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The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread


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Exactly. that's the texture of living that nothing can recapture.

 

I'm reminded of those "reality" shows that were on not too long ago, where a group of people (or families) had to live in a specific old time period and recreate all the details of life back in that time and place. Well, it not only pointed up the obvious, but I wonder if anyone thinks about how there's just no way you can recreate the place inside people that originated every daily task and custom and word. It doesn't come from the same place as with people in another time, before or after.

 

Even people looking back and remembering, color their recollections. They can never bring it back, in its full reality.

 

Dan O'Flaherty (Noel Purcell) stands out from his townfolk not just because of the position he takes and his stubborn old fashionedness, but because he bemoans not just the ways that are gone, but the commonly held feelings that people had which created those ways. It's not enough to have a community, but why you need and value it can make all the difference. He came from a time when everyone really depended on each other for all their laws, customs, favors, conflicts, entertainment...life. The world was moving away from that and on to greater self sufficiency, I guess.

 

Ha, that made me think of one of the most "un-Fordian" of Ford's films, which has one of the best and most appropriate of all his movie titles: The World Moves On.

 

Edited by: MissGoddess on Nov 16, 2011 11:06 PM

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The World Moves On

 

 

Which I still haven't seen! Wow, I think I am the one everyone should be calling shiftless! I am very slow, and sometimes I don't even want to see all the movies by a particular person, because then, I'll have nothing to look forward to... it's crazy I know. I'm as stubborn as old Dan.

 

I think I did see it listed on Netflix recently... and I added it to my queue so at least there is a good chance I'll get to it one of these days.... maybe Friday. :D

 

>Dan O'Flaherty (Noel Purcell) stands out from his townfolk not just because of the position he takes and his stubborn old fashionedness, but because he bemoans not just the ways that are gone, but the commonly held feelings that people had which created those ways. It's not enough to have a community, but why you need and value it can make all the difference. He came from a time when everyone really depended on each other for all their laws, customs, favors, conflicts, entertainment...life. The world was moving away from that and on to greater self sufficiency, I guess.

 

If we get any more progressive or self sufficient, we'll all be living in little holes, by ourselves, with only the warmth of the computer to see and remember.

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> The world was moving away from that and on to greater self sufficiency, I guess.

 

> If we get any more progressive or self sufficient, we'll all be living in little holes, by ourselves, with only the warmth of the computer to see and remember.

 

And we'll have only one finger to tap and a thumb to swipe! Playing with the virtual doggies and virutal kittens. :)

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I do love The Rising of the Moon (thanks MissG), partly because I really like anthology movies. The short story format of movies like Dead of Night and Trio, or O. Henry's Full House really captivates me. I also like bookish, literary movies a lot. I like the way the short story movie keeps ones interest by switching things up, and how the stories can interrelate to make a satisfying whole.

 

Hi there JackaaaAaay. So you got out from under that dustmop (hope all is **** 'n Span) to present the Message Board with another fine critique. I like anthology movies myself. It's like getting a bunch of mini-movies for the price of one. But here again lies the difference between us, l'il sis. You're eclectic...naming lofty movies, and my first response reveals my bargain basement tastes: "Awww yeah man, 'Dr. Terror's House of Horrors.' Whooppeeee!" It was a very undignified jump for joy on my part. When will I ever learn!

 

I've never seen the movie you described, but I just wanted to tell you it was a very lovely critique; supported by some stunning screen caps. You made me think of that great review you wrote for von Sternberg's "Shanghai Express."

 

If we get any more progressive or self sufficient, we'll all be living in little holes, by ourselves, with only the warmth of the computer to see and remember.

 

Well that will give new meaning to "No man is an island."

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THE UNIQUE, THE MARVELOUS and THE EXCEPTIONAL: and I don't mean my post. ( Ha!! )

 

I continue to marvel at this topsy turvyness! I really am surprised that 'The Constant Nymph' resonated so well with you when you had reservations about it, and it didn't really grab me as much even though I was hoping to love it, especially given that 'Letter From an Unknown Woman' is such a personal favorite and it has a similar theme.

 

Ha. I can't explain it myself. Just call me "Tall T 'n T. (Topsy Turvy). Not only is the topsy turvyness between you and me, but it is also within myself. I tell ya, I was a wreck when I walked out of that movie theatre when all I wanted to do when I went into the theatre was get this movie under my belt. Maybe I'll change when I see it again, from stem to stern. I only saw the last half-hour of TCM's recent airing. But I now have a DVD of it and can give my heart another spin around the block and see if I still feel the same.

