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FredCDobbs

How did you like "Trader Horn"?

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And were they "depictions" of native African women, or where they actual native African women (documentary)? I got the impression it was the latter, in which case that was mere "reality"... Don't we all love reality TV??? I'm sure no disrespect was intended; please give all the outrage a rest...

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Excellent movie, Fred. I really enjoyed along with The Mikado. These rare pictures are why I like TCM. The acting was a bit wooden but to see Africa as it was almost 80 years ago is priceless. The information about the animals was fairly accurate - they put hyenas lower on the food chain then we know they are now but the info about the lions, wild dogs, water buffalo and other animals was pretty good. According to IMDB the man attacked by the charging rhino was an actual image of a rhino killing a local boy - that's pretty brutal.

 

--

Terry Wallace

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> I wouldn't call them racial stereotypes<

 

From IMDb:

When Africans Mutia Omoolu and Riano Tindama were brought to Hollywood for re-shoots, they were refused admission to the Hollywood Hotel because they were black.

 

Now that's Racial....

 

 

vallo

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*"...they were refused admission to the Hollywood Hotel because they were black. Now that's Racial...."* - vallo13

 

I can't argue that it wasn't. Nor am I gonna try. Jim Crow laws are never defensible.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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>According to IMDB the man attacked by the charging rhino was an actual image of a rhino killing a local boy - that's pretty brutal.

 

Hi Terry,

 

The scene of the rhino running over a native was faked. It was a double exposure, probably a blue-screen matte shot. If you run the scene in slow motion, you?ll see that the shadow of the man falls toward the left of the screen and he is lit from the right, probably by artificial light, while the shadow for the rhino falls under him and slightly to the right and he is lit from the top left by the sun.

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>"...they were refused admission to the Hollywood Hotel because they were black. Now that's Racial...." - vallo13

 

>I can't argue that it wasn't. Nor am I gonna try. Jim Crow laws are never defensible.

 

I didn't see any Hollywood Hotel scenes in the movie. I must have missed that part.

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>>I didn't see any Hollywood Hotel scenes in the movie. I must have missed that part.

 

LOL, Didn't you know the movie was filmed in the Hollywood Hotels, Jungle Room?

 

 

vallo

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Well dang! They sure fooled me! Although I thought I occasionally saw the Hollywood Hills in the background of some of the scenes.

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Watching Trader Horn now. I see what was meant about the size of Renaldo's pith helmet. Also, why is he wearing a white tie all the time? Was that standard jungle garb back then?

 

So, I learned a giraffe has no vocal cords (unless Harry Carey was making that up).

 

Some of the background noise drowns out the dialogue.

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How did Edwina Booth manage to keep that outfit on? She was a very pretty lady, and the film finally picked up once she appeared. Her facial expressions at the outset, though, reminded me of "Fay Wray sees King Kong."

 

Was C. Aubrey Smith paid a dollar for his appearance?

 

Fred, can you explain why some scenes are in "fast motion," while others aren't? I notice this in so many movies of the early 30s .. like watching a silent film at times, the way they used to be shown on tv long ago.

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>Fred, can you explain why some scenes are in "fast motion," while others aren't? I notice this in so many movies of the early 30s .. like watching a silent film at times, the way they used to be shown on tv long ago.

 

Well, first, the cameras that shot the "fast" films were probably turning at 16 fps. Back in the early '30s, for many outdoor scenes, stock footage was used that had been shot in the '20s at 16 fps (such as a squad of police cars or fire trucks pulling out of their garages, you'll see those in sound gangster films from the early '30s). Also, some of the lighter weight cameras had only one speed, 16 fps, and were hand cranked. The mechanical speed governors inside them allowed for only that one speed. The scenes you are talking about are generally the "second unit" scenes. Also, there were probably some wind up hand-held cameras used during some of the scenes, and some of the ones made in the '20s had only one speed, 16 fps.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eyemo

 

I have one of these cameras, probably a 1950s version. It has several speeds with an adjustible governor. Can be spring driven, electric motor driven, or hand cranked. But under portable conditions they were usually spring driven.

