Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Gloria Grahame a complete package


Recommended Posts

Mo,

 

As always, all of us who are just satellites in the galaxy of you and Glo (and the extened family including Mother Molo) wish you the very happiest of birthdays.

 

May you and Glo and the 7 little Glolos have a memorable celebration.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there Ro!

 

Glad you could stop in for the party. I guess we should start winding things down though. The sun has been up for hours! That must have been some lemonade! ;)

 

Thanks so much for remembering my birthday despite your busy schedule! Come by more often. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Lynn,

 

Thanks for the nice birthday wishes. Gloria and I could never conquer "the greatest evil ever" without you at our side! Now if you'll excuse me, Nick and Nora want one last round. Thanks for coming! :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=molo14 wrote:}{quote}

> Hi Bronxie,

>

> Gloria sure knows how to throw a party too! I'm loving it! Thank you!

>

> What a wonderful 39th birthday!! ;)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You and Jack Benny, eh? But you're really 39, right? A youngster!

I'm so upset, I saw this remarkable photo of an apparently candid Gloria taken in what looks like the early 60's. It's a head shot, and she has a beautiful "ladies-who-lunch" hairstyle, very Beverly Hills chic, and her face is mature yet beautiful, weary, a bit lined, with a sort of "faded" glamour, but extremely flattering, and quite haunting even. Well, I should have uploaded it immediately as my gift to you, because now I cannot find it anywhere, and don't know what words I used to click it on. Perhaps someone will remember which image that was and bring it forth.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=Bronxgirl48 wrote:}{quote}

>

>

> You and Jack Benny, eh? But you're really 39, right? A youngster!

 

Well I'm a huge fan of Jack Benny. I'm 39 in my own mind, which is where it counts. :)

 

As for how many times I've circled the sun...

 

 

> I'm so upset, I saw this remarkable photo of an apparently candid Gloria taken in what looks like the early 60's. It's a head shot, and she has a beautiful "ladies-who-lunch" hairstyle, very Beverly Hills chic, and her face is mature yet beautiful, weary, a bit lined, with a sort of "faded" glamour, but extremely flattering, and quite haunting even. Well, I should have uploaded it immediately as my gift to you, because now I cannot find it anywhere, and don't know what words I used to click it on. Perhaps someone will remember which image that was and bring it forth.

 

I was hunting the web for new photos a few days ago and found some nice "mature" Gloria photos.

 

Here is one:

 

GloriaIronHorse67.jpg?t=1281841568

 

and another:

 

Gloria-older.jpg?t=1281841799

 

I want to credit this guy: http://filmnoirphotos.blogspot.com/2009/11/happy-birthday-gloria-grahame-1923-1981.html (Visit there for more pics. I will be posting a few more eventually.)

 

Now brace yourself for this next one as it's not your everyday glamour shot.

 

I find it really charming:

 

Gloria-curlerswithoscar.jpg?t=1281842048

 

As the guy says on his blog: I imagine her interrupting housework in the 70s to pose for a friend with the Oscar she received for The Bad and the Beautiful (1952).

Link to post
Share on other sites

molo, then I'm "39", too.

 

Hey, you found the photo -- it's the middle one! The first seems like it could be that Outer Limits episode Gloria did called "The Guests". She looks almost little-girlish with her Oscar in the bottom picture; it is kind of sweet!

Link to post
Share on other sites

No matter what life had in store for our lovely double G, no matter what fate awaited her...no one could take away the fact that she won an Academy Award.

 

I'm bringing up the rear here MadHat. So many many happy returns of the day to you. HAPPY BIRTHDAY MOLO.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I watched The Glass Wall last night and I came away rather impressed. I thought it was quite good and very underrated. Is it "The Grapes of Wrath" of film noir? It's definitely one of the better "human rights" films noir. I guess Border Incident, would also be under consideration, especially when you compare the tractor scenes between it and The Grapes of Wrath.

 

I really enjoyed the "man on the run" aspect of The Glass Wall. This is nothing new in film noir, but the entire NYC vibe of it made it fascinating to me.

 

Loved the social commentary of the film. I liked the connections of all the characters struggling to achieve. Two of them are single women. One is a returning vet. The other is our lead, Peter (Vittorio Gassman), who is a concentration camp survivor.

 

SPOILER

 

The ending was very reminiscent of Meet John Doe.

 

Gloria Grahame is wonderful in the film. Her "Maggie Summers" is now one of my favorite characters of hers and one of my favorites of all-time. She's a mix of both bad and good, so it's a nice mix for Gloria. This is actually one of the few times I have seen Gloria not exhibit "sexuality." Very interesting.

