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hlywdkjk

The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

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Aloha, Manhattan Blizzard -- That's good, though!  I had not even heard of it before.  I liked the character transition for Eddie.

 

I did it, too.  I liked where his heart was.  He was leading with his heart.

 

I also caught one of my absolute favorites with him a couple of weeks ago: Little Giant.  I think you watched it; it's with Mary Astor.  I really think it's a splendid little riff on not just gangster movies, but society and the whole "upwardly mobile" thing that still goes on in society.  I like how Mary barely gives a second thought to any "lack" in his education or understanding of her world, she only sees who he really is.  It's a good example of a terrific actress doing a lot with a somewhat slight role.

 

Nicely said!  Mary Astor is an actress who seemed to play women who just loved a guy because she loved them.  And you always believed it with Mary.  She exudes honesty and truthful love.  And I have seen Little Giant.  I believe I'd like it more today because I have since seen other gangster comedies since then.  I believe Little Giant was the first I had seen because you suggested it to me.  And sometimes I don't fully appreciate films and sub-genres that I'm first seeing.  That's where inexperience can be detrimental.

 


Now I have to think of more movies for you to watch.  You're seeing so many lately that I'm beginning to trail.

 

You have sent some titles my way but it's been a little while.  I'm not sure where your own mood is.  That's why I chose to ask you again.

 

I watched a few movies lately but they were all re-visits.  Nothing "new", at least not from classic film.

 

You can always talk about them, you know!  Don't shy away from that.

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Hello there, Mr. Grey: 

 

A lot different than a shoe store

 

Ha.. yesEver so much. But you know.. there are things that I value and remember very fondly from that job too. Shoe selling may not SOUND all that glamorous, ha, (and that's probably because it ISN'T) :D

 

But having said that.. it really was a good learning experience for me to be in retail for lo, those many years. If nothing else, I gained a LOT of really good "people" skills by working in that profession (for nearly 9 years.. way back in the 80's.. when you were still a little shaver, sitting back watching HE MAN and SHE-RA. (hahahaha) :D

 

Turns out when you sell shoes (and/or manage a shoestore) if you want to be any good at it,  you have to know how to talk to folks.. and understand how to not only listen to what they want.. but even HELP them know what they want.. ha. (by chatting and getting to know them, a bit, I guess)   And if you stick WITH it.. eventually, you can learn to talk to just about anyone.. about just about anything. ha. :)

 

Who knew? 

 

Oh, no!  My secret is out!  I'm ruined

 

Ha.. at last.. I have ruined. you for something. HA. (now my life is complete) :D

 

Film is a great way to learn a person.  Especially if you discuss the film. A person will quickly reveal their personality to you with what they like and dislike about a film.  What draws them in and what turns them off.  Even something as boring and tiresome as lists tells me a lot about a person.  Heck, if the person complains about making lists and fires off reasons why they can't do lists lets me know some things.  But it's discussion where I can unearth so much about a person.  And since films are about people and scenarios, it really opens the door to how a person is.

 

Ha.. well, I am no sort of list maker.. but I DO know what I like about a movie.. or don't like about it. (even if I can't always articulate it) I just appreciate the fact that it is fun to get a glimpse of what it is that makes folks tick  by talking about what it is that makes the characters in the MOVIES we watch tick too. ha. (if that makes any sense)

 

I have struck out on Babe and Unbreakable, thus far.  But we will see.

 

I think that sweet little Scarlett needs her Uncle Grey Dude to buy her a copy of Babe (if only so you can watch it with her! ha) :D  To be honest thought.. she might be a tiny bit young still.. I think this movie works best for maybe age 6 or 7 and up.. not enough "singing dancing cutesy stuff" for toddlers.. ha. But still .Uncle Grey Dude.. buy it now. watch it now. give it to her later. (and ps..  you know I am kidding.. because, if you remember who you are talking to.. ha.. I am the LAST person to say "buy anything" like that.. Mrs. Cheapskate. ha. Or wait.. Mrs. Thrifty.. that sounds better.. yeah.. That would be me. :D

 

To be honest.. I bet you can find BOTH of these movies at your library... maybe.

 

 

You found one!  I have not seen Union Pacific and I do have it on DVD.  It's a film the New England lass has suggested to me in the past, as well.  So now I have one from you and Movieman.

 

Agh!! yeah.. but.. ha.. did I mention that I have only seen it once and I don't remember it well enough to chat on it???????????????? ha. (All kidding aside.. I hope you will give a chance sometime, but I don't know how you will like it.. if at all. I will see if I can scare  up a copy somehow and watch it too.. It may be a bit harder to find than some, but I will see if I can find it)  I really do remember liking it a lot.. but then I am unapologetic in my enjoyment of DeMille films.. others are not as big a fan. ha. (but HEY, I can live with that.. I have been on that lonely mountain top before)   :D

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Well Grey dude.. I went in and dug around to find my original post on Union Pacific (ha.. just because my memory for it was so out of whack that I didn't really remember much about it except a few details and that I liked it) ha. And I am SO glad I did because hey.. it seems that it was better liked (by others) than I recalled. (maybe I was remembering some other "lonely mountain top moment" from some other movie. ha.) And better yet.. I ALSO read (in the midst of my jabbering old post) that I TAPED that sucker. ha. I don't know if I can dig it out of my stack of OLD dusty "tv tapes" (and if I even bothered to label it.. ha. so who knows if I will be able to find it) but I will look around and see if I can find it or not.

 

Golly.. I am getting old.. ha. I had completely forgotten all of that. (go figure.. So many movies.. so few memory cells.)  :D

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Ha.. yesEver so much. But you know.. there are things that I value and remember very fondly from that job too. Shoe selling may not SOUND all that glamorous, ha, (and that's probably because it ISN'T) :D

 

But having said that.. it really was a good learning experience for me to be in retail for lo, those many years. If nothing else, I gained a LOT of really good "people" skills by working in that profession (for nearly 9 years.. way back in the 80's.. when you were still a little shaver, sitting back watching HE MAN and SHE-RA. (hahahaha) :D

 

And I wasn't even shaving then!  It took me a while for that.

 

Turns out when you sell shoes (and/or manage a shoestore) if you want to be any good at it,  you have to know how to talk to folks.. and understand how to not only listen to what they want.. but even HELP them know what they want.. ha. (by chatting and getting to know them, a bit, I guess)   And if you stick WITH it.. eventually, you can learn to talk to just about anyone.. about just about anything. ha. :)

 

Who knew? 

 

Very good!  You are right, you better like people on some level if you are going to work retail.  And today's world is much more demanding and entitled, so those in retail really get pushed around.  "I'm the customer, so you must take all my cruelty."

 

Oh, no!  My secret is out!  I'm ruined

 

Ha.. at last.. I have ruined. you for something. HA. (now my life is complete) :D

 

I'm sure it won't be the last thing!

 

Ha.. well, I am no sort of list maker.. but I DO know what I like about a movie.. or don't like about it. (even if I can't always articulate it) I just appreciate the fact that it is fun to get a glimpse of what it is that makes folks tick  by talking about what it is that makes the characters in the MOVIES we watch tick too. ha. (if that makes any sense)

 

Yes, you certainly do know what you like and don't like.  That goes a long way in helping a person figure out another.  Lists are more about making decisions and assigning value to things.  They can be a quick judge on a person's critical thinking skills.  It's often a shortcut to knowing if a person is analytical or not.  How far does a person go with organizational thought?  You also learn about a person with the reasons (excuses) why they don't or can't do it.  "It's like choosing between my children!"

 

I think that sweet little Scarlett needs her Uncle Grey Dude to buy her a copy of Babe (if only so you can watch it with her! ha) :D  To be honest thought.. she might be a tiny bit young still.. I think this movie works best for maybe age 6 or 7 and up.. not enough "singing dancing cutesy stuff" for toddlers.. ha. But still .Uncle Grey Dude.. buy it now. watch it now. give it to her later. (and ps..  you know I am kidding.. because, if you remember who you are talking to.. ha.. I am the LAST person to say "buy anything" like that.. Mrs. Cheapskate. ha. Or wait.. Mrs. Thrifty.. that sounds better.. yeah.. That would be me. :D

 

My brother really likes Babe, and he has fairly similar tastes to me.  He told me it's a more mature film than one for Scarlett, who turns three tomorrow.  But she may like the animals, who knows.

 

To be honest.. I bet you can find BOTH of these movies at your library... maybe.

 

What's pathetic is that I have never sought out a DVD at the library.  I just buy, like an idiot.

