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Why the recent 1970s films?


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Some more "classic" blaxploitation movies:

 

Abby (1974)

 

Across 110th Street (1972)

 

Black Belt Jones (1974)

 

Black Mama, White Mama (1972)

 

Black Shampoo (1976)

 

Blacksnake (1972)

 

Boss **** (1975)

 

Cleopatra Jones (1973)

 

Cleopatra Jones and the Casino of Gold (1975)

 

Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970)

 

Darktown Strutters (1975)

 

Detroit 9000 (1973)

 

Dolemite (1975)

 

Ebony, Ivory & Jade (1976)

 

Get Christie Love! (1974)

 

Hammer (1972)

 

The Mack (1973)

 

Mandingo (1975)

 

Passion Plantation (1976)

 

Shaft (1971) - To the best of my knowledge, this is the only blaxploitation film to win an Oscar AND earn a spot in the National Film Registry... WOW.

 

Shaft's Big Score (1972)

 

Shaft in Africa (1973)

 

Shaft: The Movie-Length TV Series (1973-1974)

 

Super Fly (1972)

 

Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971)

 

Sheba, Baby (1975)

 

Space Is the Place (1974)

 

Sparkle (1976)

 

Three the Hard Way (1974)

 

Halls of Anger (1970)

 

Trick Baby (1973)

 

Trouble Man (1972)

 

Truck Turner (1974)

 

Willie Dynamite (1974)

 

They Call Me MISTER Tibbs! (1970) and The Organization (1971) - The official sequels to In the Heat of the Night (yes, you read that right.)

 

Black Jesus (1968)

 

Also:

 

Jackie Brown (1997) - Quentin Tarantino's "revival" of the blaxploitation genre, featuring an all-star cast.

 

Shaft (2000) - The remake that everyone was waiting for!

 

Black Jesus (2008) - Another remake that everyone has been waiting for.

 

Also, the James Bond franchise once took on some elements of blaxploitation during the heyday of the genre, in the movie Live and Let Die (1973). (The plot involved many black and blaxploitation themes, including drugs and voodoo.)

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Julia

The Deer Hunter

Kramer Vs. Kramer

One Flew Over the Cukoo's Nest (only one of 3 to win top three Oscars)

Cabaret

both Godfathers

Patton

Klute

French Connection

Annie Hall

Normae Rae

All The Presidents Men

That is what immediatley comes to mind all in a matter of a few seconds. Everyone is worthy to be a classic.

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"Why is TCM playing 1970s films all of the sudden? Is this just for the 30 days of oscar or is it going to be like this forever?" - Chaplin1925

 

Ignore the rabble below.

To answer your question seriously, here's TCM's official press release on the February schedule.

http://www.turnerinfo.com/pressroom.aspx?P=TCM

 

"Taking its annual 31 DAYS OF OSCAR? film festival to an entirely new level, Turner Classic Movies (TCM) will showcase the depth of its movie library by devoting each night in February to a decade of Oscar?-winning and nominated films—all uncut and commercial free. Mondays in primetime will be devoted to films of the 1920s and 1930s, Tuesdays to the 1940s, Wednesdays to the 1950s and so forth throughout each week, with Sundays showcasing movies from the 1990s to the present."

 

“In this, the 14th year we’ve presented TCM’s 31 DAYS OF OSCAR, we are really showing off our movie library, which is without a doubt the biggest and best in the industry,” said Charlie Tabesh, senior vice president of programming for TCM. “By dedicating each night to a particular decade and each day to a specific theme, we prove that no other network can celebrate the Academy Awards with the breadth of TCM.”

 

 

If you are curious about upcoming programming for TCM see here -

March 2008

http://www.tcm.com/schedule/month/?cid=&timezone=PST&oid=3/1/2008

which includes a world premiere documentary on Pre-code Hollywood and a Star Of The Month salute to Acting Families.