 

glasswall1.jpg

 

glasswall2.jpg

 

glasswall3.jpg

 

glasswall4.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool you got subtitles on the DVD.

 

> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> I watched The Glass Wall last night and I came away rather impressed. I thought it was quite good and very underrated. Is it "The Grapes of Wrath" of film noir? It's definitely one of the better "human rights" films noir. I guess Border Incident, would also be under consideration, especially when you compare the tractor scenes between it and The Grapes of Wrath.

>

 

You'll have to explain that comparison. :D

 

> I really enjoyed the "man on the run" aspect of The Glass Wall. This is nothing new in film noir, but the entire NYC vibe of it made it fascinating to me.

>

 

The locations were pretty good, they made the movie breathe a little more.

 

> Loved the social commentary of the film. I liked the connections of all the characters struggling to achieve. Two of them are single women. One is a returning vet. The other is our lead, Peter (Vittorio Gassman), who is a concentration camp survivor.

>

 

I'll have to see it again for the commentary, I don't remember that as strongly.

 

> Gloria Grahame is wonderful in the film. Her "Maggie Summers" is now one of my favorite characters of hers and one of my favorites of all-time. She's a mix of both bad and good, so it's a nice mix for Gloria. This is actually one of the few times I have seen Gloria not exhibit "sexuality." Very interesting.

>

 

It's one of my favorites by her, too. In fact, she made the whole movie for me, though I also liked the story which was very moving. I was desperate that "Jerry" was going to flake out on Peter and I can't tell you how I found myself hating his girlfriend! She was sooooo typical. He has to save someone's life and she's mad because he can't stay at the party.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool you got subtitles on the DVD.

 

You're as pathetic as me. :D

 

You'll have to explain that comparison. :D

 

The powers that be are telling the "displaced" they're not allowed to be there. So the displaced are forced to fight the system in the ways they can. Peter's way to fight is to flee. Both are "human rights" films with dignity at the core.

 

glasswall7.jpg

 

glasswall8.jpg

 

glasswall9.jpg

 

glasswall10.jpg

 

The locations were pretty good, they made the movie breathe a little more.

 

I loved seeing the NYC night, with all the flashing signs and the like.

 

It's one of my favorites by her, too. In fact, she made the whole movie for me, though I also liked the story which was very moving.

 

I really liked Vittorio. You won't find too many leads in film noir to be as compassionate as he.

 

glasswall5.jpg

 

I was desperate that "Jerry" was going to flake out on Peter and I can't tell you how I found myself hating his girlfriend! She was sooooo typical. He has to save someone's life and she's mad because he can't stay at the party.

 

She reminded me of you! :P But, to be fair to her, she wanted Tom to try out for the clarinet job in a band that was big-time for the area. If he gets the job, they can get married. She's been waiting for him for five years. And she worked hard to get him that tryout. I can understand her feeling of desperation.

 

glasswall6.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

>

> The powers that be are telling the "displaced" they're not allowed to be there. So the displaced are forced to fight the system in the ways they can. Peter's way to fight is to flee. Both are "human rights" films with dignity at the core.

>

 

But how is he fighting and what system? He's in New York, not Europe.

 

That speech in those screencaps is remniscent of Tom Joad's "As long

as there's one man that..." speech.

 

> I loved seeing the NYC night, with all the flashing signs and the like.

>

 

I'm surrounded by those lights through my windows on two sides.

 

> I really liked Vittorio. You won't find too many leads in film noir to be as compassionate as he.

>

 

He's adorable. He's so humble and a great portrait of a man who desperately

wants to make a new start.

 

>

> She reminded me of you! :P But, to be fair to her, she wanted Tom to tryout for the clarinet job in a band that was big-time for the area. If he gets the job, they can get married. She's been waiting for him for five years.

>

 

I'm NOTHING like that girl. For goodness sake, doesn't she realize he

wouldn't be there for her to marry if it weren't for the guy?

Link to post
Share on other sites

But how is he fighting and what system? He's in New York, not Europe.

 

It's American law that he's fighting. He's to be deported. If he just sits in the ship, he's going back to where he came. So it's either accept the system or resist it. He flees.

 

That speech in those screencaps is remniscent of Tom Joad's "As long as there's one man that..." speech.

 

You've got it. It's a "human rights" film. I didn't know that's what kind of film it was. It's rather powerful. Heavy-handed? Surely.

 

I'm surrounded by those lights through my windows on two sides.