 

Agh!! yeah.. but.. ha.. did I mention that I have only seen it once and I don't remember it well enough to chat on it???????????????? ha. (All kidding aside.. I hope you will give a chance sometime, but I don't know how you will like it.. if at all. I will see if I can scare  up a copy somehow and watch it too.. It may be a bit harder to find than some, but I will see if I can find it)  I really do remember liking it a lot.. but then I am unapologetic in my enjoyment of DeMille films.. others are not as big a fan. ha. (but HEY, I can live with that.. I have been on that lonely mountain top before) 

 

DeMille doesn't wear well with me, typically.  However, both Little Red Buick and Snippy have mentioned liking the film to me, so I'm hopeful.  And I'm glad to hear you found the discussion about the film on the board and that you may have a chance to dig up your recording.

 

I'm going to try and watch Union Pacific, Fastest Gun Alive, and Gideon's Day this week.

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you better like people on some level if you are going to work retail.  And today's world is much more demanding and entitled, so those in retail really get pushed around.  "I'm the customer, so you must take all my cruelty."

 

I think at the very least, you ought to enjoy helping people if you work in retail. And then more importantly.. you ought to HELP people. ha. Because while I do agree that sometimes those retail jobs leave the worker open to a lot of pushing around from the customer.. it cuts both ways because the stores are filled (these days) with salespeople who really know NOTHING about "sales" and are just warm bodies running cash registers. Very sad to have to say it. but even sadder to have to see it. The days of sales people actually understanding HOW to sell and how to work at making sure the customer knows that their business is appreciated are more or less gone. (at least it seems that way) I remember back in the day.. ha. I used to hold training sessions with my employees to teach them about each new shoe.. and make sure they had the product knowledge needed for how to explain the design of the shoe, and what materials it was made of, and how to fit it to the customer's foot properly.. etc, etc. You don't see too much of that sort of thing these days with most retail stores. Now it is just "cashier" help. 

 

But ha.. enough is enough. I will step down off my soapbox. :D

 

I'm sure it won't be the last thing!

 

I can only hope so. :D

 

He told me it's a more mature film than one for Scarlett, who turns three tomorrow.  But she may like the animals, who knows

 

He's right..  it's not a "toddler" pic, for sure. She probably would enjoy the animals (for a while) but they do most of the talking.. ha. so it is not as much action from them as it is dialogue, so she'd wear out on it at this age. She would probably need a couple more years.. ha. but I hope it doesn't take YOU that long to watch it. :D

 

What's pathetic is that I have never sought out a DVD at the library.  I just buy, like an idiot.

 

Agh!!!!!!!!!!! That is like a stab in the heart to a penny pincher like me. ha. I think you should TRY the library some time. I bet you would be surprised what they might have available there for classic films. (but.. ha. I do confess, the down side is.. you have to return them by their due date. THAT would be hard to keep up with for you, sometimes. (with as many movies as you watch) :) 

 

DeMille doesn't wear well with me, typically.  

 

He can be a bit over the top sometimes. Almost like a spectacle. ha. He does go out of his way to put on a show. But I do enjoy a lot of the "spectacle" sometimes. (which is odd for me, because usually I like things to be a bit simpler)  Union Pacific was just a lot of fun, as I recall.. and the conflict between the two male leads.. and the special effects (as I recall there are a couple of pretty "good" train wrecks) it all added up to a very entertaining "spectacle" ha. :)  

 

And I'm glad to hear you found the discussion about the film on the board and that you may have a chance to dig up your recording.

 

Well don't get TOO impressed... yet. I have NO idea where that tape is. We have half our movie collection stored out in the shed (even a year after we did our remodel work.. the QT boxed up a bunch of stuff to get it out of the way.. and he did NOT box it in a way that you can tell what is in the box.. but I still love him. HA! (he will say.. he was just getting things cleared out so he could work.. I would say he just MADE more work.. because we have to make a huge mess to UNbox it all trying to figure out what's what. HA!) But did I mention I still love him.. he is after all.. awfully cute (as he nickname implies) :D 

I'm going to try and watch Union Pacific, Fastest Gun Alive, and Gideon's Day this week.

 

Well I HOPE I can find the one I suggested at least because I am not sure if I am going to be able to find copies of EITHER of the those last two either. It would be good if I can find a copy of at least ONE of these films to watch. ha. I hate to miss out on the fun.

 

(boy.. do I sound pitiful or WHAT??) ha. 

 

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OH.. and PS, I meant to post this earlier, but got in too big of a hurry.. ha. (trying to multi-task cooking supper and catch up on here) But HAPPY Birthday to little Miss Scarlett,  tomorrow. Hope she has a wonderful day. Three years old, already! This calls for a special treat.. a sweet little cupcake for a sweet little darlin'. :) 

 

birthday-cupcake_zpsbc378040.png

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Thank you for wishing Scarlett a "Happy Birthday", Quiet Gal.  Her third birthday party was on Saturday.  It was a lot of fun.  She was very happy that day.  She never napped.  She got loads of gifts.  She even got her first bike.  A "Frozen" bike.  One of my gifts to her was tickets to see Frozen on Ice, which was a week ago today.  It was her first big event out.  She seemed to handle it pretty well.  She got tired after the intermission, though.

 

I figured I'd go ahead and post all the films I have watched since my last post.  At least the classic ones.  I may even post the contemporary ones later on, too.  This is what I have watched:

 

Adventure (1945)

The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad (1949)

Bad Blonde (The Story of Miss Goddess) (1953)

Betrayed (1954)

Blackout (1954)

Charlie Chan's Murder Cruise (1940)

The Cobweb (1955)

Come Live with Me (1941)

Crossroads (1942)

The Deadly Game (1954)

The Death Kiss (1932)

The Devil Bat (1940)

Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

The Doctor Takes a Wife (1940)

Dumbo (1941)

The Fastest Gun Alive (1956)

Frankenstein - 1970 (1958)

The Gambler and the Lady (1952)

Gideon's Day (1958)

Heat Wave (1954)

In the Navy (1941)

The Jungle Book (1967)

Kansas Raiders (1950)

Lady and the Tramp (1955)

Man Bait (1952)

Maniac (1963)

The Man in Possession (1931)

Margie (1946)

Never Take Candy from a Stranger (1960)

A Night to Remember (1958)

101 Dalmations (1961)

Paid to Kill (1954)

The Secret of Madame Blanche (1933)

The Snorkel (1958)

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)

Stolen Face (1952)

Terror Street (1953)

Third Finger, Left Hand (1940)

The Unguarded Hour (1936)

Union Pacific (1939)

The Walking Dead (1936)

White Cliffs of Dover (1940)

You'll Find Out (1944)

 

Any thoughts on these films before I share my own thoughts?

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Oh what a list.  Lots I haven't heard of or can't recall (what else is new?) but the one that took me most by surprise was THE DOCTOR TAKES A WIFE.  I really liked that one.  And I don't always enjoy doctor/hospital type themes.  But this one was entertaining and touching.  Similar sort of relationship as PEOPLE WILL TALK but totally different approach and tone.

 

The Man in Possession is one of my favorite early Montgomery films.  It's a bit "stagey" but the script is super witty and though it is a bit risque, it's classy.

 

I of course like Gideon's Day, though it can be a little slow, and Margie is a very sweet, old fashioned movie.  This and Apartment for Peggy are two good early Jeanne Crain films with similar characters.

 

Then there's The Fastest Gun Alive; I think you said you wrote about it in Western Rambles so I'll mosey there.  Good flick.

 

 

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Hellooo Mr. Grey!! So happy to hear that Little Miss Scarlett has a lovely birthday! (ha.. I can just imagine she was beside herself over Frozen on Ice (did you get to go too??) I imagine all the excitement did wear her out. ha. There were probably a whole lot of little ones on "sensory overload" at that event, I am sure.

 

And why not?? ha. Elsa and Anna have appeared to take over the world of late. ha. (at least in the circles I travel in these days) :D  It's hard to go anywhere or do anything without running into them. But I have to confess that is actually a MUCH better story (for a Disney Princess movie) that I even expected. I am hit and miss on some of those.. but I really enjoyed that one a lot. Very a-typical. (and I have to say.. the bad guy is EXTREMELY well hidden.. I never saw him coming.. at all. That is a rare feat for a Disney movie.

 

I figured I'd go ahead and post all the films I have watched since my last post.  At least the classic ones.  I may even post the contemporary ones later on, too.  This is what I have watched:

 

Woo HOO.. a list I can finally WORK with. :D You actually hit several that I have seen. (ok.. ha.. so along with Union Pacific.. most of the others were are all Disney) But I also have seen (and own) A Night To Remember. That is one that the QT and I both like (despite the grim subject matter) It is a THOUSAND times better rendition (even if perhaps not as accurate in some details) than the big blockbuster Titanic from 1997. (because as far as I am concerned they SHOULD have named that movie, "Hug, Hug, Kiss, Kiss.. and by the Way the Boat Sank" HA) 

 

A Night To Remember is a much better story. 