 

I don't dislike 'The Constant Nymph' and I may come to appreciate it more over time. I do appreciate all the discussion here and at the SSO and how it has made me look at the movie from different angles.

 

...You may never come to like this film more. And that'll be okay. Your willingness to take other opinions into account, and revisit the film...that's a good thing.

 

You really should, since star and theme are so similar and when you add Ophuls....

 

Ophuls' style is starting to interest me after seeing "The Earrings of Madame de..." and listening to your boy give that commentary (I've forgotten his name) on HOW to look at Ophuls. Ophuls farely blew my mind with his presentation. I...felt...Madame de's Love, thanx to Max's dizzying presentation.

 

This is very often true. I guess I was thinking that 'The Constant Nymph' is presenting us with a unique event or happening, not trying to say that this is in any way the common experience. That places the story in the 'romance' territory for me, which is where the ideal fits...

 

I hear ya. And I agree with you in what you surmise Movies do (or at least did) back then, which was not to really present what was the common everyday experience but to present the Experience of Possibility; the Romance of things. Movies' vision used to be sort of a 'our reach should exceed our grasp' kind of blanket over everything. Your entire paragraph on your position was wonderfully expressed 'G.' I cannot possibly hope to match how you wrote it, other than to say I understand what you mean...and agree with what you say. I did start off my post saying that I totally bought Tessa's & Lewis' affection for each other.

 

And that's where I kind of wondered if Charles Boyer's character really could have been satisfied with Joan. He's French, after all! :P

 

Ha! You have a point there...him being French and all. The Alexis Smith-model would surely and most likely be chosen over the little girl model.

 

We are all corporeal carnal beings.

 

With spiritual needs.

 

For some, true 'dat. True 'dat.

 

Men sublimate their desire? Yeah, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than...

 

Touche. :D And yet, "man cannot live on bread alone..."

 

Ah-ha!! Bravo!! ;-)

 

I believe Tessa loved Lewis as much as a fourteen year old girl psychologically can love...

 

I agree with you in the main, there. I also believe in the exceptions to that, and maybe that is what the story was concerned with, our discussion notwithstanding.

 

Exceptions. Okay. Yes, I hear you. Exceptions, not the common every day experience. You're talking about the spirit in which things are presented: the Romance School. And I can believe that this story was about the Exception to the psychological Rule of Thumb. It was more the "It Could Happen." The, it could happen, that this 14 year old girl (an old soul) felt love; felt Love as deeply as a Woman would, even at her tender age...felt Love in the way a grown up might define being in Love.

 

THE 'V' WORD: Or...as Oscar Levant was attributed to saying: "I knew Doris Day before she was a virgin..."

 

And if I can butt in, and hopefully add something of value in response to you comment to Frank about the V-word... ( :D )

 

Aaaah yes, the "V" word...the hornet's nest I rustled. Or was that a land mine I just stepped on? :P ("HEY!! Where's the rest of me?!!")

 

Allow me to backtrack, just a bit, to your exchange with one, Frank Grimes, Frozen Rope Recipient and Grey Man Extraordinaire, to be sure I understood the context you both were speaking in, and you'll understand what I meant by what I said. Forgive me for paraphrasing horribly...but hopefully accurately:

 

MS. G.: Is Lewis' real love only inspired by Alexis Smith who stirred him physically?

 

MR. G.: Could a grown man even be in love with a 14-year old girl?

 

You two were speaking in context of the movie, and I might've mixed in my thoughts on Real Life Reality. My response was based on the reaal world, not the Romantic world of the Possibility, of the Exception (in this case of Tessa & Lewis) that you guys were talking about. My reply was (based on the real-world) a 14-year old is not psychologically equipped to handle a grown man's love even if he might (but shouldn't) be in love with her. I was not speaking of the world of the Fantastic, The Romantic when I went on to say, as a bit of an aside and an unfortunate swipe, that I was not crazy about cultures who would value Virginity as a way of not having their "performance" judged or compared to. If a person chooses to uphold the "V" word...fine. It is their choice. (I want it to be their choice). I just meant that to create a whole system of values lauding it, smacked a bit to me to me like protecting the male ego. I was not looking to castigate a woman (or man's) choice in that regard. And you aptly pointed out to me that a whole system of values lauding Virginity does not necessarily have to do with any of what I said.

