott battle over Marlene Dietrich. On Friday, several lesser known (B) pictures will be shown including Lee Tracy, Eugene Pallette, & the beautiful Lupe Velez starring in a pretty good comedy called The Half-Naked Truth (1933), which is followed by a terrific gem, What Every Woman Knows (1934), featuring Helen Hayes's last performance before she quit making movies for nearly 20 years. Saturday, The Hustler (1961) will usher in a new season of TCM Essentials; it will be followed by the very first Jack Lemmon-Walter Matthau comedy (from writer/director Billy Wilder), The Fortune Cookie (1966). The second helpings of Nelson Eddy & Jeanette MacDonald (TCM's SOTM) and Divorce Remorse are followed by a salute to Busby Berkeley's unique choreography next Wednesday which will kick off with one I've been looking forward to seeing for some time now, Footlight Parade (1933).

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#mar16

 

including 5 TCM premieres (3 on Thursday night alone) and LOTS of B movies throughout as well. Some of the week's highlights include A Night to Remember (1958) & Germania Anno Zero (1948) on Friday; a selection of Maureen O'Hara films beginning Saturday evening; six Charley Chase silent shorts late Sunday (early Monday); the (SsOTM) Nelson and Jeanette: America's Singing Sweethearts (1993) documentary; this week's "Divorce Remorse" installment includes the hilarious W.S. Van Dyke comedy I Love You Again (1940) with William Powell & Myrna Loy; Wednesday's salute to Arthur Hiller features the other 2 TCM premieres.

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In case you didn't know, stoney, I list all TCM premieres (e.g. as a public service) since it's not obvious, unless one subscribes to the Now Playing Guide, which films on the schedule are being shown on the channel for the very first time.

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path, what would you think of the idea of asking the TCM message board people to start a new main topic on the main board index called ?Great Movie Alert?, so we can all find it and see it every day?

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Fred;-)

 

I'm not sure how threads in the General folder are any easier to find than those in this Favorites folder. In fact, I think the topics in the less active (in terms of new topics created and/or updated each day) folders are easier to find. However, if you want to start a new "Great Movie Alert" thread in that folder, have at it.

 

OTOH, if you're proposing that the TCM administrator create a new folder exclusively for "Great Movie Alerts", I personally don't think that one is needed (nor would one likely be provided).

 

Regarding this particular thread, it's been here for more than two years now, so most people know where it is and how to find (or avoid;-) it. I've said it once and I'll say it again, this thread is NOT meant to be my exclusive domain. You are (and anyone else is) more than welcome to post "Great Movie Alerts" here. I don't know why more participants don't feel free to do this; I used to get a lot of good movie suggestions (e.g. films I haven't seen) from other board members here (yes, some no longer participate), though infrequently, in the past.

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I check in to "A Great Movie Alert" about twice a week to make sure I'm not forgetting any film that I want to see that I may have overlooked. It's easy to find because you never have to go any further than page 2 and it will be there.

 

Some films I am looking forward to that are coming up this weekend are:

The Swan (1956) with Grace Kelly and Alec Guinness, The Mask of Dimitrios (1944) with Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre, and one that I missed last month, the Robert Altman film Nashville (1975).

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm#mar23

 

which begins with a birthday salute to director Akira Kurosawa followed by a repeat showing of this season's first TCM Essential, The Hustler (1961); the following day, Steve McQueen is honored with a birthday salute which ends with a pretty good documentary about the actor; Saturday evening's programming includes a selection of director David Lean's films and features the TCM premiere of This Happy Breed (1944); Sunday's lineup includes a repeat of the Deanna Durbin hit One Hundred Men and a Girl (1939), the TCM premiere of Cliff Robertson's Oscar winning performance as Charly (1968), a repeat of an excellent newer film, Awakenings (1990), and the TCM premiere of the silent The Red Lily (1924); Monday is the last day of the channel's salute to March's Stars of the Month, Nelson Eddy & Jeanette MacDonald; Tuesday, child actor Freddie Bartholomew's birthday is saluted with some terrific films and the last night of "Divorce Remorse" includes a pretty entertaining lineup as well; next Wednesday's daytime selections are OUTSTANDING and that evening's programming is filled with Robert Osborne's picks, beginning with a repeat showing of This Sporting Life (1963) and THREE TCM premieres!

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This week's TCM Picks have been posted:

 

http://www.classicfilmguide.com/index.php?s=tcm

 

and they include the TCM premiere of Fear Strikes Out (1957) before a new month begins, which starts appropriately with a salute to film's fools, one classic each from many of the medium's best comedians or comedy teams. Doris Day's birthday salute is topped by the TCM premiere of The King and I (1956), which serves as an early introduction to April's SOTM Deborah Kerr. Additionally, the work of cinematographer James Wong Howe will be celebrated throughout the month on Tuesdays; next Tuesday (really, early Wednesday) also includes Lon Chaney's The Unknown (1927) with Joan Crawford, and Wednesday's lineup includes two more TCM premieres.

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I neglected to include this Sunday's silent feature, The Merry Widow (1925), which I've not seen. It was directed by Erich von Stroheim and features Mae Murray and John Gilbert. I apologize for this oversight.

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?You may be right, this thread only gets about 40 views a day.?

 

Only when it?s currently active. Most other times it slips under the radar and disappears. 4 messages in 2 weeks is not very active.

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