 

And you were right.. we DO have a lot of those Disney movies.. 101 Dalmatians, Snow White, Lady and the Tramp (I probably like that one the best out of the ones you listed) We don't own The Jungle Book, but I have seen it a few times. I don't really like it too much, but it's got some good moments (musically) 

 

I went through all of the ones on your list and googled them. And I am happy to say I found several on youtube. (woo hoo!) So I will see if I can watch some of them soon, and maybe can chat on those with you.. here are the ones I found.. tell me which ones  you think I'd like best and I'll watch those first:  The Death Kiss, The Devil Bat, Man Bait, Mania, Stolen Face, and Blackout.

 

(And I THINK I also found 3rd Finger, Left Hand.. but I am not sure if it is all there or not, so I might be taking a chance. Still could try and watch it) 

 

OH.. and PS: please do list your contemporary ones.. maybe I have seen some of them too! :) ha.. maybe.. (have you ever seen Hugo?? I think  you would REALLLLLYYYY like that film a LOT.. maybe.. perhaps.. possibly.. I think) :D

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Howdy Ma!  :D

 

A Night To Remember is a much better story.

 

Oh, boy.  don't even get me started on the '97 movie.  I am DEFINITELY way upon the mountaintop when it comes to opinion.  I cannot STAND it.  I saw it when it came out, I happened to be in London at the time.  Everyone was crying at the end I was just relieved I could finally walk out!!  I think the Titanic sank this time from the director's gigantic ego.

 

On the other hand, A Night to Remember is the best telling of the account I've seen.  the one with Barbara Stanwyck and Clifton Webb is entertaining, but not realistic nor as gripping.  I've also read A Night to Remember, the book, in high school I think it was.  Very detailed.  So chilling.

 

P.S.  I started a "John Ford" thread in Films/Filmakers, finally, after all this time.  So if you ever get a hankering to talk about one of his movies, please feel free to post there. :rolleyes:

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Well ALOHA, little Island Girl!! :) 

 

don't even get me started on the '97 movie.

 

Ha.. we are on the mountain together for sure, kid. I still remember how grueling it was just sitting there in the theater waiting.. and waiting.. and waiting.. ha. There were "moments' here and there that were pretty good, I do confess. The special effects were ALL they said and more. So for an FX junkie like me.. it was pretty well done, I admit. But UGH.. to wrap such an amazing human tragedy as this into one huge "love fest" movie.. agh. (and don't get me wrong.. I like a good love story now and then) but they really went.. well.. too far. (so very, very, very.. too far) 

 

Ok.. I will stop.. ha. (because I COULD rant further.. but it would take almost as long as the movie did for me to stop) :D

 

On the other hand, A Night to Remember is the best telling of the account I've seen

 

I agree.. and I have seen several (feature film and made for tv too) I have seen the Barbara one. but boy, it's been a good long while. I think I remember enough of it to say I didn't like it nearly as well as ANTR, but not much of the details. didn't she have a couple of kids.. and a husband who was not too nice.. or was she the not too nice one.. ha I don't remember.. but i just recall there was some family conflict as a part of the story. 

 

I started a "John Ford" thread in Films/Filmakers, finally, after all this time.  So if you ever get a hankering to talk about one of his movies, please feel free to post there.

 

I just saw that! Another stroke of genius! :) I hope to have the chance to revisit some Pappy movies soon. (This Spring, I am going to be teaching a pre-teen/teenage " Introduction to Classic Film" club as a part of a group that the kidling belongs to (ha.. be worried..  be very worried.. ME.. teaching anyone about classic film.. agh!)  and I am already sorting through a variety of movies and trying to get a nice variety of genres to hopefully appeal to a broad range of "teenage minds" ha. Oh me.. what WAS I thinking for signing up for THAT??) Anyway.. I am hoping to use at least one (or two) Fordies as a part of that class.. so I'll be rewatching some of them to see what might fit our agenda. It will be fun to have a place to chat on them all with you again here too. :) 

 

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I like "A Night To Remember" thanks in no small part to Kenneth More. It is told well and the effects are great. Might I suggest to anyone that if More is to your liking you check "Sink The Bismarck." A docudrama to be sure but again he is very solid.

 

If "Gideon's Day" is another name for the Jack Hawkins/John Ford film it ranks as maybe the most dull film I have seen of Ford's. For me it was a really long day and while Hawkins is fine nothing much happens.

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I find: The Death Kiss (1932) to be great good fun! It is mildly antic-comedy murder mystery. I love many lines in the movie. It is very strongly of its period genre and yet is unique.

 

I know well of:

The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad (1949)

Blackout (1954)

The Cobweb (1955)

The Devil Bat (1940)

Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

The Doctor Takes a Wife (1940)

Dumbo (1941)

Frankenstein - 1970 (1958)

The Jungle Book (1967)

Lady and the Tramp (1955)

101 Dalmations (1961)

The Secret of Madame Blanche (1933)

The Snorkel (1958)

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)

Third Finger, Left Hand (1940)

The Unguarded Hour (1936)

Union Pacific (1939)

I hope that you liked them.

 

I am confused of: You'll Find Out (1944). The only movie of that title which I know stars Kay Kyser and was released in 1940. It is a nice little movie which I enjoy very much but which will likely never become one of my favorites.

 

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1. The Fastest Gun Alive (1956) -- A pretty good western with a little bit of a High Noon current to it.  Glenn Ford plays a rather different kind of western protagonist.  One that fascinated me.  And the deeper the story got, the more interesting he became.  Even when you think you have him figured out, more is revealed.  Broderick Crawford plays the baddie in this one.  He's very "Broderick", gruffly barking all over the place.  Jeanne Crain plays Ford's wife.  She's as beautiful as ever here, playing a stressed pregnant wife.  While not a demanding role for her, she does have a presence in the film.  John Dehner, Leif Erickson, Allyn Joslyn, and Noah Beery, Jr. comprise a good supporting cast.
 

2. Never Take Candy from a Stranger (1960) -- You want to talk about creepy, you want to talk about this film.  The beginning of the film sets the stage perfectly.  It's a very unsettling opening to a picture.  From there, the film presents what to do about what has happened.  The final act solves it for us.  For a film in 1960, this is a strong one in terms of content.  What's the subject matter?  A creepy, old rich man and two preteen girls.  You can use your imagination from there.
 

3. Diamonds Are Forever (1971) -- This is my least favorite of the Bond films I have watched but I still like it enough to place it ahead of other films.  I'm not sure why, though.  I guess my liking Bond films and my liking Sean Connery as Bond are the biggest reasons why.  I did find Sean to be funny in this one.  But the entire story and its undertaking was rather weak for Bond.
 

4. A Night to Remember (1958) -- I'm the one person who hasn't seen Titanic, so I can't compare the two.  I do know I refused to watch the 1997 film because I felt it was simply "Romeo and Juliet" on the Titanic and I felt that cheapened the actual event.  It also didn't help that every girl kept saying it's the greatest film ever and I couldn't accept history being used in such a shameless way.  Blah.  As for this film, I thought is was quite good.  I thought the actual sinking of the ship was well done.  I liked the different attitudes that were presented on the ship.  I greatly enjoyed Kenneth More's performance.  He was marvelous.  The feel of the film was also quite good.  It was very well made.

 

5. Lady and the Tramp (1955) -- Life on the leash!  Interestingly enough, I watched Out of Africa and Adventure before I watched this one and all three films featured a male fearing a settled (captive) life and a female wanting her man to live such a life with her.  The iconic spaghetti scene between Lady and "Tramp" is still magical to me.  It's such a lovely scene.  There's a later scene that is quite risque.  It leads to a litter.  I really enjoy the look of these classic Disney films.

 

6. The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad (1949) -- My entire basis of what the Headless Horseman should look like stems from this Disney film.  I love the look of him in this picture.  I also enjoy this telling of "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow".  I like Bing Crosby being our narrator and Ichabod.  Love the songs and Bing singing them.  I also enjoy the humor.  "The Wind of the Willows" story is much less appealing to me, but I did enjoy Basil Rathbone's narration and Eric Blore's "Mr. Toad".  The showdown at the castle was done quite well.
 

7. Dumbo (1941) -- What a trippy film with a strong motherly kick.  The cruelty of people.  I mean, elephants.  The film ends up being a great lesson in accepting differences.  But Society never makes this easy.  I love how Dumbo is drawn, particularly his facial expressions.  You can just feel his sadness and loneliness.  The scenes with the crows and "pink elephants" are wild.  I was not expecting any of it.  It was a loving ride that I enjoyed.
 