 

You're in the red light district, Tanya? :P I do like your dance.

 

He's adorable. He's so humble and a great portrait of a man who desperately wants to make a new start.

 

Nicely said. I cannot think of another character in film noir that is like he. You usually find "takers" in film noir not "givers."

 

I'm NOTHING like that girl.

 

You are, too! You would slap your man for choosing some guy you never heard of over you and that gig! I felt for the girl, actually.

 

For goodness sake, doesn't she realize he wouldn't be there for her to marry if it weren't for the guy?

 

She should. But she's feeling some desperation of her own. She believes this is his chance to make it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> It's American law that he's fighting. He's to be deported. If he just sits in the ship, he's going back to where he came. So it's either accept the system or resist it. He flees.

>

 

Oh. I think the stakes in the movie are more personal, though, than GoW.

 

> You've got it. It's a "human rights" film. I didn't know that's what kind of film it was. It's rather powerful. Heavy-handed? Surely.

>

 

In a way, yes. It seemed to be about injustice and about the situation of

refugees after the war.

 

> Nicely said. I cannot think of another character in film noir that is like he. You usually find "takers" in film noir not "givers."

>

 

He's a victim and the "enemy" is a law.

 

> You are, too! You would slap your man for choosing some guy you never heard of over you and that gig! I felt for the girl, actually.

>

 

No.

 

> She should. But she's feeling some desperation of her own. She believes this is his chance to make it.

 

There will be other chances.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh. I think the stakes in the movie are more personal, though, than GoW.

 

In how it's shown, but the speech at the end is more for a group more so than one man.

 

In a way, yes. It seemed to be about injustice and about the situation of refugees after the war.

 

Yes, very much so. Yet another wonderful take on the aftereffects of war via film noir. It's such a fascinating medium.

 

He's a victim and the "enemy" is a law.

 

Excellent! I like that.

 

There will be other chances.

 

But it's been five years. Can she wait another five years? She's feeling it.

 

I really loved the entire desperation angle of the characters in the film. Tanya (Robin Raymond) reminded me of Clo-Clo (Margo) in The Leopard Man. I loved her little scene.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> Yes, very much so. Yet another wonderful take on the aftereffects of war via film noir. It's such a fascinating medium.

>

 

I still say it's a drama. :P

 

>

> But it's been five years. Can she wait another five years? She's feeling it.

>

> I really loved the entire desperation angle of the characters in the film. Tanya (Robin Raymond) reminded me of Clo-Clo (Margo) in The Leopard Man. I loved her little scene.

 

That's interesting...now I have to re=watch *The Leopard Man* to see what you mean!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey you two!

 

I just finished watching it. I liked it a lot. I don't know why I put it off so long. It's too late for me to get into the conversation right now, but I will be back later this evening with my two cents. I like what I've heard so far. talk to you later this evening. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hola, Grahame's Guy -- I just finished watching it. I liked it a lot. I don't know why I put it off so long. It's too late for me to get into the conversation right now, but I will be back later this evening with my two cents. I like what I've heard so far. talk to you later this evening.

 

Terrific! I most certainly look forward to reading your thoughts and feelings on The Glass Wall. If you're a Gloria fan, and I know you are, it's a good "Gloria" role and an entertaining, thoughtful film. It's as if her "Ginny" character in Crossfire has been given more screen time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=molo14 wrote:}{quote}

> Hey you two!

>

> I just finished watching it. I liked it a lot. I don't know why I put it off so long. It's too late for me to get into the conversation right now, but I will be back later this evening with my two cents. I like what I've heard so far. talk to you later this evening. :)

 

Okay I'm a liar!

 

But I will be back to comment "soon". :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Don?t forget, your dead father was a lousy foreigner!?

 

I saw ?The Glass Wall? last nite and I?m afraid I wasn?t so crazy about it, sorry to say. It was a wonderful vehicle for our glorious Double G., though. She tamped down her sexuality big-time

allowing the audience to see that she?s more than just what we know she can be. It killed me to see her being in such a furtive survival mode... living in that squallid little rooming house...stealing coats and money from kids. (But when she ran INTO Central Park with the rep it would have, it made me say ?Yikes, you?re running in THERE?? Her acting out the description of the mundane tedious-ness of her job made me think, "Did you just learn mime at the Actors Studio?? She lives this hand-to-mouth existence and fights off her landlady?s son (go to IMDB and check out Richard Reeves. Now there?s a working actor!) and actually does not trade on her looks which she could in a minute. As I always do, I just love watching Gloria Grahame and am happy to get another one of her performances under my cinematic belt.