 

I'd just say that not everyone who values virginity does so because of cultural expectations or pressures. It sometimes can be a conscious choice after careful consideration of all sides of the matter. Especially in western cultures, where it's no longer valued or encouraged, but rather has become a pejorative and a source of mockery so choosing virginity for a young person is kind of rare and takes incredible courage.

 

You're right. It's not just cultural expectations or pressures. I made a blanket state and you really laid out the other side of the coin (and all the facets of a prism) as to why virginity is chosen: (health, respect, responsibility et al).

 

That's just to clarify that the idea of holding onto your virginity isn't always a product of backwards, irrational or unsophisticated non-thinking male chauvinists. :D

 

Yes ma?am.

 

Fair and equitable. Looking at all sides of a situation. And then the Peacemaker came riding in. (That'd be you Ro-Ro. Look out everybody!! Woohoo!! :D ) And you extolled the value, and gift that it is. You let it be known that "passion" and "love" are ofttimes confused and how sad it is that a lot of media browbeat kids who choose to remain virgins.

 

ROHANAKA: But PS: Miss Maven.. having said ALL of that.. I do concede your point (if I am reading your intent correctly) about how some cultures seem to have a double standard regarding the role of men and the role of women and the value of the "v" word.. and it being used as a "prize" or reward" for a man to show his worth in society...

 

Yes you understood my intent.

 

Soap box ladies? Nahhhh. You?re just being fair, shedding light and giving your thoughts on the matter that I might have been a bit cavalier and off-hand about. May I really confess, Miss G., that I laughed when you wrote: "Do it soon! Do it often! Do it online!" I just thought of the marketing possibilities and I chuckled. Sorry.

 

I had to say it because it's tough on kids who make that choice willingly and with knowledge, but are harassed and made fun of for it, often by adults as well as peer pressure.

 

That's got to be pretty tough indeed, poor kids.

 

Now if you think that's tough...who will speak up for that much more severely maligned group:

 

The Celibate Adult???

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A Hitch good evening to you, Lively Gal --

 

And a very very lovely Grace Kelly evening to you, Grimesy Me Boy.

 

I like how you use pictures in your posts. It's wonderfully done.

 

Thank you very much.

 

Wow guys. I spotted a film on both your lists that so resonated with me on a great emotional level, but ranked so low with you two, that I felt compelled to reply to your conversation with my own thoughts and take on that film.

 

Terrific! That's what I wish for! And I watched 'The Constant Nymph' film because you suggested it to me.

 

Ohhhh no. Now do I feel bad. I recommended it, and you didn't care for it. :-( See, that's why I never play your "how would YOU rank I like this film?" game. I'd be no good!

 

I completely agree. Such crushes even happen within a family. I had a crush on my mom's cousin. I can tell a young girl in my family has a crush on me. The crushes are completely one-sided.

 

Yeah, exquisite torture, Lewis.

 

I still wonder about Lewis' love of Tessa and their entire relationship. I feel as if Lewis is being worshiped by Tessa and Lewis is looking after her like a father would do with a daughter. His worry over her feels like a parental worry, not a spousal worry.

 

Mmm hmmm...I get that. The hero worship. (Boyer is dashing and rather unattainable except through Music). The parental worry. I see. I'm still holding on to it developed into something more the older she got.

 

I'm glad you let your emotions lead you.

 

I totally lead with my heart.

 

I've been avoiding it like the plague! But I'm actually open to watching it. I do know it's a favorite of yours. You like catty!

 

Meow! But I like big grown up themes too. Sort of. No wait, I do. I do.

 

I usually like Joan because I like girls who are shy and fearful and I feel she plays this the best. In this film, she's actually the opposite of what I'm used to with Joan. She's full of life and very expressive.

 

Yes. I wonder what you'll think of Joan Fontaine in "The Women." Oh wait...what am I saying? You're avoiding it like the plague. Ohhhkay. I'm not suggesting it, recommending it or hinting you watch it. Don't see it! I'd feel responsible for a miserable two hours you can never get back. Say, why do you like shy and fearful girls? You mean as characters in movies, right?

 

I have a question for you Grimesy...you mention that "The Constant Nymph" is 'a little girl film.' Are you using that term b'cuz the film was from the p.o.v. of the young girl or in the same sense when folks talk about "women's films" and "men's films"?