8. Charlie Chan's Murder Cruise (1940) -- One of the better Chan entries that I have watched to date.  The Chan formula is enhanced a great deal by the presence of Lionel Atwill and Leo Carroll.  Cora Witherspoon is also around for comic relief.  I also enjoy the setting of a cruise ship.
 

9. Bad Blonde (The Story of Miss Goddess) (1953) -- Of the Hammer films noir that I have watched thus far, this has been the one I have liked most.  It's fairly similar to The Postman Always Rings Twice.  Miss G (Barbara Payton) is married to an older gentleman but likes to have her fun with the younger fellas.  Her latest victim is Charlie (John Slater), a young boxer who has the chance to make it big.  What she ends up doing to get Charlie to do her bidding is rather sensational for the time.  This leads to some stunning moments.  Barbara sizzles in this one.

 

10. Union Pacific (1939) -- Quiet Gal's suggestion proves to be a good one!  I found this film to be entertaining.  Barbara Stanwyck as "Mollie" is a huge reason why.  Once I got past her Irish accent, I started to really go for her.  She plays my kind of gal.  She's a passionate woman who loves strongly.  Joel McCrea is terrific as the protector of interests, including some of his own.  I loved his demeanor.  Brian Donlevy is always good as a heavy.  I loved his henchmen that kept showing up and leaving pretty quickly thanks to McCrea.  I especially liked Leach (Lynne Overman) and Fiesta (Akim Tamiroff), who kept an eye on Joel.  Leach had me laughing out loud.  The film is real nice mix of action, comedy, and drama.  It's a crowd pleaser, to be sure.

 

11. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) -- I was very into the beginning of this film and the end.  Basically, whenever the stepmother was around, I was interested.  The middle of the film drags for me because the dwarfs drain me.  They wear me out.  I love the scenes with Snow White and the animals, though.  The music is consistently good in the film.  And I love how Snow White is drawn and animated.  She has a such a magnificent look to her.  I can't believe how dark the opening is.  Bring me her heart!  Wow!
 

12. The Walking Dead (1936) -- A rather unique film that combines the gangster and horror genres quite nicely.  Boris Karloff is wrongly accused and ends up frying for it.  But is he completely dead?  Welcome to horror.  Karloff is out for revenge and how he exacts this revenge is interesting.  What really helps elevate this film are the cast of baddies.  You get Ricardo Cortez, Barton MacLane, and Joe Sawyer.  They are all excellent.  Kindly Edmund Gwenn plays the doctor who helps aid Karloff.  This is a quality Karloff flick.

 

13. You'll Find Out (1940) -- Why I don't like 30s horror comedies but I like those from the 40s is a bit of a mystery to me.  Maybe because the comedy is more in the foreground in the 40s.  But this is my kind of comedic horror film.  And it surely doesn't hurt to have three masters teaming up.  Those being Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, and Peter Lorre.  Of the three, Bela is the one who shines the most.  He's exceptional.  I believe this is my first Kay Kyser film and I pretty much liked him.  I liked "Ish Kabibble" the very most, though.  He was a riot.

 

14. Gideon's Day (1958) -- John Ford directing Scotland Yard?  Get out of here!  That would be like John Wayne playing a detective in England.  Oh, wait.  Now I know Ford's fans like him with horses and battleships, but I have to say, I mostly liked this Fordian "vacation".  Jack Hawkins is the reason why.  His ability to carry off the different emotional swings throughout his day is impressive.  I love his strong presence and his sense of humor.  Is there great emotion in the film?  Not really.  Is there meat to the story?  No.  But for a day's journey, it's not bad.

 

15. The Jungle Book (1967) -- After watching the wonderful live-action version of this story earlier this year, I came to this version with some expectations.  My expectations weren't met.  I found this offering to be much less.  Still, I enjoyed it enough because of Baloo (Phil Harris), George Sanders, and the songs.

 

16. 101 Dalmations (1961) -- Thank goodness for Cruella de Vil (Betty Lou Gerson)!  She makes the film for me.  The puppies and their plight aren't nearly as interesting to me as Cruella.  I do like some of the supporting characters, such as the Colonel (J. Pat O'Malley).

 

17. Come Live with Me (1941) -- Jimmy and Hedy!  Woohoo!  This isn't a particularly funny or special kind of romantic comedy, but I found it charming because of Jimmy.  Jimmy is always so darn good.  Hedy is stunning.  She's as beautiful as they come.  That makes her very likable with me.  Like many comedies from this time, there is a goofy item or phrase that unites our reluctant couple.  I liked it quite a bit.  The gist of the story is that Hedy needs to find a man to marry to avoid deportation.  Jimmy, a penniless writer, is her man.  To complicate matters, Hedy is in love with a married man, played by Ian Hunter.  As only Hollywood would have it, Ian is also a publisher.
 

18. The Doctor Takes a Wife (1940) -- While watching this film, I could sense the modern woman gagging.  What starts off as a film speaking for feminism ends up with a woman looking to wait on her man, hand and foot.  That aside, I enjoyed this one.  I greatly enjoyed Loretta Young's disgust and jealousy and the snappy wisecracks those feelings created.  She's especially funny when making fun of the snobby Gail Patrick, who is wonderful in the film.  Ray Milland is also quite enjoyable, playing the male chauvinist pig professor/doctor.  One of my favorite scenes has Ray bouncing back and forth between apartments, trying to appease Gail and the brass from the university.  It reminded me of one of my favorite shows, Three's Company.
 

19. Adventure (1945) -- Greer Garson with Clark Gable?  That ain't gonna work.  But, for some reason, it does for me.  And it's the kind of characters each plays that makes it work for me.  Greer plays a party pooper librarian and Clark is a loudmouthed captain of a ship.  The two cross paths thanks to Thomas Mitchell's "Mudgin", who is seeking information on his cursed soul at the library.  We all do that.  Gable and Greer clash from the start and their unlikely romance is hatched.  Mitchell is quite good as Gable's buddy and Joan Blondell is equally as good as Greer's easy-going roommate and friend.  Gable is right at home playing the "free" man and Greer is snug as the woman wishing he were around.  I liked seeing Greer in this film.  It is her character that goes through the roller coaster of emotions and evolves some.  I enjoyed that the most.  If you don't like Gable running at the mouth for an entire film, you need to skip this one.
 

20. Margie (1946) -- I don't know how I could like a coming-of-age film about a high school girl but here we are.  While this film is nothing but fluff, it's enjoyable fluff.  Jeanne Crain is "Margie" and she's adorable.  Her and her bloomers.  I also loved Barbara Lawrence, who plays Miss Goddess.  Her of the rouge on the knees, the showing of skin, and the smooching of "Johnnykins".  Glenn Langan plays the French teacher that has all the girls a flutter.  Alan Young, "Wwwwwilbur" to me, is the goofy poet who is in love with Margie.  And Conrad Janis is "Johnnykins", Mr. Cool.  Nothing deep and everything sweet is what you'll get.

 

21. Betrayed (1954) -- Is that Lana Turner?!  She's a brunette?  And a spy?!  Well, whaddya know.  While this is not a top-notch spy film, I still found it entertaining because of the principles.  Namely, Victor Mature, who plays "The Scarf".  Mature is loads of fun in this one.  Lana is seen smacking and laying some smackers on Gable. She's also amorous with Vic.  Ohhhh, Lana.  I liked the ending.
 

22. The Man in Possession (1931) -- I found this film to be rather witty and surprisingly risque.  Thank goodness for pre-codes!  Robert Montgomery is the star of the show, as he decides to become the butler for a beautiful woman (Irene Purcell), who is living way above her means.  Things get messy when two suitors, one being Robert's older brother, come a calling for the young lady.  Can he win her love?  There are some funny situations in the film.  There's also a very erotic scene, which is my favorite.  Irene is quite lovely.  I also found Charlotte Greenwood to be terribly funny.  You'll also find Alan Mowbray, Reginald Owen, and C. Aubrey Smith.

 

23. Heat Wave (1954) -- This is another "The Postman Always Rings Twice" type of film.  The strength of the story has to be the woman and Hillary Brooke is quite good in this role.  She brings it.  Alex Nicol plays the younger man, a struggling writer, and Sidney James plays the older husband who knows how disloyal his young wife is.  But he doesn't fight it.  Nicol and James actually strike up a friendship and this creates an interesting emotional landscape for later in the film.  James is superb.  The ending isn't the best, thus the lower ranking for me.

 

24. Kansas Raiders (1950) -- Bland titles such as this often lead me to think "boring".  But I'm usually proven wrong.  This film isn't boring.  It's about Quantrill's Raiders.  Brian Donlevy plays Quantrill.  If it's Donlevy, you know he's nothing but sweet and innocent.  Audie Murphy plays no other than Jesse James.  Yeah, I can't say I believed it, either.  You also get Frank James (Richard Long), Kit Dalton (Tony Curtis), and the Younger brothers (James Best and Dewey Martin) in this one.  A lot of historical figures.  The conflict is between the James gang and Donlevy's war orders for them.  Good luck with that, Quantrill!  This isn't a top-flight western, but it's not bad at all.

