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The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

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*"So are you allowed to return to Paris?"* - FrankGrimes

 

Not from what I've read...

Minya008

(Click Through For Larger Version)

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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*Welcome back, Minya! What was your favorite thing about Paris??*

 

I wish I could pick just one thing! Everything was so unbelievable.

 

I was amazed at the way you're surrounded by history in this city-in a matter of a few Metro stops, you can see where Van Gogh lived and where Renoir stashed some of his mistresses. You can see the site of the beheading of Marie Antoinette (or get on the RER too see where she lived) and where so much of the insanity of the Revolution happened. In the basement level of the Louvre are the original fortress walls (it was where the kings lived until Versailles was built and became the main residence) that still make up part of the foundation (we were continually amazed and impressed at the way old buildings or walls were incorporated into new ones-or is it the new into the old-as a regular course of action. Something you don't see much in the States). You can walk a little way from there and see the museum where a set of Monet's water lilies that he painted towards the end of his life (as he was going blind) is displayed. It's housed in rooms of diffused light that bring out different aspects of the paintings as the light shifts, as he intended.

 

It's all so accessible! We just couldn't get over it. I could drone on for hours about all of it. :) If you've never been to Paris (everyone seems so well traveled, I can never remember who's been where :)) and the opportunity presents itself, by all means jump at it. You won't be sorry-none of the praise has been exaggerated.

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*Paris really is that magical and sublime. You would think that maybe it wouldn't measure up completely to the way people describe it but it really does.*

 

I couldn?t have said that better myself :). I?m glad you had a good time, but it?s Paris, how could you not? The Metro system is great and I remember reading in one of my guide books that they have the best coverage (most stops and such as that) of any city with a subway system so it?s no wonder you were able to see so much so easily.

 

If you?ll indulge me, I?ll share my favorite memory of the city of lights (if I've yammered on about this before just ignore me ;) ). I first went in ?97 as part of a study abroad trip to England (which was my first time outside the U.S.) and since we were in Canterbury, it was only a three hour train trip to Paris so a big group of us decided to go. I wasn?t all that excited at first b/c I was so enchanted with England but it seemed silly not to go with Paris so close. One of the professors on our trip was from France and he went with us to Paris. After we got off the train and were still in the station, we got on the Metro to go to our hotel. While we were riding along a man came by playing an accordion and the French professor leaned over to me and with a big smile said ?he?s playing that just for you?. Well, that did me in, and I was in love with Paris before I even really saw any of it :x.

 

The first dream I had about Gary Cooper (who is the birthday boy today) was about us being in Paris. We were a couple and were there on vacation and it was springtime and we were walking through one of the parks arm in arm and all the trees were blooming. It was beautiful. Dang it, now you got me wanting to go back! :)

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Minya - I loved your pics, and your description was perfect. I hope you are able to go back often and soon.

 

I arrived in Paris at night, and we ended up in the Place de la Concorde. It is the most beautiful thing I have ever seen .....all lit up and the fountains splashing like An American in Paris only REAL! This was the best way to arrive in Paris.

 

Every monument and building (and they are gorgeous) was lit up, and you can see everything just standing there. It was spectacular. Everything is so big and beautiful... the city is built for giants. Although you can see it all from one vantage point, to get to some of the major landmarks is another story. Because of the skewed perspective, things are actually farther away than you think. My favorite places were that museum you were talking about, and the cobblestone area at St Germain-des-Pres, which apparently has become tres chic since I've been there. Unfortunate, because I liked the bohemian quality that it exuded, with the Cafe Flore and other intellectual hangouts. It was charming.

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The Place de la Concorde is beautiful and what a great way to see it, all lit up. I only saw it during the day but I can imagine how beautiful it was at night :x.

 

I went with a pretty large group that first time (and a considerably smaller one the second in 2001 ? just me) and we broke off into little groups. Everybody wanted to take the boat ride down the Seine and I convinced our group to wait and go at night even though they were chomping at the bit to do it first thing. It was worth the wait. The Eiffel tower looked like it was made of solid gold the way they had it lit up. I think Minya posted a pic of it like that and it really is a sight to behold.

 

One other thing that stood out the most to me were the lights in the trees along the river. I?d never seen any like that before and haven?t since. A lot of the times when people light tress they wrap the lights around the branches and trunks to show the outline of the whole tree, but these were very discrete and just scattered in with the leaves. It literally looked like somebody took a handful of stars and dropped them on the trees. That was 12 years ago and I can still remember it vividly. Paris really is a special place.

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*After we got off the train and were still in the station, we got on the Metro to go to our hotel. While we were riding along a man came by playing an accordion and the French professor leaned over to me and with a big smile said ?he?s playing that just for you?. Well, that did me in, and I was in love with Paris before I even really saw any of it*

 

You couldn't have stated it any more perfectly!!! :) This was exactly how I felt, almost on arrival. We got to hear some wonderful music in the Metro. Mostly it was accordionists-which seemed so perfectly Parisian, but one afternoon we had the most wonderful treat when we passed a group of men playing and singing. The Metro has great acoustics and it was just one of the loveliest things I've ever heard. Our tour guide told us that the musicians that you see in the walkways to the platform all get licenses to play there, but if you just carry your accordion on the train (which happened quite a bit) you didn't have to get a formal okay.