 

It's the P.O.V. that I'm referring to. But I also believe that if you've been a little girl, you're going to connect with 'The Constant Nymph' more so than someone who hasn't been. The feelings of a girl are being presented.

 

I see. Okay. Thanx.

 

I'd say the comparison of the two films is very good and apt. And I would say 'Sweet Smell of Success' is male 'catty.' Since I'm a guy, I enjoy the male 'catty' to the female 'catty.'

 

I gotcha.

 

The idea of love is always perfect. All of your hopes and dreams are painted with all the right strokes since it is you who is doing the painting. Enter the object of your love and affection, and that changes things. They cannot be controlled. Now there are two people holding the brush. How we see a person is never how they really are.

 

WoW. You just now made me think of Scottie Ferguson in "VERTIGO." He brushed Judy into Madeleine. He almost made it with the control thing, didn?t he? But Karmic justice took over. (Didn't John Lennon say: "Instant karma's gonna get you..." )

 

Yes, first love is shown and then it becomes much more complex, from then on out. There is more depth found in 'Letter from an Unknown Woman.'

 

What? Et tu Brutus? What's with this "Letter from an Unknown Woman"[/b]???

 

I'm not religious, so my opinion on the topic is purely my own.

 

Can a person be spiritual and not religious? Do you believe 'religious' and 'spiritual' are two separate entities, or mutually exclusive?

 

My philosophy has always been, if you're going to sleep with someone outside of marriage, you better truly love that person because of the consequences. Because if a child comes about, it's no longer about you, it's about your child. Their best interests come first. And I believe a child is better off with parents who love each other.

 

Sometimes some people don't sleep with people they truly love. (If you love 'em, that's great...that?s nice). For some people, being in love does not have to be a pre-requisite for sleeping with them. (I'm skirting and skating and slipping and sliding and minding my p's and q's around another possible hornet's nest...so let me tread very carefully). IMHO, I believe consequences can be avoided... prevented...even before the hot and the heavy begin, to ensure no child comes out of any union. And I agree, that once the child IS here...well, hey...the kid didn't ask to be here... it is better for the parents to love or at the very least, respect each other.

 

What's wrong with today's world is that sex has become selfish and too many children are being born out of that selfishness. You want a child to be born out of love, not just sex.

 

Yes!!

 

They say, men use love to get sex, and women use sex to get love. But I'm not sure who "They" is. I just know "They" get quoted a lot. Don't sue me.

 

I don't think there was any chance of another man entering her (Tessa's) life where she was in life. I don't think she "saw" any other guy.

 

You know, you're right...

 

Everybody has their "too much." I tend to be more bothered by the bombastic in dramas. I don't like it when music is pushing hard on me on how to feel.

 

I hear you. Killing me softly.

 

Chemistry. And I'm horrible with science!

 

Hmmm...why don't I believe that Monsieur Pasteur?

 

MOVIEMAN1957: "The Constant Nymph" was not a big deal for me. It's nice they got it out of its rights problems but it was only okay.

 

FRANK GRIMES: Yeah, I can't see that one being to your liking. I wasn't moved by it much, either. I wanted to be.

 

Welllll... whaddya expect; it was a woman's film.

 

Exactly!

 

D?OH!!!! What a catty thing to say. :P

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Hello, Festival Maven! :)

 

> Ha. I can't explain it myself. Just call me *"Tall T 'n T.* (Topsy Turvy). Not only is the topsy turvyness between you and me, but it is also within myself. I tell ya, I was a wreck when I walked out of that movie theatre when all I wanted to do when I went into the theatre was get this movie under my belt.

 

That's great, though. Sometimes it can be a bonus to have lower expectations. It's worse to be all excited about seeing a movie only for it to be a big let-down.

 

I also think there's some wonderful, mysterious alchemy about watching a movies, especially a classic, in a theater with an audience. Maybe it is more immersive, you really lose yourself in the experience and feed off of the energy of the people around you feeling the same thing. Who knows? Maybe if I saw *The Constant Nymph* in a theater, all that music might suddenly have seemed perfection. And I do mean that. These films were never intended for TV viewing.

 

> Maybe I'll change when I see it again, from stem to stern. I only saw the last half-hour of TCM's recent airing. But I now have a DVD of it and can give my heart another spin around the block and see if I still feel the same.