 

25. Man Bait (1952) -- George Brent and Diana Dors?  Really?  Uh-oh.  Brent is up against it financially and is considering some crazy things to collect on insurance.  The thing is, someone else has an eye on his insurance money, too.  Enter Diana.  Now do you think everyone is going to find a happy ending in this kind of film?  The entire set-up for the film is pretty good.  And there are some high moments to be found, too.  But the picture doesn't finish strongly, and this drags it down for me.  Diana is worth seeing.  She's good.

 

26. The Devil Bat (1940) -- I need to hook my new computer up so I can take some caps.  I'd take some of this one.  The bats in this Bela Lugosi horror flick are a trip.  And if you are someone who enjoys cheesy effects, you'll like this one.  I pretty much enjoyed the film because of the ridiculous premise and Bela.  Lugosi is crazy and good.  This is how I like him.  Those surrounding him are bland.  But that means nothing when you get Bela being Bela.
 

27. Stolen Face (1952) -- I was very excited to watch this film because of Lizabeth Scott.  My hopeful expectations were soon brought down by a hit-and-miss script.  The story itself is on the strange side, as a plastic surgeon (Paul Henreid) decides to remake a scarred woman into the woman who spurned him years ago.  What's with Paul and plastic surgery?!  In some ways, this is a horror film noir since Paul is basically playing a mad scientist.  The twist in the film doesn't make it interesting.  It all becomes frustrating by film's end.

 

28. Maniac (1963) -- The best part of this film is the opening.  It starts with a serious bang.  It sets the mood well.  Then we fall into an interesting love triangle between a traveler (Kerwin Mathews), a mother (Nadia Gray), and a daughter (Liliane Brousse).  That was rather fascinating.  But then it goes over a cliff with an ending that is extremely weak.

 

29. The Snorkel (1958) -- More Hammer horror.  And, once again, this one starts out exceptionally well.  It's quiet and haunting.  Then it becomes an exercise in believing a young girl or not.  It's similar to Gaslight, in this regard.  The ending is tongue in cheek.  It's very much a wink.

 

30. The Cobweb (1955) -- Is there anything more ludicrous than drapes as a key plot point?  Drapes?!  I surely hope Vincente Minnelli was mocking psychiatry with this one.  If it's serious... oh boy.  Thank goodness for Gloria Grahame.  Gloria was absolutely wonderful in this film.  Even though she's the evildoer in this one, she's still the most likable one!  What an interesting cast: Richard Widmark, Charles Boyer, Lauren Bacall, Lillian Gish, and Oscar Levant.  I found Susan Strasberg to be very cute in this one, too.  But those drapes!  Unbelievable!
 

31. Blackout (1954) -- This is one of those "in a daze" films noir.  Dane Clark is our drunken hero, a down-and-out artist who is offered $500 to marry a woman he's never met before.  Does he?  He sure can't remember.  To make things worse, his wife is nowhere to be found and he's implicated in a murder.  The set-up is good, but the execution isn't.  The film plays very ordinary and is mostly unrewarding.
 

32. The Unguarded Hour (1936) -- Blackmail is the name of the game in this solid effort.  Loretta Young is the wife of Franchot Tone, a district attorney riding high.  The only problem is Franchot has a past and Henry Daniell lets Loretta know about it.  It's now up to Loretta to protect her husband's good name.  Nothing ever goes wrong when you do that.  The premise is better than its undertaking, but the film is very watchable.

 

33. Terror Street (1953) -- Dan Duryea in film noir is almost always a winning combination with me.  Not in this one.  While Duryea is quite good, this story is lackluster.  As the story goes, Dan finds himself in a frame-up and he has 36 hours to clear his name.  That's the good.  Dan's journey to prove himself can be tedious at times.  We spend a good deal of time with him and a young woman (Elsie Albiin), as the two of them strike up a relationship.  This really slows the film and eliminates the tension.  The picture never recovers.

 

34. Third Finger, Left Hand (1940) -- Sometimes you feel like Melvyn Douglas, sometimes you don't. I wasn't going for him in this one.  I also didn't go for Myrna Loy too much, which is shocking.  It must be the script.  Myrna is the editor of a magazine that pretends to have a husband as a form of job security.  Melvyn takes a fancy to Myrna and soon discovers her guise.  He uses this to his advantage and the silliness of a romantic comedy ensues.  I'm usually pretty forgiving with these kind of films, but I just couldn't get into this one.
 

35. Crossroads (1942) -- William Powell and Hedy Lamarr in an amnesia crime film?  Sounds good to me!  I was duped.  It's not.  Bill and Hedy are a newly-married couple who find themselves entrapped by Bill's past.  The problem is, Bill suffered amnesia years ago and he has no idea who he really is and what he did.  Could he actually be a murderer?  This could pose a problem with his pursuit of being an ambassador.  The film is rather slow and tidy.

 

36. The Deadly Game (1954) -- A mostly uninteresting Hammer film noir starring Lloyd Bridges.  Bridges gets himself mixed up in the middle of a murder case and it's up to him to figure out who is really behind this murder.  The key seems to be an envelope he was asked to deliver by the deceased.  Who wants this envelope and why?  Finlay Currie is the best thing about the film.
 

37. Paid to Kill (1954) -- Dane Clark stars in this Hammer film noir about a guy who hires a hit man to knock him off so that his wife can collect on a life insurance policy.  A development throws everything off.  Clark is an actor that can run hot and cold with me.  He's mostly likable in this film, but the story isn't.

 

38. In the Navy (1941) -- I'm quickly learning that I don't like the early Abbott & Costello films because they are more about the music than the comedy.  I'm also not crazy about military settings, so this one barely got off the ground with me.

 

39. The Death Kiss (1932) -- For some reason or another, I typically struggle with the mixing of comedy with horror/mystery in the early-30s.  That's what this film delivers.  While the actual mystery is fairly solid, the intrusion of comedy just keeps me at a distance.  This was also the case with my not liking Doctor X and Murders in the Zoo.  I did like David Manners and his very loose, confident manner.  He's terrific.  Bela Lugosi is one of the suspects but his screen time is on the short side.
 

40. The Gambler and the Lady (1952) -- Yet another Hammer film noir starring Dane Clark.  This one finds Dane as a gangster who is looking for refinement.  My Fair Gambler?  Pretty much.  Clark wants to be a legit businessman but the arrival of a competing gangster forces his hand.  The film's uneven feel dragged it down for me.

 

41. Frankenstein - 1970 (1958) -- Boris Karloff leases his castle to a film crew and he proceeds to eliminate the crew via his "experiment".  Karloff tries to save this silly film but he falls short.

 

42. The Secret of Madame Blanche (1933) -- Another version of the "Madame X" story.  Irene Dunne plays the titular role here and she does just fine.  What I liked most about the film is the beginning, where two dramatic events occur that completely change Irene's fate.  Lionel Atwill plays the intrusive father-in-law who puts everything in motion.  He eventually fades into the background.  The final act features a new spin on the "Madame X" story.  It's a not bad one, either.

 

43. White Cliffs of Dover (1940) -- Ugh!  I was very bored watching this one.  I do not like films that cover the life of a character and then throw big events at you.  One minute a baby is born, the next the father is killed, the next the grandparents are dead.  That stuff drives me nuts.  The setting is also a troublesome area for me.  I'm not big on the stiff British fare.  Then toss in the "rally around the flag" of the day and I'm jumping off the White Cliffs of Dover.

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Bonjour, Pappy's Girl -- Oh what a list.  Lots I haven't heard of or can't recall (what else is new?)

 

But you have seen every film!  I cannot be watching ones you haven't seen.  You must be getting old and forgetful. :P

 

but the one that took me most by surprise was THE DOCTOR TAKES A WIFE.  I really liked that one.  And I don't always enjoy doctor/hospital type themes.  But this one was entertaining and touching.  Similar sort of relationship as PEOPLE WILL TALK but totally different approach and tone.

 

Are we talking about the same film?  Ray Milland and Loretta Young?

 

The Man in Possession is one of my favorite early Montgomery films.  It's a bit "stagey" but the script is super witty and though it is a bit risque, it's classy.

 

I agree with your assessment.  Montgomery is always so good in these kind of films.  I also liked Irene Purcell.  She was quite lovely.  I thought she was very comfortable with your Bobby.

 

I of course like Gideon's Day, though it can be a little slow, and Margie is a very sweet, old fashioned movie.  This and Apartment for Peggy are two good early Jeanne Crain films with similar characters.