 

April 2008

http://www.tcm.com/schedule/month/?cid=&timezone=PST&oid=4/1/2008

which includes Star Of The Month Hedy Lamarr, a documentary on Abel Gance and the premiere of Easy Living.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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>with Sundays showcasing movies from the 1990s to the present."

 

Who wants to see movies from the 1990s to the present? They have already been showing on other channels. The other channels are filled up with modern movies.

 

We come here to see old and classic movies, from the "Golden Age of Hollywood".

 

This month will have the least exciting and least classic and most useless modern movies on the air than any other year since TCM started in 1994.

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Steel Magnolias (1989) has been shown on cable TV hundreds of times.

 

On Golden Pond (1981) has been re-run several times during this past year.

 

Absence of Malice (1981) has been shown on other channels dozens of times.

 

We want to see the newly restored copy of "The Story of Temple Drake".

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TCM doesn't need an excuse to air modern movies. They can damn well do as they please, and it doesn't matter what we say one way or the other. They tend to show classics and cool stuff, so I'm fine with them, and I can live with Oscar's month, which I've not liked since 1999.

 

My personal preference is that TCM air films from the 30's and 40's. I take what I can get. I can dig other things as I like films from other eras at times, and depending on what it is.

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"Who wants to see movies from the 1990s to the present? "

 

If TCM is going to present a month saluting all eighty years of the Academy Awards, then, in that context, these films belong here as much as silent films from the 20s. I think it is audacious, enlightening and astounding that any television channel has undertaken such an event.

 

You and others may have been happy to see the same "31 Days..." that TCM presented two years ago, five years ago or even ten years ago. But alot of us - including, obviously, TCM - would have found that repetitive, uninspired and, well...boring. And the last thing TCM would want is people thinking "Move along. There's nothing new to see here."

 

"We come here to see old and classic movies, from the "Golden Age of Hollywood".

 

You watch TCM for those reasons. Not everyone watches TCM for those reasons. And, thankfully, TCM is not being programmed only for those reasons either. (You make it sound like one can no longer see those films on TCM. Have you written anything appreciative about Mondays and Tuesdays this month?)

 

You might as well get used to the idea that Charles Burnett and Abel Gance, "Bienvenue A Cannes" and "Thou Shalt Not: Sex, Sin and Censorship in Pre-Code Hollywood" and Eighty Years Of The Academy Awards are going to co-exist on the TCM schedule side by side - today, tomorrow and just like always.

 

It may be a bitter pill for you but you've got swallow it.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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>Anything released after 1989 does not belong on TCM.

 

My opinion is that the '30s and the '40s, and a few years into the '50s were the peak "Golden Age" of films. There were, of course, some classics made in the teens and '20s and a few in every other decade, but not as many as during the peak decades.

 

But by the '60s the quality of Hollywood films began to taper off, and the fall of the studio system in the late '60s was the beginning of the end of regular good movies turned out by Hollywood. The entire style of lighting and photography changed in the late '60s so that flat frontal lighting became the rule (with almost no creative shadows), and one-camera position setups were over used, as were zoom lenses. The independent companies just don't take the time to shoot quality films like the studios did in the old days.

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>If TCM is going to present a month saluting all eighty years of the Academy Awards, then, in that context

 

I didn't sign up for the "second tier" on Direct TV and pay extra for it to see "all eighty years of the Academy Awards". I signed up and pay extra to see the films of the "Golden Age" of Hollywood, from the '30s through the early '50s, and some early silents, and a very few later "classics".

 

I haven't paid any attention to the Academy Awards or the Awards show since around 1965. The Academy Awards are meaningless when all the films they have to pick from are turkeys.

 

If TCM wants to spotlight these modern Academy Award films, then let the Academy pay my Direct TV bill.

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>They can damn well do as they please, and it doesn't matter what we say one way or the other.

 

And people who pay extra for the second tier of programming can drop that second tier any time they want to and put their money into buying old classic DVDs from the cheapest sources.

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