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GWTW Named All Time Favorite in Poll


MissGoddess
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Hey LZ:"I would imagine that many who auditioned for the part were breathing a sigh of relief when they started to hear the stories of the grueling hours shooting the movie, going through numerous writers, directors and having to deal with David O. Selznick."

 

Nahhhh, you're wrong. It's just like women with a parsel full o' kids who continues to forget the labor pains during delivery. How do you think they felt after the picture was a fait accompli? Is it worth it to go through hell to have a finished product like THAT??

 

Hey Frank...again, as usual, the screencaps are great. And yes, that one shot of her in the red dress sums her up. If she HAS to face the adversity, she'll have that one eyebrow cocked and walk into it. Scarlett, I swear...

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FranklyMyDearGrimes -- I think that we all would agree that in the case of certain films, the casting decisions are paramount. For GWTW, as an example, the casting of *Vivian Leigh* was extremely important and, given the number of actresses considered and given screen tests, it would not be a stretch to conclude that the director of the screen tests was the most critical element of the movie's success.

 

Coincidently, I just happened to learn today in starting to read a book critically analyzing the work of a certain director, that *Selznick* plucked him from Broadway semi-obscurity and hired him as a talent scout and director of screen tests for several movies, including GWTW.

 

The director? Why, Anthony Mann, of course. Now begins a complete reevaluation of the movie.

 

P.S. *Mann* also directed the screen tests for REBECCA. Luckily there is no evidence that *Samuel Fuller* or *John Cassavetes* directed screen tests for any *John Ford* movies. If otherwise, my entire world would be turned upside down.

 

Message was edited by: ChiO

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P.S. Mann also directed the screen tests for REBECCA. Luckily there is no evidence that Samuel Fuller or John Cassavetes directed screen tests for any John Ford movies. If otherwise, my entire world would be turned upside down

 

:P:P:P:P

 

ChiO!! What's the book about Mann called? I've been looking for a good biography about him. I especially want to know what it has to say about that MAN of the West.

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*What's the book about Mann called?*

 

It has the electrifying title of Anthony Mann. Written by Jeanine Basinger (Wesleyan University Press). Originally published in 1979, a "new and expanded edition" came out in 2007. Be forewarned: It is not a "biography". The author laments that there is very little information on his life outside of the films he directed; it is a critical "biography" of his films.

 

Eleven pages are devoted to MAN OF THE WEST in the chapter entitled -- hold on to your ten-gallon hat -- Mann of the West.

 

I've just started reading it. As best as I can tell, the focus is on his Westerns and, therefore -- unfortunately (in some quarters) -- his films noir may be short-changed. I, of course, immediately upon receipt went to the Index and read the pages on John Alton.

 

I can't recall now (too many martinis in the interim -- what, you thought red-eye or Irish whiskey?) whether I ordered it through Amazon or Powell Books.

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My Main MANN, ChiO -- I think that we all would agree that in the case of certain films, the casting decisions are paramount.

 

I'm with ya. Viv's portrayal of "Scarlett" has actually become my favorite female performance to date. Can you tell I'm a sucker for emotionally-erratic women? Scarlett is at the top of the heap for me.

 

For GWTW, as an example, the casting of Vivian Leigh was extremely important and, given the number of actresses considered and given screen tests, it would not be a stretch to conclude that the director of the screen tests was the most critical element of the movie's success.

 

Is that so? Hmmmm. Mischief is afoot.

 

Coincidently, I just happened to learn today in starting to read a book critically analyzing the work of a certain director, that Selznick plucked him from Broadway semi-obscurity and hired him as a talent scout and director of screen tests for several movies, including GWTW.

 

The director? Why, Anthony Mann, of course. Now begins a complete reevaluation of the movie.

 

Fascinating! I never knew this. Selznick does have an eye for talent: Mann and Lewton.

 

P.S. Mann also directed the screen tests for REBECCA.

 

I didn't know this, either. The Rebecca DVD has some screen test footage on it, too. The shots are very basic; not much movement in the scenes that were included on the DVD.

 

Luckily there is no evidence that Samuel Fuller or John Cassavetes directed screen tests for any John Ford movies. If otherwise, my entire world would be turned upside down.

 

:D That one got a huge laugh out of me.

 

How can one write a Mann book without delving into his films noir?

 

Hola, My Main Pain, Goddess -- Well, perhaps she's some kind of angel, sweet I'm not sure about.

 

Scarlett is a very sweet angel... in her own special way.

 

I adore that scene! Scarlett is so very much herself! She doesn't care a thing in the world if only she can have fun. That ball has so many moments like that...when she pretends to give her wedding ring "for the cause" and when she's seen tapping her feet when she's supposed to be a serious and decorous young widow. And Rhett sees it all.

 

Did I mention that Scarlett was an unselfish sweet angel? :D

 

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A beautiful scene, quite unlike any other in movies when you think about it. Poor Scarlett, dreaming she's wandering lost in the dark and the fog....the dark and the fog? A film noir! I told you so!

 

It's a very dark film. :D Scarlett IS my very favorite femme fatale, though. Rhett couldn't resist grabbing that tigress by the tail. I'm pretty sure Rhett will look to grab her tail later on, too. That's my epilogue.