 

I noiced that the director managed to rig up some kind of camera boom that went up and down in a few scenes.

 

I noticed that the first shooting of the Rhino (when the Rhino first fell) was shown twice, but from two separate camera positions. They probably had several cameras going during some of the action scenes. The main sound camera was most likely motor driven at 24 fps.

 

They used a type of glue to keep Edwina's top from showing any gaps. See the same thing in many "jungle girl" and "tropical island" type movies in the old days. The long hair of the wigs were sometimes glued to the breasts.

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http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/ca/EyemoMotorNikon.jpg

 

The large empty hole in the side of this camera is for the spring wind-up key, which has been removed in this picture. They also made a ratcheted hand crank for rapid winding. That worked something like a pump handle and looked like a rather large old-auto crank-start device. It was used when the camera was on a tripod to wind it up faster.

 

They also had a different kind of crank for hand cranking and actually running the camera, and that went in a different hole down at the bottom of the right side. In this photo, the motor-drive shaft is sticking into that slot and the electric motor drives the camera.

 

The hump on the back rear of the camera is a cap that goes over a slot onto which 400-foot film magazines can be inserted. Without the magazine the camera would take 100 feet of film, which lasted barely a minute.

 

The speed control on this camera is the dial up at the top rear. It can be set for 8 fps, 16 fps, and 24 fps. I think the ones made in the 1920s and early ?30s had only one speed and it was 16 fps. The dial at the top front is the footage meter, showing how much of a 100 foot roll of film remains.

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I found this movie to be fascinating. Glad it's still around. What footage.

Making that film had to be at least half the adventure of the story itself.

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I was simply mezmerized by the charging rhino; it struck me that I'd never seen a rhino charge -- just stand around looking miserable and bored in a zoo!!! These animals on the plains of Africa must have had what we often attribute to cats who are allowed outdoors today: a short life, but a merry one!!! Oh, and also mezmerized by that little outfit; I want one to wear for my boyfriend...

 

Now, to get to work on those grimaces...

 

As for the "fast motion," Fred, I don't know if your local PBS stations ever play that "One Man's Wilderness" -- a film made about and BY Dick Prennicke (sp?), but his "home movies" of his venture alone into the Alaskan wilds also feature this frankly comical "get up and go" walking...

 

Was shot in the 50s, I think; probably used the same camera?

 

This movie is a TREASURE; thank you again, TCM, for that pure delight -- and some cheap travel.

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I haven't seen that particular film you mentioned.

 

A lot of amateur film in the '50s was shot at 16 fps. In fact, I started shooting 8mm at 16 fps around 1956, but I soon switched over to 24 fps in case any of my films were ever blown up to 16 mm sound speed.

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"Was C. Aubrey Smith paid a dollar for his appearance?"

 

My understanding is that MGM used C. Aubrey Smith's character from Trader Horn to segue into Tarzan the Ape Man.

 

He operates the trading post in both pictures and, wuncha know, he has a daughter named Jane who surprises Dad with a visit and ultimately meets up with the white ape dude.

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This was new to me. I love that giant helmet the hero wore and his savage white jungle goddess. They don't make them like this any more. A film about the making of this movie on location would be fascinating.

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That's a possibility. I think they also used the theme music (what little there was) from Trader Horn in Tarzan movies.

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Thanks for the information, Thelma.

 

Here's a good place to find out the value of old books:

 

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchEntry?errorcode=1&ph=2

 

I've ordered old books from this company too. I like books mainly for their text and content. If I'm lucky, I can find beat up old cheap versions of rare books on that website. The most valuable copies are the clean neat ones, hard backs, with their dust jackets.

 

All my personal books have coffee stains on them, spaghetti spots, and chocolate cake smudges.

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