>

 

I'm sure you'll still like it, and I'm curious as to how you will compare it to *Letter from an Uknown Woman*, which you're probably sick to death of hearing about already, ha!! And that one probably won't measure up to TCN (or even Earrings...) but I hope it will be an interesting experience, especially now you've seen TCN which is so similar.

 

> ...You may never come to like this film more. And that'll be okay. Your willingness to take other opinions into account, and revisit the film...that's a good thing.

>

 

THat's the addictive pleasure of these discussions, I get so much more out of ALL the movies we watch and talk over, whether they are personal favorites of mine, or of someone else. It's not all about me, me, me. I want to know why others like what they do so much.

 

> Ophuls' style is starting to interest me after seeing *"The Earrings of Madame de..."* and listening to your boy give that commentary (I've forgotten his name) on HOW to look at Ophuls. Ophuls farely blew my mind with his presentation. I...felt...Madame de's Love, thanx to Max's dizzying presentation.

>

 

"Dizzying" is a great word for it! All that whirling around like a waltz.

 

> I hear ya. And I agree with you in what you surmise Movies do (or at least did) back then, which was not to really present what was the common everyday experience but to present the Experience of Possibility; the Romance of things. Movies' vision used to be sort of a 'our reach should exceed our grasp' kind of blanket over everything. Your entire paragraph on your position was wonderfully expressed 'G.' I cannot possibly hope to match how you wrote it, other than to say I understand what you mean...and agree with what you say. I did start off my post saying that I totally bought Tessa's & Lewis' affection for each other.

>

 

Thanks, very much. :) I don't think I was very clear, but thank you.

 

 

> The, it could happen, that this 14 year old girl (an old soul) felt love; felt Love as deeply as a Woman would, even at her tender age...felt Love in the way a grown up might define being in Love.

>

 

I liked what you said, "old soul". That's the part I identified with Tessa (and with Lisa, in Letter....).

 

> Aaaah yes, the "V" word...the hornet's nest I rustled. Or was that a land mine I just stepped on? :P ("HEY!! Where's the rest of me?!!")

>

 

No! :D You simply prompted a neat segue onto admittedly oh wow, dare I say it? Virgin territory? :P

 

> Allow me to backtrack, just a bit, to your exchange with one, Frank Grimes, Frozen Rope Recipient and Grey Man Extraordinaire, to be sure I understood the context you both were speaking in, and you'll understand what I meant by what I said. Forgive me for paraphrasing horribly...but hopefully accurately:

>

> *MS. G.: Is Lewis' real love only inspired by Alexis Smith who stirred him physically?*

>

> * MR. G.: Could a grown man even be in love with a 14-year old girl?*

>

> You two were speaking in context of the movie, and I might've mixed in my thoughts on Real Life Reality. My response was based on the reaal world, not the Romantic world of the Possibility, of the Exception (in this case of Tessa & Lewis) that you guys were talking about. My reply was (based on the real-world) a 14-year old is not psychologically equipped to handle a grown man's love even if he might (but shouldn't) be in love with her. I was not speaking of the world of the Fantastic, The Romantic when I went on to say, as a bit of an aside and an unfortunate swipe, that I was not crazy about cultures who would value Virginity as a way of not having their "performance" judged or compared to. If a person chooses to uphold the "V" word...fine. It is their choice. (I want it to be their choice). I just meant that to create a whole system of values lauding it, smacked a bit to me to me like protecting the male ego. I was not looking to castigate a woman (or man's) choice in that regard. And you aptly pointed out to me that a whole system of values lauding Virginity does not necessarily have to do with *any* of what I said.

>

 

And I do understand that even better now and can completely see why and where you're coming from with that. Because it often is (or was) unfairly one-sided.

 

> May I really confess, Miss G., that I laughed when you wrote: *"Do it soon! Do it often! Do it online!"* I just thought of the marketing possibilities and I chuckled. Sorry.

>

 

Ha haaa! I'm glad you did laugh because I wasn't sure if my pathetic attempt at humor fell flat or not.

 

 

> Now if you think that's tough...who will speak up for that much more severely maligned group:

>

> The Celibate Adult???

 

In the immortal words of whosits: You said it.

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*Dutch white boy wrote:*

*I'm blocking all of Sweet T's pics!*

HEY! Im right here for pete's sake! You better watch it or i'll get greer to throw some rocks at you...she wasn't afraid of doing it to gable! :D



*Jackie wrote:*

*Scotchie, I love that photo you tried to post. I wish I could help figure out why it isn't working.*

*I'm sure Frank loves it too. :D*

I know. it's driving me batty. hmm.. maybe i shouldn't admit that with ol' dutch boy hanging around in the distance. heehee!