 

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Healthy food is "bleh" and "double bleh". It's more like grazing in a meadow than sitting down to a meal.

 

I remember that in the book it talked about how Scarlett went overboard spending Rhett's money in New Orleans, after all the poverty of the war. And it also made reference to her somewhat gaudy taste---she liked everything flashy and big as life, that's why she's shown decked out like a Christmas Tree here.

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Now that I have your attention, guess what's airing at 10:00am Friday morning???

 

You always have my attention, T.

 

The truth is, I actually watched The Letter the night you asked me to and I have read your wonderful write-up on the film. I just need to get my tail over to your thread and make some comments.

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Healthy food is "bleh" and "double bleh". It's more like grazing in a meadow than sitting down to a meal.

 

As a waiter tells Garbo, after she asks for all-vegetarian fare in NINOTCHKA, "This is a restaurant, madam, not a meadow" (screenplay by Charles Brackett, Billy Wilder and Walter Reisch).

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  • 3 weeks later...

Food always looks so good in the movies, doesn't it? I want to go to a restaurant where they have 40 plates of food lined up and just waiting for you to dig in.....

 

Yes, it does. :) I get hungry, even if I've just eaten, whenever I see a particularly appetizing meal in a movie. Especially if they're eating bread---fresh baked bread! I can almost smell it!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Not that I like rubbing it in....BUT I DO!!!

 

Gone with the Wind---the novel by Margaret Mitchell---was just named in a poll as the favorite book after The Bible by Americans:

 

http://www.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20080408005148&newsLang=en

 

So tomorrow continues to be another day for Miss Scarlett! :D

 

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Not that I like rubbing it in....BUT I DO!!!

 

What, the poison?

 

I guess a lot of men really love "Gone with the Wind." :P

 

The Second Favorite Book among Different Groups

 

While The Bible is number one among each of the different demographic groups,

there is a large difference in the number two favorite book. For men, that belongs

to Lord of the Rings while women cite Gone with the Wind as their number two.

There is also a generational divide. For Echo Boomers (those aged 18-31) their

second favorite is the Harry Potter series while Generation X (those aged 32-43)

is split between The Stand and Angels and Demons. Baby Boomers (those aged

44-62) and Matures (those aged 63 and older) think alike and both cite Gone with

the Wind.

 

While it?s not surprising that Gone with the Wind is the second favorite book in

the South, it?s also number two in the Midwest. Easterners are more partial to the

Lord of the Rings series and Westerners cite The Stand as their second favorite

book. Whites and Hispanics also say Gone with the Wind is their second favorite

while African Americans say it is Angels and Demons. Educational levels have

the largest differences. Those with high school or less education cite Gone with

the Wind as their second favorite book of all time while Americans with some

college education say it is The Stand. College graduates go to Lord of the Rings

and those with a post graduate education are tied as both Lord of the Rings and

To Kill a Mockingbird come in number two for them.

 

Finally, they may not agree on candidates, but one thing that brings together

partisans is their favorite book. For Republicans, Democrats and Independents,

the top two books are the same ? The Bible followed by Gone with the Wind.

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I'm trying to figure out where I fit in to this equation, as a female, democrat-ish Gen-Xer.

 

The Bible is not my favorite book-I have nothing against it, though.

 

I love and have read the LOTR trilogy more than once, but I wouldn't say it's my *favorite*. Ditto Harry Potter. Ditto The Stand.

 

Is it my innate Northwest inability to decide?

 

Also, I've only read GWTW once and seen it once-I think I need my classic films to have more sultry glances and double crossings. Interestingly enough, most of the friends I have from the South consider GWTW to be practically sacred and they watch every year at least once.

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Hi, Minya -- I think all of what you said makes you unique and on the

"against-the-grain" side of the coin, especially the "sultry glances and double

crossings" part. I usually don't like being lumped in with the masses myself.

It tends to make me shudder. I do like my share of popular things but, for the

most part, I've always been someone who sought comfort in being different. I'm

not a big "me, too-er." This is why I tend to be very open-minded. It's also why

I'm generally attracted to opposites.

 

Interestingly enough, most of the friends I have from the South consider GWTW

to be practically sacred and they watch every year at least once.

 

Hmmmmmm, this sounds awfully familiar to me. :);)

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Wow, Frankie, really *Gone with the Wind* as #2 book?

 

I'm a baby boomer, mid-century modern myself, and would not pick chose #1 or #2 as my faves.

 

Wonder what that says about me?

 

How about favorite book:

 

those with a post graduate education are tied as both Lord of the Rings and

To Kill a Mockingbird come in number two for them. >>

 

*To Kill a Mockingbird* . Must be that post grad degree I *never* went for but the movie is ingrained in my DNA and I read the book when I was eleven and have loved it ever since.

 

#2 favorite book ( a tie):

 

*The Civil War* by Shelby Foote (way more historically accurate and much better read than *GWTW*) Though when I was young, I loved the book very much. But as I got older I still like the book, love the movie but would not rate either one as my #2 favorite. And I have Southern roots, go figure.

 

*The Parade's Gone By* by Kevin Brownlow.

 

So I guess that begs the question with me, which came first my love of history or my love of movies?

 

My love of movies. I think.

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