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GENERAL TRIVIA QUESTION THREAD

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In 1925, DeSylva became one third of the songwriting team with lyricist [Lew Brown|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lew_Brown|Lew Brown] and composer [Ray Henderson|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_Henderson|Ray Henderson], one of the top [Tin Pan Alley|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tin_Pan_Alley|Tin Pan Alley] [songwriters|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Songwriter|Songwriter] of the era. The writing and publishing partnership continued until 1930, producing a string of feel-good hits and the perennial Broadway favorite [Good News|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_News_(musical)|Good News (musical)]. The popularity of this team was so great that Gershwin's mother supposedly chided her sons for not being able to write the sort of hits turned out by the trio. The 1956 [Hollywood|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollywood|Hollywood] film [The Best Things in Life Are Free|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Best_Things_in_Life_Are_Free_(film)|The Best Things in Life Are Free (film)], starring [Gordon MacRae|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon_MacRae|Gordon MacRae], depicting the De Sylva, Brown and Henderson collaboration

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Your answer did not establish a close connection to any top composer. You are, however, sort of on the right track. I stated that you should focus on the early to mid '20s.

 

Edited by: finance on Nov 7, 2012 5:17 PM

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:The answer: Desylva, Brown, and Henderson were George Gershwin's primary lyricists in the early to mid '20s, before he started collaborating with his brother Ira.....Thread is open.

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A movie that was aired this past weekend on TBS brings up a question of the "moviestuff on the small screen" variety.

 

A 1980s M*A*S*H episode (won't waste time asking for guesses on that) focused on a plot about those jolly midicos finagling mightily to get a copy of a newly released movie so they could view it. Word-of-mouth on the new flick gave the impression that purient interest would be greatly aroused and satisfied.

The reels arrived and the eager viewers were severely disappointed.

 

What movie? Why the disappointment?

 

Edited by: flashback42 on Nov 12, 2012 9:22 PM

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Host Ben Mankiewicz outlined the history of the film's odd reception at the time of issue. There were censorship demands, not honored by the film's makers. Issued without the approval of the Code Enforcement types. Pans by the League of Decency types -- the Catholic Church among them. Banned by some local governments. Many of the major distributors refused to show it. Result: With all this ado going on, where it could be seen, crowds showed up.

 

In the M*A*S*H episode, **** Hawkye was the most avid seeker of enlightenment, and the most disappointed at the result.

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yep. The M*A*S*H episode The Moon Is Not Blue , aired 13 Dec 1982, related how the personel of the 4077th acquired a copy of the film in 1953, when it was new. Showed a brief sidewalk conversation in which Maggie McNamara revealed to William Holden that she was still a virgin. Imagine Hawkeye's letdown The TCM site for the film has a thorough synopsis.

 

BTW, have you ever known the term "professional virgin" to be used in any other context?

 

Sixes' thread

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*From Breaking News:*

 

Popular star, now deceased; support roles in some significant bigscreen films, TV star with a couple of series runs to his credit.

 

In one of his series roles, his character was often content to have his dessert consist of a Twinkie "with just a pinch of milk." A choice that would soon disappear if he were still around to ask for it.

 

Character? Actor?

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*Current Rumor and Innuendo on the Internet: Twinkies are being offered at $100 a box, and they may draw that.*

 

The sitcom character mentioned earlier -- His wife was amused at the way he expressed himself when he asked for his Twinkie. He bristled, called her "dingbat" and pointed out that when he didn't ask for his pinch of milk, he didn't get it.

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Noted. I guess my comment was too general...I had reference to the failure of the Hostess company, and the present flapdoodle about Twinkies in particular.

 

tomdestry's thread.

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The term "Rock and roll" was supposedly invented by Alan Freed. But it was used in songs prior to that. Name the earliest song which could be classified as rock and roll that used the expression.

 

Edited by: finance on Dec 5, 2012 5:10 PM

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No. I said it's got be classifiable as rock and roll------post-1950. Hint: There's a Jackie Wilson connection.