Edited by: butterscotchgreer on Nov 17, 2011 10:41 PM
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Ms Favell, Thank you for your lovely post on The Rising of the Moon. Way cool!

 

But oh me..Wait a minute.. HOLD the phone.. PS: Grey Dude.. I owe you an apology. (duh) I totally MISSED one of the titles on you latest "recently watched" list. (and it took dear JACKIE and her way cool post on T R of the M to jog my memory.) I HAVE seen that one too (so I guess that makes three of your list I haev seen, along w/ FP and TBS) But oh me.. it is not too fresh in my mind (and evidently I had completly forgotton the title too asI only saw TROTM just once when it aired some time ago on TCM w/ some of Ford's other films) So add that all together with the fact that I have not had time to read through all the posts that were made between everyone and all the stuff that may or may not have been mentioned about your latest list yet) and you get: ME totally forgetting that I had seen that one (did I mention.. "duh"???) :D But goodness me, I wish I remembered more about the whole thing, because even if I can't recall all the details, I just recall really liking it a lot. The one w/ the train station stands out most in my memory for riht now, but I can't say for sure w/ out seeing it all again, which one I liked the very best. But truly, I think it could have been any of them. All the stories collected together were like little "moments" in time, each one a gem all its own.

 

And Ms Favell, may I just say again.. way cool. I am going to look back over your post more closely, dear girl,(and get a good glimpse at those lovely caps again too, darlin') and then I'll also try to read back a few more pages to see what else may have been said on this film if only so I can refresh my memory on the whole lot Thanks for jogging the old memory for me, kiddo. At my advanced age and with my present mental capacity (or lack thereof.. ha) I need all the help I can get! :D

 

PS: Miss Maven:

 

And then the Peacemaker came riding in. (That'd be you Ro-Ro. Look out everybody

 

More like "blabbing" in.. but what else is new??? ha. Thanks for putting up w/ me, little darlin'. :D

 

(Ps some more.. hold that phone again Grey Guy.. ugh.. I am editing my post because I meant to say (above) that The Rising of the Moon meant I had see FOUR of the films on your list (not three) having also seen The Rains Came (along w/ TBS and FP)

 

Good gravy we just blabbed a bit on that one the other day! Now I am getting so bad, I can't even remember what I just talked about a few days ago. This is reminding me of a tshirt my dad used to have that said.. "When your memory goes.. forget it!"

 

(Oh wait.. was it a tshirt.. or a hat???? AAAGGGHHHH!)

 

Edited by: rohanaka on Nov 18, 2011 12:54 AM

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You're so welcome. It's a fine line between helping you and upseting Sir Francis but I took a chance. (He and I did have a coule of good lines though.)

 

All I did was copy the url and put an exclamation point at the beginning and the end. (I'm sure you know but just in case.)

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_T&T -_

 

> Hi there Jackaaa*A*aay. So you got out from under that dustmop (hope all is **** 'n Span) to present the Message Board with another fine critique. I like anthology movies myself. It's like getting a bunch of mini-movies for the price of one. But here again lies the difference between us, l'il sis. You're eclectic...naming lofty movies, and my first response reveals my bargain basement tastes: "Awww yeah man, *'Dr. Terror's House of Horrors.' *Whooppeeee!" It was a very undignified jump for joy on my part. When will I ever learn!

 

HA! You made me laugh hard here! But then I thought, "How can I get myself a copy of *Dr. Terror's House of Horrors?"* :D

 

And yes, I still have a bunch of stuff to do to get ready for the big sleepover, but time is loosening up a little now. Plus, I made myself happy by cleaning up all the little piles of stuff that clutter every corner of my house. Or at least, I moved them around.

 

> I've never seen the movie you described, but I just wanted to tell you it was a very lovely critique; supported by some stunning screen caps. You made me think of that great review you wrote for von Sternberg's *"Shanghai Express."*

 

Thanks. It helps when I really love a movie - that's when I can't stop thinking about it, and the words come more easily if I've got a semblance of what I want to say in my head already.

 

_Ro-Ro -_

 

I'm glad I could jog your memory! I know just how you feel! I have such a bad memory, even sometimes for movies I like!