 

I also liked Gideon's Day.  The pacing is a little slow, but I didn't mind that.  I enjoyed the change of pace for Ford.  Your description of Margie is right on target.  It's terribly sweet and I didn't mine it because of Jeanne Crain.

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How do, Piecemaker -- Hellooo Mr. Grey!! So happy to hear that Little Miss Scarlett has a lovely birthday! (ha.. I can just imagine she was beside herself over Frozen on Ice (did you get to go too??) I imagine all the excitement did wear her out. ha. There were probably a whole lot of little ones on "sensory overload" at that event, I am sure.

 

No, I didn't get to go.  I was the possible fill-in if my brother had to work in the evening.  But he was able to attend.  Scarlett loved the first half of Frozen on Ice but the intermission hit and then she got sleepy, which makes her restless.

 

And why not?? ha. Elsa and Anna have appeared to take over the world of late. ha. (at least in the circles I travel in these days) :D  It's hard to go anywhere or do anything without running into them. But I have to confess that is actually a MUCH better story (for a Disney Princess movie) that I even expected. I am hit and miss on some of those.. but I really enjoyed that one a lot. Very a-typical. (and I have to say.. the bad guy is EXTREMELY well hidden.. I never saw him coming.. at all. That is a rare feat for a Disney movie.

 

We will probably discuss Frozen when I post my contemporary list.  And Elsa and Anna have definitely taken over the little girl world.

 

Woo HOO.. a list I can finally WORK with. :D You actually hit several that I have seen. (ok.. ha.. so along with Union Pacific.. most of the others were are all Disney) But I also have seen (and own) A Night To Remember. That is one that the QT and I both like (despite the grim subject matter) It is a THOUSAND times better rendition (even if perhaps not as accurate in some details) than the big blockbuster Titanic from 1997. (because as far as I am concerned they SHOULD have named that movie, "Hug, Hug, Kiss, Kiss.. and by the Way the Boat Sank" HA) 

 

:D  You're quite the romantic! :P

 

And you were right.. we DO have a lot of those Disney movies.. 101 Dalmatians, Snow White, Lady and the Tramp (I probably like that one the best out of the ones you listed) We don't own The Jungle Book, but I have seen it a few times. I don't really like it too much, but it's got some good moments (musically) 

 

I figured as much.  Most mothers with a daughter watch lots of Disney.

 

I went through all of the ones on your list and googled them. And I am happy to say I found several on youtube. (woo hoo!) So I will see if I can watch some of them soon, and maybe can chat on those with you.. here are the ones I found.. tell me which ones  you think I'd like best and I'll watch those first:  The Death Kiss, The Devil Bat, Man Bait, Mania, Stolen Face, and Blackout.

 

I can't say I'd suggest any of those for you.  Of that group, I'd say The Death Kiss would be the one you'd like the most.  Of the ones I watched, I'd say you'd like The Fastest Gun Alive, Gideon's Day, The Walking Dead, and You'll Find Out.  I also think you would enjoy Charlie Chan.

 

You'll Find Out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFbMl3GR4-g

 

It starts slow but then it becomes a "haunted house" film.

 

I'm going to watch this film fairly soon:

 

 

 

OH.. and PS: please do list your contemporary ones.. maybe I have seen some of them too! :) ha.. maybe.. (have you ever seen Hugo?? I think  you would REALLLLLYYYY like that film a LOT.. maybe.. perhaps.. possibly.. I think) :D

 

There's about 25 contemporary films that I have watched and I'd guess you have seen half of them.  I'll look into Hugo.

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"Mrs. Capuchin"?  Were you always married to Capuchin or is this news?

 

I am confused of: You'll Find Out (1944). The only movie of that title which I know stars Kay Kyser and was released in 1940. It is a nice little movie which I enjoy very much but which will likely never become one of my favorites.

 

My mistake!  It's the 1940 film.

 

I find: The Death Kiss (1932) to be great good fun! It is mildly antic-comedy murder mystery. I love many lines in the movie. It is very strongly of its period genre and yet is unique.

 

You are right, it is very much in keeping with its period genre.  And it's pretty good for its kind.  It really is.

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"Mrs. Capuchin"?  Were you always married to Capuchin or is this news?

 

 

It was thought best that I apply for citizenship through naturalization process because immigration officials have low regard for women from my part of the world marrying American men as they think women do it only to become citizen. They often use any thin excuse to deny citizenship. It was for this reason that I had to use standard process. It was our plan to marry soon after.

 

I was granted United States citizenship on a Friday in September. We were married Monday morning following. We have just returned from honeymoon.

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Fantastic!  Congratulations!  That's wonderful news on both fronts.  I'm very happy for you and yours.  May you have continued happiness.

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Fantastic!  Congratulations!  That's wonderful news on both fronts.  I'm very happy for you and yours.  May you have continued happiness.

 

I thank you very much for your kind words and good wishes.

 

It feels very much as if it is the end of an era of restraint and endless waiting.

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Hi,

boy i got a couple of your titles completely mixed up with other movies.  sorry about that.

 

 


1. The Fastest Gun Alive (1956) -- A pretty good western with a little bit of a High Noon current to it.  Glenn Ford plays a rather different kind of western protagonist.  One that fascinated me.  And the deeper the story got, the more interesting he became.  Even when you think you have him figured out, more is revealed.  Broderick Crawford plays the baddie in this one.  He's very "Broderick", gruffly barking all over the place.  Jeanne Crain plays Ford's wife.  She's as beautiful as ever here, playing a stressed pregnant wife.  While not a demanding role for her, she does have a presence in the film.  John Dehner, Leif Erickson, Allyn Joslyn, and Noah Beery, Jr. comprise a good supporting cast.
 

I love the ending.  It was completely unexpected for me and I thought a great solution to glenn ford's "problem". :D

 

2. Never Take Candy from a Stranger (1960) -- You want to talk about creepy, you want to talk about this film.  The beginning of the film sets the stage perfectly.  It's a very unsettling opening to a picture.  From there, the film presents what to do about what has happened.  The final act solves it for us.  For a film in 1960, this is a strong one in terms of content.  What's the subject matter?  A creepy, old rich man and two preteen girls.  You can use your imagination from there.

 

I can't believe i never heard of this movie.  I like creepy movies from the 1960s.  is it on youtube?
 

3. Diamonds Are Forever (1971) -- This is my least favorite of the Bond films I have watched but I still like it enough to place it ahead of other films.  I'm not sure why, though.  I guess my liking Bond films and my liking Sean Connery as Bond are the biggest reasons why.  I did find Sean to be funny in this one.  But the entire story and its undertaking was rather weak for Bond.

 

I only saw it once and disliked it.  I think that's the one with Natalie Wood's sister, Lana, right?  My friend's fiance was married once to one of the other "Bond girls" in this movie, too.  I feel like there is an element of "sleaze" that creeps in the 70s bond films, bringing down the tone and overall quality of the scripts.
 

5. Lady and the Tramp (1955) -- Life on the leash!  Interestingly enough, I watched Out of Africa and Adventure before I watched this one and all three films featured a male fearing a settled (captive) life and a female wanting her man to live such a life with her.  The iconic spaghetti scene between Lady and "Tramp" is still magical to me.  It's such a lovely scene.  There's a later scene that is quite risque.  It leads to a litter.  I really enjoy the look of these classic Disney films.

 

It's a classic.  I would like to see it again, especially for the "We Are Si-A-Mese, If you Please" routine. ;)

 

 

6. The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad (1949) -- My entire basis of what the Headless Horseman should look like stems from this Disney film.  I love the look of him in this picture.  I also enjoy this telling of "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow".  I like Bing Crosby being our narrator and Ichabod.  Love the songs and Bing singing them.  I also enjoy the humor.  "The Wind of the Willows" story is much less appealing to me, but I did enjoy Basil Rathbone's narration and Eric Blore's "Mr. Toad".  The showdown at the castle was done quite well.
 

Now this I would like to see!  I only know the Sleepy Hollow cartoon that used to be shown every year around this time, which I think is quite good.  The horseman in that always scared me.  Is this one scarier? 

 

7. Dumbo (1941) -- What a trippy film with a strong motherly kick.  The cruelty of people.  I mean, elephants.  The film ends up being a great lesson in accepting differences.  But Society never makes this easy.  I love how Dumbo is drawn, particularly his facial expressions.  You can just feel his sadness and loneliness.  The scenes with the crows and "pink elephants" are wild.  I was not expecting any of it.  It was a loving ride that I enjoyed.

 

I haven't seen Dumbo since I was a child.  I remember I had a book of it, too, and the picture of Dumbo up on that platform used to scare me (a lot of things used to scare me, lol).  I heard that this is a pretty "serious" film for a Disney cartoon, mostly for the themes you mention.   Wasn't it the last cartoon flick they did for a long time, too?
 