 

Edited by: finance on Dec 5, 2012 5:21 PM

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One problem I've run across in researching this is nobody can nail

down a specific song as 'the first rock-n-roll'. There seem to be a

small handful. I grew weary looking up lyrics and lost my train of

thought. But I'm ok. Nothing a fresh cantaloupe won't cure :P

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Mitch Miller? Give me a break.

 

 

The song was "Sixty Minute Man", which, aside from its suggestive lyrics( rock and roll was a euphemism for sex) is also among the several songs who various people consider to be the first rock and roll record. It was recorded in 1951 by Billy Ward and the Dominoes, of which Jackie Wilson was a one-time member.

 

 

Thread is open.

 

 

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Sorry, your browser either has JavaScript disabled or does not have any supported player.

You can [download the clip|http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a0/Guitar_Slim_-_The_Things_That_I_Used_to_Do.ogg] or [download a player|http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Extension:TimedMediaHandler/Client_download] to play the clip in your browser.

 

 

-----

{size:smaller}+Problems listening to this file? See [media help|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Media_help|Wikipedia:Media hel

 

 

Sorry, your browser either has JavaScript disabled or does not have any supported player.

You can [download the clip|http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/3a/Bill_Haley_and_His_Comets_-_Rock_Around_the_Clock.ogg] or [download a player|http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Extension:TimedMediaHandler/Client_download] to play the clip in your browser.

 

 

-----

 

Sorry, your browser either has JavaScript disabled or does not have any supported player.

You can [download the clip|http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b5/James_Cotton_-_Cotton_Crop_Blues.ogg] or [download a player|http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Extension:TimedMediaHandler/Client_download] to play the clip in your browser.

 

 

-----

 

Sorry, your browser either has JavaScript disabled or does not have any supported player.

You can [download the clip|http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/56/Thatsallright.ogg] or [download a player|http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Extension:TimedMediaHandler/Client_download] to play the clip in your browser.

[download a player|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Media_help|Wikipedia:Media help]

* ^[download a player|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-palmer-38]^^[download a player|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-83]^Regarding the "first Rock And Roll record", here's a quote from Wikipedia:

h2. "The first rock and roll record"

 

Even more than most other [musical genres|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_genres|Musical genres], rock and roll emerged gradually from many artists' work over a number of years, so any attempt to label a record as the first rock and roll song is an exercise in narrowing things down farther than they can reasonably be narrowed. According to musician and writer [billy Vera|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Vera|Billy Vera]:^[billy Vera|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-84]^

 

bq. "Rock 'n' roll was an evolutionary process – we just looked around and it was here.... To name any one record as the first would make any of us look a fool."

 

[Harry Hepcat|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Hepcat|Harry Hepcat], Rock historian and performer:

 

bq. "The first rock and roll record? First, try to define rock and roll. I thought it was that driving back beat, until I heard an Egyptian band that could give Bo Diddley lessons. The best I could do was to paraphrase Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart who, in 1964, said of obscenity that he knew it when he saw it. Rock and Roll? I know it when I hear it. The first time I heard that special something that was early rock and roll was upon hearing Fats Domino's 1949 recording of "The Fat Man." "

 

But that has not stopped many people from asserting one song or another as the first. These include:

 

* [sister Rosetta Tharpe|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sister_Rosetta_Tharpe|Sister Rosetta Tharpe]'s "[strange Things Happening Every Day|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strange_Things_Happening_Every_Day|Strange Things Happening Every Day]" (1944)^[[64]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-F._Wald.2C_2008-64]^

* "[Good Rockin' Tonight|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Rockin%27_Tonight|Good Rockin' Tonight]" by [Roy Brown|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Brown_%28blues_musician%29|Roy Brown (blues musician)] (1947), as covered by [Wynonie Harris|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wynonie_Harris|Wynonie Harris]^[[85]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-autogenerated3-85]^