 

I especially was thinking of this with the mention of *The Earrings of Madame de.....* It's a movie I really loved, but I can't for the life of me bring it up to memory, except in the most simplistic terms. Some movies are not really about anything SOLID (you can't say, "and then this happened" or describe them), and so their effects are a bit ephemeral, we remember their tone, or the way they made us feel, but not necessarily what it was that made us love them , or why. They are all about emotion, which is a much harder thing to write about or to explain. They can be some of the most beautiful and satisfying films to experience, and yet, to get them down in a concrete way is sometimes very difficult.

 

Or maybe it's just my addled brain..... :D

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Ahhh yes, "The Big Sleep(Over)." That should be fun. Has your little one decided what the itinerary will be...with your help? Are any movies on the menu? You're going to have a bunch of little Tessas and Lisas over your house. Giggling little tiny pre-women; stirring memories of being a little girl. Sounds fun...and just a little tiring with all your preparation.

 

Your daughter'll probably want you to disappear (who wants a grown-up around). Maybe you can watch a movie yourself during their get-together.

 

 

Listen, I think you need to revisit *"...Madame de...".* It'd be cheaper to mail it back than to buy it in the first place....

 

 

I hope the sleepover is a rousing success!!

 

Just don't show 'em any Kirk Douglas movies and have that reported back to their folks. :P

 

CineMaverick

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}Ahhh yes, "The Big Sleep(Over)." That should be fun. Has your little one decided what the itinerary will be...with your help? Are any movies on the menu? You're going to have a bunch of little Tessas and Lisas over your house. Giggling little tiny pre-women; stirring memories of being a little girl. Sounds fun...and just a little tiring with all your preparation.

 

I think they are going to watch *Balls of Fury*. I've never seen it, but if it's like *Dodgeball*, it's OK. My daughter's best friend has it over at their house and they thought it was a riot. I hope I don't get calls from angry parents.

 

> Your daughter'll probably want you to disappear (who wants a grown-up around). Maybe you can watch a movie yourself during their get-together.

 

Yes, she wants me to disappear, so I will be watching Richard Todd tonight. Yay! We don't have a dvd upstairs, so I can't pick and choose my movies, but TCM is always good watching.

 

> Listen, I think you need to revisit *"...Madame de...".* It'd be cheaper to mail it back than to buy it in the first place....

 

Gosh, I KNOW I have to revisit it! I really loved it when I watched it the first time. Ophuls is so great! I also need to get *Letter from an Unknown Woman.* I've only seen the very beginning, with Joan lurking and then running upstairs, in one sweeping fluid motion.

 

> I hope the sleepover is a rousing success!!

>

>

> Just don't show 'em any Kirk Douglas movies and have that reported back to their folks. :P

 

No fear of Kirk movies showing up in my house! :D

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Gosh, I KNOW I have to revisit it! I really loved it when I watched it the first time. Ophuls is so great! I also need to get Letter from an Unknown Woman. I've only seen the very beginning, with Joan lurking and then running upstairs, in one sweeping fluid motion.

 

Oh Maxie. I'm starting to love him. His movies seem to be about Love. What is Love, what it is TO Love. I'll get you Ophul'ed, Jaxxon. Why don't you start with this:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hY1tSfCTEeI&NR=1

 

And next week, I'll lend you my earrings.

 

No fear of Kirk movies showing up in my house! :D

 

I know. D'Oh!!!

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You're so welcome. It's a fine line between helping you and upseting Sir Francis but I took a chance. (He and I did have a coule of good lines though.)

wanna know a secret? (whispering)...I think Frankie likes being upset. That might be why he's so grumpy all the time. :D Just saying! Heehee!

All I did was copy the url and put an exclamation point at the beginning and the end. (I'm sure you know but just in case.)

that's what i did! Wow!! i must be bad luck or something with computers. Thanks anyway, chris. You're are such a sweetheart!

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Yes, mile high homemade buttercream frosting, and I haven't decided on the sprinkles....

 

Oh, I love that cast, Maven! Elaine Stewart, isn't she the brunette temptress in The Bad and the Beautiful? She's naughty!

 

I can't wait to see the film. I haven't seen it in years. Jack Carson for you, Gail Russell for Grimesy, Jeff Chandler for all the ladies. And Elaine Stewart (briefly) for the gents.

 

Yes, that is the brunette from "The Bad and the Beautiful." You're a movie maven...and can cook too!!

 

(That's what's missing from my repertoire!)

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