 

Also, the men in Paris had the most wonderful charm, no matter the age. It seems to be something they're born with. :)

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*I arrived in Paris at night, and we ended up in the Place de la Concorde.*

 

I am so envious!! I can't inagine how great it would have been to come over that skyline at night!

 

*Because of the skewed perspective, things are actually farther away than you think.*

 

We learned this too! :) That day we went to the Louvre, we decided to walk back through the Tuileries to the Musee de l'Orangerie and then Place de la Concorde (that spot was amazing and eerie at the same time) before walking up the Champs-Elysees. About halfway up we were surpsrised to see how far away the L'Arc de Triomphe still looked. :)

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I think I could talk about Paris all day :). That is an excellent point about the men, they were very charming (not to mention quite handsome in some cases). When I was 14 I saw the Chateau Chenonceau on a tv show and dreamed of going there but never thought it would actually happen. Ten years later on the trip where I went by myself while in grad school in London, I finally got to see it. I took a train from Paris to another smaller town and then from there I was supposed to catch another train to the drop off point near the chateau (it was like a bus shelter type thing). I got to that first station in time for the train which was the only one going to the Chateau that day. Well, I got turned around trying to find it and was afraid I was gonna miss it. I went back to the ticket counter where only a couple of people were working, I told the man who was probably in his 30s that I just had to get there b/c I had wanted to see it for so long. Well, he left his post and walked with me to the train and then held my hand to help me get on. It was so sweet and he seemed to genuinely care that I made it.

 

After I spent the afternoon there, I went back to the where the train would pick me up and the cutest little gray haired man from the village came up to wait too. He started talking to me in French and I told him I didn?t speak it. He spoke English and we had a very pleasant conversation as we waited for the train.

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> We learned this too! :) That day we went to the Louvre, we decided to walk back through the Tuileries to the Musee de l'Orangerie and then Place de la Concorde (that spot was amazing and eerie at the same time) before walking up the Champs-Elysees. About halfway up we were surpsrised to see how far away the L'Arc de Triomphe still looked. :)

 

LOL! I've done that walk! You walk till you can't bear it anymore and look up, and you are right in the same spot you were in before.....

 

Tell us more about the Parisian men...... :)

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> {quote:title=gagman66 wrote:}{quote}

> Hey, you guys, DON'T FORGET THE BIG PARADE TONIGHT!!!!!

 

I just started recording it, though I won't be able to watch all of it tonight. Did you watch the intro with the special guest? What did you think?

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> Hmmmm...can torture be delicious? I mean, can this kind of torture be delicious?? Thanx for posting this, Ms. G.

 

I guess not for the object of the torture since he did NOT respond.... :P

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> > Hmmmm...can torture be delicious? I mean, can this kind of torture be delicious?? Thanx for posting this, Ms. G.

>

> I guess not for the object of the torture since he did NOT respond.... :P

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Why must you look to hurt me so? I've only treated you with loving kindness and this is how

you pay me back.

 

A week-long showing of In a Lonely Place followed by a Nick Ray film festival is true

torture for me.

 

I love the "Time Out" quote for In a Lonely Place:

 

"An achingly poetic meditation on pain, distrust, and loss of faith, not to mention an

admirably unglamouros portrait of Tinseltown."

 

The mention of "distrust and loss of faith" is what resonates most with me with

In a Lonely Place.

 

The films they selected for Ray are spectactular. The double features of They Live by Night

and Knock on Any Door and On Dangerous Ground and A Woman's Secret

are phenomenal! Stunning.

 

I love some of these quotes:

 

For On Dangerous Ground

 

?A high point of neurosis in Film Noir.?

? Anthony Lane, New Yorker

 

?One of the great, forgotten works of the genre. A remarkably pure film.?

? Fernando F. Croce, Slant

 

For They Live by Night

 

?The most romantic and haunting young-criminal-lovers-on-the-run movie ever made.?

? Jim Jarmusch

 

?Ray's remarkable 1949 debut, one of the many Hollywood precursors to Bonnie and Clyde, is an unusually pure representation of the doomed outlaw couple?perhaps the most romantic of all films noir.?

? J. Hoberman, The Village Voice

 

For Johnny Guitar

 

?It is dreamed, a fairy tale, a hallucinatory Western? the Beauty and the Beast of Westerns. The cowboys vanish and die with the grace of ballerinas. The bold, violent color contributes to the sense of strangeness; the hues are vivid, sometimes very beautiful, always unexpected.?

? Fran?ois Truffaut

 

And after reading the quotes, I REALLY need to see Bigger than Life.

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In a Lonely Place, On Dangerous Ground and A Woman's Secret are probably the ones I'll try hardest to see. I'm most excited about On Dangerous Ground because it's one of my all-time favorites. I have the feeling these shows will sell out.

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In a Lonely Place, On Dangerous Ground and A Woman's Secret are probably the ones

I'll try hardest to see.

 

A Woman's Secret? Really? That surprises me.

 

I'm most excited about On Dangerous Ground because it's one of my all-time favorites.

 

Of all the films being shown, that's definitely the one I know you like. That's yet another

Ray romance. Film noir and romance... UNIQUE! :P

 

I have the feeling these shows will sell out.

 

Really? That would be terrific. But I can't see In a Lonely Place selling out every

showing.

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