* "[The Fat Man|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fat_Man_%28song%29|The Fat Man (song)]" by [Fats Domino|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fats_Domino|Fats Domino] (1949)

* [Goree Carter|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goree_Carter|Goree Carter]'s "[Rock Awhile|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Goree_Carter_-_Rock_Awhile.ogg|File:Goree Carter - Rock Awhile.ogg]" (1949) has been cited as a strong contender for the "first rock and roll record" title and a "much more appropriate candidate" than the more frequently cited "Rocket 88" (1951).^[[71]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-palmer19-71]^

* "[Rock the Joint|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_the_Joint|Rock the Joint]" by [Jimmy Preston|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jimmy_Preston|Jimmy Preston] (1949),^[[86]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-86]^ later covered by [bill Haley|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Haley|Bill Haley] (1952)

* "[Rocket 88|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocket_88|Rocket 88]" – either [Jackie Brenston|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackie_Brenston|Jackie Brenston]'s original, recorded on March 5, 1951 with [ike Turner|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ike_Turner|Ike Turner] and the Kings of Rhythm, or Bill Haley's cover, later in 1951

* "[Crazy Man, Crazy|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crazy_Man,_Crazy|Crazy Man, Crazy]" by Bill Haley & His Comets (1953)^[[87]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-87]^

* Bill Haley's "[Rock Around the Clock|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_Around_the_Clock|Rock Around the Clock]" (recorded on April 12, 1954)

* [Elvis Presley|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elvis_Presley|Elvis Presley]'s "[That's All Right|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/That%27s_All_Right|That's All Right]" (recorded in July 1954), a cover of [Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_%22Big_Boy%22_Crudup|Arthur ]'s 1946 song - which itself has been cited as "the first song to contain all of the elements... associated with rock and roll."^[[88]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-88]^ Some of the lyrics are [traditional blues verses|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traditional_blues_verses|Traditional blues verses] first recorded by [blind Lemon Jefferson|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blind_Lemon_Jefferson|Blind Lemon Jefferson] in 1926.^[[39]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-francisdavis-39]^

 

The 1992 book What Was the First Rock'n'Roll Record by [Jim Dawson|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Dawson|Jim Dawson] and Steve Propes^[[45]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-dawson_propes-45]^ discusses 50 contenders, from [illinois Jacquet|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illinois_Jacquet|Illinois Jacquet]'s "Blues, Part 2" (1944) to Elvis Presley's "[Heartbreak Hotel|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heartbreak_Hotel|Heartbreak Hotel]" (1956), without reaching a definitive conclusion. In their introduction, the authors claim that since the modern definition of rock 'n' roll was set by [disc jockey|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disc_jockey|Disc jockey] [Alan Freed|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Freed|Alan Freed]'s use of the term in his groundbreaking The Rock and Roll Show on New York's [WINS|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WINS_%28AM%29|WINS (AM)] in late 1954, as well as at his Rock and Roll Jubilee Balls at St. Nicholas Arena in January 1955, they chose to judge their candidates according to the music Freed spotlighted: R&B combos, black vocal groups, honking saxophonists, blues belters, and several white artists playing in the authentic R&B style ([bill Haley|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Haley|Bill Haley], [Elvis Presley|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elvis_Presley|Elvis Presley]). The artists who appeared at Freed's earliest shows included orchestra leader [buddy Johnson|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddy_Johnson|Buddy Johnson], the [Clovers|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovers|Clovers], [Fats Domino|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fats_Domino|Fats Domino], [big Joe Turner|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Joe_Turner|Big Joe Turner], the [Moonglows|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moonglows|Moonglows], [Clyde McPhatter|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clyde_McPhatter|Clyde McPhatter] and [the Drifters|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Drifters|The Drifters], and [the Harptones|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Harptones|The Harptones]. That, say Dawson and Propes, was the first music being called rock 'n' roll during that short time when the term caught on all over America. Because the honking tenor saxophone was the driving force at those shows and on many of the records Freed was playing, the authors began their list with a 1944 squealing and squawking live performance by [illinois Jacquet|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illinois_Jacquet|Illinois Jacquet] with [Jazz at the Philharmonic|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jazz_at_the_Philharmonic|Jazz at the Philharmonic] in Los Angeles in mid-1944. That record, "Blues, Part 2," was released as Stinson 6024 and is still in print as CD on the Verve label. Several notable jazz greats accompanied Jacquet on "Blues" including Paul Leslie and Slim Nadine (the monikers employed by Les Paul and Nat "King" Cole, respectively, in order to appear at the JATP concert incognito).