9. Bad Blonde (The Story of Miss Goddess) (1953) -- Of the Hammer films noir that I have watched thus far, this has been the one I have liked most.  It's fairly similar to The Postman Always Rings Twice.  Miss G (Barbara Payton) is married to an older gentleman but likes to have her fun with the younger fellas.  Her latest victim is Charlie (John Slater), a young boxer who has the chance to make it big.  What she ends up doing to get Charlie to do her bidding is rather sensational for the time.  This leads to some stunning moments.  Barbara sizzles in this one.

 

Where on earth did you find this one?  I don't remember seeing it when I was going through all the Hammer noirs via ClassicFlix.  I will try to rent it again.  Maybe I just forgot.

 

 

12. The Walking Dead (1936) -- A rather unique film that combines the gangster and horror genres quite nicely.  Boris Karloff is wrongly accused and ends up frying for it.  But is he completely dead?  Welcome to horror.  Karloff is out for revenge and how he exacts this revenge is interesting.  What really helps elevate this film are the cast of baddies.  You get Ricardo Cortez, Barton MacLane, and Joe Sawyer.  They are all excellent.  Kindly Edmund Gwenn plays the doctor who helps aid Karloff.  This is a quality Karloff flick.

 

I remember this one.  It was all that you say.  One of his better films of this period.

 

 

13. You'll Find Out (1940) -- Why I don't like 30s horror comedies but I like those from the 40s is a bit of a mystery to me.  Maybe because the comedy is more in the foreground in the 40s.  But this is my kind of comedic horror film.  And it surely doesn't hurt to have three masters teaming up.  Those being Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, and Peter Lorre.  Of the three, Bela is the one who shines the most.  He's exceptional.  I believe this is my first Kay Kyser film and I pretty much liked him.  I liked "Ish Kabibble" the very most, though.  He was a riot.

 

I'm afraid a little Kyser goes a long way with me.  He's like the other Kaye, Danny, for me.  A bit too manic.  But it is entertaining.  I've watched it on TCM twice I think.

 

15. The Jungle Book (1967) -- After watching the wonderful live-action version of this story earlier this year, I came to this version with some expectations.  My expectations weren't met.  I found this offering to be much less.  Still, I enjoyed it enough because of Baloo (Phil Harris), George Sanders, and the songs.

 

i loved George as the tiger.  but i confess i have never been crazy about this story for some reason.  i read the Kipling story (or was it a poem?) and have seen Sabu's version.  none of them really got to me and i usually go for any kind of animal flick.  but i'm not all that crazy about the Tarzan pictures, either.  something about these "nature boys" doesn't really click with me, ha ha.

 

 

16. 101 Dalmations (1961) -- Thank goodness for Cruella de Vil (Betty Lou Gerson)!  She makes the film for me.  The puppies and their plight aren't nearly as interesting to me as Cruella.  I do like some of the supporting characters, such as the Colonel (J. Pat O'Malley).

 

I do like this movie, but I agree with you that the reasons are mostly nothing to do with the pups.  I like the opening the best, how the couple meet in the park.  cute.  i like that it's English, too, instead of being set in America.

 

 

17. Come Live with Me (1941) -- Jimmy and Hedy!  Woohoo!  This isn't a particularly funny or special kind of romantic comedy, but I found it charming because of Jimmy.  Jimmy is always so darn good.  Hedy is stunning.  She's as beautiful as they come.  That makes her very likable with me.  Like many comedies from this time, there is a goofy item or phrase that unites our reluctant couple.  I liked it quite a bit.  The gist of the story is that Hedy needs to find a man to marry to avoid deportation.  Jimmy, a penniless writer, is her man.  To complicate matters, Hedy is in love with a married man, played by Ian Hunter.  As only Hollywood would have it, Ian is also a publisher.

 

I don't care for this one.  I think I like Jimmy better as an angry neurotic. :rolleyes:

 

 

18. The Doctor Takes a Wife (1940) -- While watching this film, I could sense the modern woman gagging.  What starts off as a film speaking for feminism ends up with a woman looking to wait on her man, hand and foot.  That aside, I enjoyed this one.  I greatly enjoyed Loretta Young's disgust and jealousy and the snappy wisecracks those feelings created.  She's especially funny when making fun of the snobby Gail Patrick, who is wonderful in the film.  Ray Milland is also quite enjoyable, playing the male chauvinist pig professor/doctor.  One of my favorite scenes has Ray bouncing back and forth between apartments, trying to appease Gail and the brass from the university.  It reminded me of one of my favorite shows, Three's Company.

 

I have definitely NOT seen this one.  I was thinking of Glenn Ford's THE DOCTOR AND THE GIRL.  You can watch it on YouTube:

It may have shown on TCM this month for Janet's spotlight, too.

 

Loretta's post 1930s work can be very hit and miss for me.  And I have never really cared for her in comedies for some reason.
 

23. Heat Wave (1954) -- This is another "The Postman Always Rings Twice" type of film.  The strength of the story has to be the woman and Hillary Brooke is quite good in this role.  She brings it.  Alex Nicol plays the younger man, a struggling writer, and Sidney James plays the older husband who knows how disloyal his young wife is.  But he doesn't fight it.  Nicol and James actually strike up a friendship and this creates an interesting emotional landscape for later in the film.  James is superb.  The ending isn't the best, thus the lower ranking for me.

 

 

I'm not sure if I've seen this one.  It's Hammer noir?  These films are enjoyable but I confess not terribly memorable.  I do like Hillary Brooke though I think of her more as a 1930s actress.

 

25. Man Bait (1952) -- George Brent and Diana Dors?  Really?  Uh-oh.  Brent is up against it financially and is considering some crazy things to collect on insurance.  The thing is, someone else has an eye on his insurance money, too.  Enter Diana.  Now do you think everyone is going to find a happy ending in this kind of film?  The entire set-up for the film is pretty good.  And there are some high moments to be found, too.  But the picture doesn't finish strongly, and this drags it down for me.  Diana is worth seeing.  She's good.

 

 

Is this the one where he plays the owner of a bookshop?

 

I like diana.  I watched an old TV interview with her once and liked her from that before I'd seen any of her movies.  She was a very bright, witty woman.

 

 

26. The Devil Bat (1940) -- I need to hook my new computer up so I can take some caps.  I'd take some of this one.  The bats in this Bela Lugosi horror flick are a trip.  And if you are someone who enjoys cheesy effects, you'll like this one.  I pretty much enjoyed the film because of the ridiculous premise and Bela.  Lugosi is crazy and good.  This is how I like him.  Those surrounding him are bland.  But that means nothing when you get Bela being Bela.

 

I know I've seen it but I don't remember it.  Are the bats up to par with bird in THE GIANT CLAW?  Bronxie needs to weigh in on this one!
 

27. Stolen Face (1952) -- I was very excited to watch this film because of Lizabeth Scott.  My hopeful expectations were soon brought down by a hit-and-miss script.  The story itself is on the strange side, as a plastic surgeon (Paul Henreid) decides to remake a scarred woman into the woman who spurned him years ago.  What's with Paul and plastic surgery?!  In some ways, this is a horror film noir since Paul is basically playing a mad scientist.  The twist in the film doesn't make it interesting.  It all becomes frustrating by film's end.

 

I saw this one not too long ago, and again, I have completely blanked out on the whole thing.  Yes, Paul went through a streak of plastic surgery gone awry flicks for some weird reason.

 

 

28. Maniac (1963) -- The best part of this film is the opening.  It starts with a serious bang.  It sets the mood well.  Then we fall into an interesting love triangle between a traveler (Kerwin Mathews), a mother (Nadia Gray), and a daughter (Liliane Brousse).  That was rather fascinating.  But then it goes over a cliff with an ending that is extremely weak.

 

I'm sure I remember this one....tell me more about it.  is it on youtube?

 

 

29. The Snorkel (1958) -- More Hammer horror.  And, once again, this one starts out exceptionally well.  It's quiet and haunting.  Then it becomes an exercise in believing a young girl or not.  It's similar to Gaslight, in this regard.  The ending is tongue in cheek.  It's very much a wink.

 

I really liked this movie!  I know it's weird but A) I love movies set in the South of France, even bad ones B) I love the mood and tone.  I didn't like the ending, though.

 

30. The Cobweb (1955) -- Is there anything more ludicrous than drapes as a key plot point?  Drapes?!  I surely hope Vincente Minnelli was mocking psychiatry with this one.  If it's serious... oh boy.  Thank goodness for Gloria Grahame.  Gloria was absolutely wonderful in this film.  Even though she's the evildoer in this one, she's still the most likable one!  What an interesting cast: Richard Widmark, Charles Boyer, Lauren Bacall, Lillian Gish, and Oscar Levant.  I found Susan Strasberg to be very cute in this one, too.  But those drapes!  Unbelievable!
 