 

?The Glass Wall? is Vittorio Gassman's picture all the way and it's also a message about the perils of trying immigrate to the United States...unlawfully. I usually suspend my disbelief in a New York minute with the movies; even the dastardly gets a break in my Maven's head. But something just kept gnawing in the back of my mind about the fact that he stowed away, that he was trying to circumvent the law. The U.S. is welcoming, if you come in the front door. The back door is another story.

 

But 'less you think I?m an uncompassionate meanie, I?ll tell you I did feel for the vital...virile...

Vittorio. (Hey them?s ain?t my words. That?s what the trailer said. And what a wild misleading trailer that was. Loved by three women?? I counted one...and a half). He did go through some harrowing experiences to survive, and that was touching.

 

Desperation is the operative word here, a veritable ?Immigrant?s Excellent (Harrowing) Adventure.? He was like Alice in Wonderland meeting up with all these people in his quest to find Tommy and stay in America. The film also put me to mind a bit of ?They Live By Night.? Always running, never safe, always trying to stay one step ahead, but Cathy O'Donnell is certainly no Gloria Grahame. Sometimes Peter's exploits struck me as a little far-fetched, ?convenient? and that took me out of the pix in spurts.

 

I liked that the officiousness of the Immigration cop changed once Peter?s story was corroborated. He was just following the rules, and maybe his hands were tied in the beginning. Loved the bemused look on the face of his partner as he listened to Peter?s (Gassman) story. But Peter was adorable and scared...and so very very desperate and I did feel that.

 

Robin Raymond made me think of Constance Bennett. And her whole appearance in the film was quite a lesson in acceptance and assimilation. She is the daughter of immigrants. And though she does the bump-and-grind, she has two adorable little blonde haired kids that she has to feed, and allows a stranger to share their bed. (HUH?!) Her mom who I thought at first was going to play your typical movie immigrant mother ("The Public Enemy"), wound up being a very strong matriarch. Her son comes bustin? home all tough guy actor-y. (His performance had my head shaking). He is unequivocally American and wants nothing to do with the old language and culture. Mom puts him in his place when she tells him "Don?t forget, your dead father was a lousy foreigner.? I loved the smack in the face she gave him.

 

So now we believe Peter and there?s a race against time for him to be captured for his own good, and there's some running in place on treadmills. We finally face the glass wall of the United Na-

tions and Peter?s plea for understanding. I winced a bit at his speech, but the message was clear and poignant. Besides, he?s vital and virile and I believe he?ll get his citizenship and the girl, and that's a lucky man, indeed.

 

* * * *

 

"I loved seeing the NYC night, with all the flashing signs and the like.? - < ( Frank Grimes ) >

 

It was great seeing the Times Square I remember as a kid. Teeming, vibrant, dangerous. Now it?s teeming...with tourists, and pretty antiseptic. Meh! As an indie filmmaker, to find out that they filmed this movie guerilla style was GREAT!!!!

 

?I'm surrounded by those lights through my windows on two sides.? - < ( Miss Goddess ) >

 

Yikes.

 

Edited by: CineMaven on Sep 17, 2010 8:28 AM - I would not classify this as film noir. But it could go under the umbrella of other films that talk of the Immigrant experience...and there's many of those.

 

RE-Edited by: CineMaven on Sep 17, 2010 8:34 AM...and P.S., look at the credits again and see how the great character actress Kathleen Freeman is billed. Oh my!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! That was fast, Lively Gal! I'm thrilled to see you watched The Glass Wall and I loved that you shot from the hip, but with class. Terrific.

 

It was a wonderful vehicle for our glorious Double G., though. She tamped down her sexuality big-time allowing the audience to see that she?s more than just what we know she can be.

 

I completely agree. I thought this was a very appealing "Gloria Grahame" character.

 

It killed me to see her being in such a furtive survival mode... living in that squallid little rooming house...stealing coats and money from kids. (But when she ran INTO Central Park with the rep it would have, it made me say ?Yikes, you?re running in THERE??

 

I loved the dirty feel of her situation. How she was scraping to survive and that a guy looked to take advantage of her because of it.

 

Her acting out the description of the mundane tedious-ness of her job made me think, "Did you just learn mime at the Actors Studio??

 

:D

 

?The Glass Wall? is Vittorio Gassman's picture all the way

 

Definitely. And I really enjoyed his performance.

 

and it's also a message about the perils of trying immigrate to the United States...unlawfully. I usually suspend my disbelief in a New York minute with the movies; even the dastardly gets a break in my Maven's head. But something just kept gnawing in the back of my mind about the fact that he stowed away, that he was trying to circumvent the law. The U.S. is welcoming, if you come in the front door. The back door is another story.