 

 

In 2004, Elvis Presley's "[That's All Right Mama|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/That%27s_All_Right_Mama|That's All Right Mama]" and Bill Haley's "[Rock Around the Clock|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_Around_the_Clock|Rock Around the Clock]" both celebrated their 50th anniversaries. [Rolling Stone Magazine|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolling_Stone_Magazine|Rolling Stone Magazine] felt that Presley's song was the first rock and roll recording.^[[89]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-89]^ At the time Presley recorded the song, Big Joe Turner's "[shake, Rattle & Roll|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shake,_Rattle_%26_Roll|Shake, Rattle & Roll]", later covered by Haley, was already at the top of the [ R&B charts|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_R%26B/Hip-Hop_Songs|Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs].^[[90]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-90]^ [The Guardian|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Guardian|The Guardian] felt that while there were rock'n'roll records before Presley's, his recording was the moment when all the strands came together in "perfect embodiment".^[[91]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-91]^ Presley himself is quoted as saying: "A lot of people seem to think I started this business, but rock 'n' roll was here a long time before I came along."^[[92]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-92]^

 

 

A leading contender as the first fully formed rock and roll recording is "[Rocket 88|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocket_88|Rocket 88]" by [Jackie Brenston|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackie_Brenston|Jackie Brenston] and his Delta Cats (which was, in fact, [ike Turner|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ike_Turner|Ike Turner] and his band The Kings of Rhythm recording under a different name), recorded by [sam Phillips|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Phillips|Sam Phillips] for his [Memphis Recording Service|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memphis_Recording_Service|Memphis Recording Service] in 1951 (the master tape being sold to and later released by [Chess Records|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_Records|Chess Records]).^[[45]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-dawson_propes-45]^^[[93]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-Campbell2008-93]^ Also formative in the sound of rock and roll were [Little Richard|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Richard|Little Richard] and [Chuck Berry|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chuck_Berry|Chuck Berry]. From the early 1950s,^[[94]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-whitep55-94]^ Little Richard combined gospel with [New Orleans|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Orleans|New Orleans] R&B, heavy backbeat,^[[95]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-95]^ pounding piano and wailing vocals.^[[96]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-96]^ [Ray Charles|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_Charles|Ray Charles] referred to Little Richard as being the artist that started a new kind of music, which was a funky style of rock n roll that he was performing onstage for a few years before appearing on record in 1955 as "[Tutti Frutti|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tutti_Frutti_%28song%29|Tutti Frutti (song)]."^[[97]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-white-97]^^[[98]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-rockhall.com-98]^^[[99]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-Campbell2008p168-99]^ Chuck Berry, with "[Maybellene|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maybellene|Maybellene]" (recorded on May 21, 1955, and which reached # 1 on the R&B chart and # 5 on the US pop chart), "[Roll over Beethoven|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roll_over_Beethoven|Roll over Beethoven]" (1956), "[Rock and Roll Music|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_and_Roll_Music|Rock and Roll Music]" (1957) and "[Johnny B. Goode|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_B._Goode|Johnny B. Goode]" (1958), refined and developed the major elements that made rock and roll distinctive, focusing on teen life and introducing guitar intros and lead breaks that would be a major influence on subsequent rock music.^[[99]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-Campbell2008p168-99]^ Early rock and roll used the [twelve-bar blues|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12-bar_blues|12-bar blues] chord progression and shared with boogie woogie the four beats (usually broken down into eight eighth-notes/quavers) to a bar. Rock and roll however has a greater emphasis on the [backbeat|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_%28music%29|Beat (music)] than boogie woogie.^[[100]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-100]^ [bo Diddley|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bo_Diddley|Bo Diddley]'s 1955 hit "[bo Diddley|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bo_Diddley_%28song%29|Bo Diddley (song)]", with its b-side "[i'm A Man|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27m_A_Man_%28Bo_Diddley_song%29|I'm A Man (Bo Diddley song)]", introduced a [new beat|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bo_Diddley_beat|Bo Diddley beat] and unique guitar style that inspired many artists without either side using the 12-bar pattern - they instead played variations on a single chord each.^[[101]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-101]^ His more insistent, driving rhythms, hard-edged [electric guitar|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_guitar|Electric guitar] sound, [African rhythms|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Africa|Music of Africa], and signature [clave|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clave_%28rhythm%29|Clave (rhythm)] beat (a simple, five-[accent|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accent_%28music%29|Accent (music)] rhythm), have remained cornerstones of rock and [pop|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pop_music|Pop music].^[[102]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-102]^^[[103]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-103]^^[[104]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-independent_bo-104]^