Oscar was the only one I liked.

 

31. Blackout (1954) -- This is one of those "in a daze" films noir.  Dane Clark is our drunken hero, a down-and-out artist who is offered $500 to marry a woman he's never met before.  Does he?  He sure can't remember.  To make things worse, his wife is nowhere to be found and he's implicated in a murder.  The set-up is good, but the execution isn't.  The film plays very ordinary and is mostly unrewarding.
 

The best thing about it was it kept me unsure about the woman until the end.  I couldn't tell if she was going to turn out bad or good.  I'm not big on Dane.

 

32. The Unguarded Hour (1936) -- Blackmail is the name of the game in this solid effort.  Loretta Young is the wife of Franchot Tone, a district attorney riding high.  The only problem is Franchot has a past and Henry Daniell lets Loretta know about it.  It's now up to Loretta to protect her husband's good name.  Nothing ever goes wrong when you do that.  The premise is better than its undertaking, but the film is very watchable.

 

I've never heard of this film!  Where are you finding these???  Again at first I thought you meant another movie: The Unguarded Moment (Esther Williams).

 

33. Terror Street (1953) -- Dan Duryea in film noir is almost always a winning combination with me.  Not in this one.  While Duryea is quite good, this story is lackluster.  As the story goes, Dan finds himself in a frame-up and he has 36 hours to clear his name.  That's the good.  Dan's journey to prove himself can be tedious at times.  We spend a good deal of time with him and a young woman (Elsie Albiin), as the two of them strike up a relationship.  This really slows the film and eliminates the tension.  The picture never recovers.

 

I mostly enjoyed it but I don't remember much.  I think my favorite of these hammer noirs that I can recall was the one with Anne Baxter and the one with George Brent playing the bookshop owner and Diana Dors as the unlikely bookshop employee.

 

34. Third Finger, Left Hand (1940) -- Sometimes you feel like Melvyn Douglas, sometimes you don't. I wasn't going for him in this one.  I also didn't go for Myrna Loy too much, which is shocking.  It must be the script.  Myrna is the editor of a magazine that pretends to have a husband as a form of job security.  Melvyn takes a fancy to Myrna and soon discovers her guise.  He uses this to his advantage and the silliness of a romantic comedy ensues.  I'm usually pretty forgiving with these kind of films, but I just couldn't get into this one.

 

I agree, it's a failure on both sides (actors) for me.  It feels rather leaden.
 

35. Crossroads (1942) -- William Powell and Hedy Lamarr in an amnesia crime film?  Sounds good to me!  I was duped.  It's not.  Bill and Hedy are a newly-married couple who find themselves entrapped by Bill's past.  The problem is, Bill suffered amnesia years ago and he has no idea who he really is and what he did.  Could he actually be a murderer?  This could pose a problem with his pursuit of being an ambassador.  The film is rather slow and tidy.

 

I don't like either of the films Powell made with Hedy.  they have no chemistry.

 

 

36. The Deadly Game (1954) -- A mostly uninteresting Hammer film noir starring Lloyd Bridges.  Bridges gets himself mixed up in the middle of a murder case and it's up to him to figure out who is really behind this murder.  The key seems to be an envelope he was asked to deliver by the deceased.  Who wants this envelope and why?  Finlay Currie is the best thing about the film.
 

37. Paid to Kill (1954) -- Dane Clark stars in this Hammer film noir about a guy who hires a hit man to knock him off so that his wife can collect on a life insurance policy.  A development throws everything off.  Clark is an actor that can run hot and cold with me.  He's mostly likable in this film, but the story isn't.

 

The plot of the latter reminds me of one of the "Whistler" movies.  These movies are really enjoyable while you're watching, but they aren't that good and quite forgettable.  Yet I'm glad to watch them whenever they are on!

 

 

40. The Gambler and the Lady (1952) -- Yet another Hammer film noir starring Dane Clark.  This one finds Dane as a gangster who is looking for refinement.  My Fair Gambler?  Pretty much.  Clark wants to be a legit businessman but the arrival of a competing gangster forces his hand.  The film's uneven feel dragged it down for me.

 

 

Another movie I confused with a totally different film (with Greer Garson!).  this one I'm sure I've never seen.  That's too many Dane Clarks!!  And not his best by a long shot.

 

 

42. The Secret of Madame Blanche (1933) -- Another version of the "Madame X" story.  Irene Dunne plays the titular role here and she does just fine.  What I liked most about the film is the beginning, where two dramatic events occur that completely change Irene's fate.  Lionel Atwill plays the intrusive father-in-law who puts everything in motion.  He eventually fades into the background.  The final act features a new spin on the "Madame X" story.  It's a not bad one, either.

 

It's scary that you're coming up with 1930s movies I never heard of!!

 

 

43. White Cliffs of Dover (1940) -- Ugh!  I was very bored watching this one.  I do not like films that cover the life of a character and then throw big events at you.  One minute a baby is born, the next the father is killed, the next the grandparents are dead.  That stuff drives me nuts.  The setting is also a troublesome area for me.  I'm not big on the stiff British fare.  Then toss in the "rally around the flag" of the day and I'm jumping off the White Cliffs of Dover.

 

Pip! Pip! :D

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I thank you very much for your kind words and good wishes.

 

It feels very much as if it is the end of an era of restraint and endless waiting.

 

May I add my congratulations, Mrs. C?!!  I'm very happy for you both.

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I'm going to watch this film fairly soon:

 

 

Framed is pretty good.

 

OH.. and PS: please do list your contemporary ones.. maybe I have seen some of them too! :) ha.. maybe.. (have you ever seen Hugo?? I think  you would REALLLLLYYYY like that film a LOT.. maybe.. perhaps.. possibly.. I think) :D

 

There's about 25 contemporary films that I have watched and I'd guess you have seen half of them.  I'll look into Hugo.

 

I wanted to see Hugo but never did.  I wonder if it's on Netflix.

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Well ALOHA, little Island Girl!! :)

 

Aloha, Kansas City Kath!

 

don't even get me started on the '97 movie.

 

Ha.. we are on the mountain together for sure, kid. I still remember how grueling it was just sitting there in the theater waiting.. and waiting.. and waiting.. ha. There were "moments' here and there that were pretty good, I do confess. The special effects were ALL they said and more. So for an FX junkie like me.. it was pretty well done, I admit. But UGH.. to wrap such an amazing human tragedy as this into one huge "love fest" movie.. agh. (and don't get me wrong.. I like a good love story now and then) but they really went.. well.. too far. (so very, very, very.. too far) 

 

They went "overboard" with the lovers when all I wanted was the lovers to jump overboard, ha. 

 

It doesn't help that I do not like that actor who played the lead.  Gloria Stuart is the only one I liked.

 

I agree.. and I have seen several (feature film and made for tv too) I have seen the Barbara one. but boy, it's been a good long while. I think I remember enough of it to say I didn't like it nearly as well as ANTR, but not much of the details. didn't she have a couple of kids.. and a husband who was not too nice.. or was she the not too nice one.. ha I don't remember.. but i just recall there was some family conflict as a part of the story. 

 

 

Right the first time.  Clifton plays one of his uber-snobs and their daughter is turning out to be just like him.  He's got his reasons, though.

 

I just saw that! Another stroke of genius! :) I hope to have the chance to revisit some Pappy movies soon. (This Spring, I am going to be teaching a pre-teen/teenage " Introduction to Classic Film" club as a part of a group that the kidling belongs to (ha.. be worried..  be very worried.. ME.. teaching anyone about classic film.. agh!)  and I am already sorting through a variety of movies and trying to get a nice variety of genres to hopefully appeal to a broad range of "teenage minds" ha. Oh me.. what WAS I thinking for signing up for THAT??) Anyway.. I am hoping to use at least one (or two) Fordies as a part of that class.. so I'll be rewatching some of them to see what might fit our agenda. It will be fun to have a place to chat on them all with you again here too. :)

 

thanks.  :) no rush, of course.   i'm only sorry i haven't followed up with it until now.

 

i think that it is so very exciting that you're going to do a classic film appreciation class!!!  you are a very good teacher and you write and express yourself extremely well about these movies, so I'm sure your enthusiasm will carry over.  you won't "talk over their heads" about things that don't matter if their interest isn't aroused.  one can talk till they're blue in the face about the "importance" of film history but that's meaningless if the audience is bored.  once they get past any awkwardness about "old movies" or black-and white, I'm sure you'll have some new young fans on your hands.

 

I have to admit that I had to grow up to appreciate John Ford's movies, except for Mogambo.  That one I loved from the start.  I'll be curious if your students are smarter about them---I'm sure they will be!

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