 

Yeah, but the same can be said of the laws in Devil's Doorway and many other laws and former laws. The law is the law, right? We're to always accept them and never challenge them, right? Peter (Vittorio Gassman) actually has a legal way in, if only he can contact Tom (Jerry Paris). But he's being prevented from getting this opportunity. What to do? He chooses to flee. I don't blame the guy.

 

Remember, I'm not "black and white." I believe life is grey. I feel that if we view everything as "black and white," we lose our humanity.

 

And what a wild misleading trailer that was. Loved by three women?? I counted one...and a half).

 

I smiled at that one, too. :) The one gal didn't give a darn about him. The other two really liked him.

 

Desperation is the operative word here, a veritable ?Immigrant?s Excellent (Harrowing) Adventure.? He was like Alice in Wonderland meeting up with all these people in his quest to find Tommy and stay in America. The film also put me to mind a bit of ?They Live By Night.? Always running, never safe, always trying to stay one step ahead, but Cathy O'Donnell is certainly no Gloria Grahame.

 

Very nicely said. And I love this aspect of the film. He's a foreigner in the big city for the first time and he's really at the mercy of its inhabitants. How good are these people? Do they care about their fellow man? Can they trust this guy?

 

Sometimes Peter's exploits struck me as a little far-fetched, ?convenient? and that took me out of the pix in spurts.

 

Such as...

 

I liked that the officiousness of the Immigration cop changed once Peter?s story was corroborated. He was just following the rules, and maybe his hands were tied in the beginning. Loved the bemused look on the face of his partner as he listened to Peter?s (Gassman) story. But Peter was adorable and scared...and so very very desperate and I did feel that.

 

I really didn't have a problem with Inspector Bailey (Douglas Spencer). I understood he was just following orders. It would fall on him if he failed at his job. I get this. But I also feel for Peter, who has gone through hell and back and is looking for one lousy break. It's the same way I feel about the farmers vs the banks in The Grapes of Wrath. You just wish caring for your fellow man would enter the picture versus the cold-heartedness of rules and money. I know, I know. If you allow one to break a rule, you must allow them all.

 

Ironically, I just finished watching John Ford's The Hurricane, last night, and this entire dilemma was the film's focus. There are laws and then there are laws, if you will. And it was fascinating to see the law of man trumped by the law of nature. Do we ever bend or give? Are we to be nothing but book-followers?

 

Robin Raymond made me think of Constance Bennett. And her whole appearance in the film was quite a lesson in acceptance and assimilation. She is the daughter of immigrants. And though she does the bump-and-grind, she has two adorable little blonde haired kids that she has to feed, and allows a stranger to share their bed. (HUH?!)

 

I really loved that vignette. It reminded me so much of Clo-Clo (Margo) in The Leopard Man. Although, Clo-Clo's bad side was pretty bad. Still, when you see she's a mother who is also helping her own mother, you feel for the girl. (Love Lewton.) It's the same with Tanya (Robin Raymond). When you see what she's all about, it really humanizes her. And I loved her emotions in her scene.

 

glasswall11.jpg

 

glasswall12.jpg

 

When is a burlesque dancer ever called a "fine lady"? That would be like a guy calling Miss G "sweet." :P

 

Her son comes bustin? home all tough guy actor-y. (His performance had my head shaking). He is unequivocally American and wants nothing to do with the old language and culture.

 

Yet another important character, despite a very small amount of screen time. Does he think of anyone but himself? I sometimes wonder about the rest of us. Lots of "don't tread on me's" in our country. Such humility. It's as if we own everything.

 

Mom puts him in his place when she tells him "Don?t forget, your dead father was a lousy foreigner.? I loved the smack in the face she gave him.

 

A very important line and scene. And this is a small little film delivering this.

 

I would not classify this as film noir. But it could go under the umbrella of other films that talk of the Immigrant experience...and there's many of those.

 

So why doesn't it classify as a film noir?

 

P.S., look at the credits again and see how the great character actress Kathleen Freeman is billed. Oh my!!!

 

:D Wow! Nothing gets by you! I didn't catch that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought it interesting that when Gloria was in the same predicament Peter's adivce to her was "Crawl!....get on your belly and crawl."

 

I liked that moment. In a very interesting, strange way it connected those who were evading capture by military forces with criminals. Peter has lived the life of a "criminal." He was forced to.

 

glasswall14.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...