 

 

Others point out that performers like [Arthur Crudup|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Crudup|Arthur Crudup] and [Fats Domino|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fats_Domino|Fats Domino] were recording blues songs as early as 1946 that are indistinguishable from later rock and roll, and that these blues songs were based on themes, chord changes, and rhythms dating back decades before that.^[[105]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-105]^ [Wynonie Harris|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wynonie_Harris|Wynonie Harris]' 1947 cover of [Roy Brown|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Brown_%28blues_musician%29|Roy Brown (blues musician)]'s "[Good Rocking Tonight|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Rocking_Tonight|Good Rocking Tonight]" is also a claimant for the title of first rock and roll record, as the popularity of this record led to many answer songs, mostly by black artists, with the same rocking beat, during the late 40s and early 50s.^[[2]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-hoyhoy-2]^ [big Joe Turner|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Joe_Turner|Big Joe Turner]'s 1939 recording, "[Roll 'Em Pete|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roll_%27Em_Pete|Roll 'Em Pete]", is close to '50s rock and roll.^[[93]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-Campbell2008-93]^ [sister Rosetta Tharpe|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sister_Rosetta_Tharpe|Sister Rosetta Tharpe] was also recording shouting, stomping music in the 1930s and 1940s, such as "[strange Things Happening Every Day|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strange_Things_Happening_Every_Day|Strange Things Happening Every Day]" (1944), that in some ways contained major elements of mid-1950s rock and roll.^[[64]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-F._Wald.2C_2008-64]^ Pushing the date back even earlier, blues researcher [Gayle Dean Wardlow|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gayle_Dean_Wardlow|Gayle Dean Wardlow] has stated that "Crazy About My Baby" by [blind Roosevelt Graves|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blind_Roosevelt_Graves|Blind Roosevelt Graves] and his brother, recorded in 1929, "could be considered the first rock 'n' roll recording".^[[46]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-wardlow-46]^

 

 

Writer [Nick Tosches|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Tosches|Nick Tosches] stated:^[[5]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origins_of_rock_and_roll#cite_note-tosches_country-5]^

 

bq. "It is impossible to discern the first modern rock record, just as it is impossible to discern where blue becomes indigo in the spectrum."

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Well, this got a bit messy. I was looking for exact words

"rock-n-roll" or "rock and roll" in the lyrics, not "rock'em roll'em.


But anyway flash, were not looking for the first rock-n-roll song.

It's the first rock-n-roll song that used the expression. Which, BTW,

I don't consider "rock'em roll'em" to be. But I'm not sweating it.


It's like the TV show Family Feud. The answers are often not actual,

they're what the people polled had in mind.


P.S. mudskipper - I had 3" of scrolling left at the bottom my screen.

You'll have to do better next time :P

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