Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
hlywdkjk

The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

Recommended Posts

1. Ruggles of Red Gap (1935) -- This one got off to a slow start with me, but once Ruggles (Charles Laughton) is called "Colonel" by Egbert (Charles Ruggles), I was all about it.  And as good as Laughton is in this film, it was Charlie Ruggles who consistently made me laugh and enjoy the film.  He livened up every moment he was on screen.  Then add Maude Eburne's "Ma" and I'm laughing quite a bit.  Mary Boland was also terrific in a very "Mary" role and Zasu Pitts was sweet as the meek "Prunella".  I felt the film played as a raucous, western version of My Man Godfrey.  And, boy, is that ever a good thing.  For he's a jolly good fella!

 

2. Cash on Demand (1961) -- A very surprising Hammer "horror" film that has a unique spin on Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol".  The star of the show is Peter Cushing, who delivers a marvelous performance as a "Scrooge".  Matching Cushing every step of the way is Andre Morell.  He is thoroughly entertaining.  The film is very minimalist and plays a bit like an Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode.  The lights are clearly shining on the performers and script.

 

3. Enchantment (1948) -- What a lovely film this is.  It features a nice mix of happiness and melancholy.  I absolutely loved seeing the generational love, both the good and the bad.  Loved the cast.  David Niven, Teresa Wright, Jayne Meadows, Evelyn Keyes, and Farley Granger are all inviting to me.  The emotional flow within the film is quite good.  The ups and downs hit the mark.  I thought the ending was very rewarding.  It reminded me of The Age of Innocence.

 

4. Conflict (1945) -- I was not expecting to see Bogie play this kind of character so soon after his early-40s triumphs.  It fell right in line with what post-war America in Hollywood would come to be.  Quite the change in tone.  The desperate creepiness of Bogie's "Richard Mason" is palpable.  What he does is frighteningly cold-hearted, especially for Bogie.  The eventual "Gaslighting" of him had me guessing some.  The role reversal also applies to Sydney Greenstreet, who plays a good guy in this one.  A surprising little thriller.

 

5. High Wall (1947) -- This is another surprise film noir for me.  Robert Taylor plays the lead, a returning soldier who suffers from some brain damage that causes spats of memory loss.  He ends up being accused of murder and finds himself in a mental institution.  Audrey Totter plays a doctor who starts to believe in Taylor's innocence.  What makes this film is Taylor.  He's excellent in playing a desperate father who is up against a doubting system.  The resolution to the film isn't the best, but the claustrophobic feel is quite good.

 

6. Carrie (1952) -- I mostly enjoyed this variation of "Madame Bovary", Wyler's other picture, The Heiress, and A Star Is Born.  While the film starts off focusing on the titular character, played by Jennifer Jones, it ultimately turns its eye towards Laurence Olivier, the older man "Carrie" falls in love with.  And it is Olivier's tortured performance that lifts this film to greater heights.  He's exceptional.  Jennifer is also quite lovely.  She does a fine job of portraying the different phases of Carrie's life.  You really get a good sense of journey.  Eddie Albert also plays a good character in the film.  One that fits him like a glove.  But poor Miriam Hopkins is stuck playing a horrid character!

 

7. Indiscretion of an American Wife (1953) -- The meshing of Hollywood with Italian neo-realism doesn't work wholly but it still proves to be rather fascinating.  To see Montgomery Clift and Jennifer Jones, two American stars with a clean image, thrust into the dirty world of realism and affairs was both jarring and appealing.  Where this film and the similar Brief Encounter depart drastically is the emotional depth.  This one lacks it.  This one is more of a passion play with attempts at emotion.  I feel Brief Encounter is the stronger film but this one tends to play more to me.

 

 

 

8. Cry 'Havoc' (1943) -- A film about women serving as nurses in the Pacific theater during World War II is one that I usually dread watching.  I should know better.  Especially when the cast features Ann Sothern, Joan Blondell, and Ella Raines.  This one is quite good.  Ann is sensational.  She steals the show.  And thanks to Jackie, I now have a thing for Ann.  She's a pip.  Joan isn't as front and center as I expected her to be.  Ella is pretty interesting in this one.  I thought she would be overpowered by the other stars, but she's given a memorable character.  Margaret Sullavan is the star and her character seems to fit Margaret's "breeding".  She's also good in the film.  The rest of the cast is just as good.  Marsha Hunt, Frances Gifford, and Connie Gilchrist are the names that stand out to me.  The film is both funny and dramatic.  It's a great mix.  This one screams "Quiet Gal".

 

9. Ruby Gentry (1952) -- This King Vidor offering felt like a backwoods retelling of his earlier Duel in the Sun.  It's not as compelling or sweeping as Duel in the Sun, but it does have its merits.  And the primary merit is Jennifer Jones, who plays the title role.  She's a spitfire in this one!  And she's a scheming spitfire.  Charlton Heston is the object of her desire.  The obnoxious comes easy for Heston, so it's a role that really works for him.  Karl Malden is playing his older, rich man in love in this one, and he does so with aplomb.  I ended up categorizing this film as "film noir" because of its ending.

 

10. The Caine Mutiny (1954) -- I wasn't into this film for the first half, but the second half comes on very strong, making the first half well worth it.  How everything is turned upside down by film's end is terrific.  My sympathies bounced all over the place.  The finished product had me feeling sorry for everyone.  Amazing!  Humphrey Bogart is the star and target in this one, as he plays "Lt. Commander Queeg".  Is he a crazy, power-hungry commander of a ship?  That's what Fred MacMurray, Van Johnson, and the unknown Robert Francis start to believe.  Loved all the main performers in the film.  Jose Ferrer's late appearance is a strong and memorable one.  A good film.

 

11. These Are the Damned (1963) -- A Hammer film that starts off as an early version of A Clockwork Orange that strangely veers off into a sci-fi/horror Cold War allegory.  And amongst all this is an older man/younger woman love story.  Sounds like a mess.  And it is rather messy.  Having said that, I was rather fascinated by it.  MacDonald Carey plays the older man, Shirley Anne Field is the young woman, Oliver Reed is the crazed British youth, and Viveca Lindfors plays a memorable side character.  Joseph Losey is the director.  Boy, does he make some interesting films.  This is definitely one of them.  The song that is sung at the beginning is wild and catchy.  Jackie may go for this one.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3H4Y52vrPg

 

12. The Court Jester (1955) -- The Danny Kaye films that I have seen, I have liked.  And each has been consistent in what I like and what doesn't play well with me.  I like Danny as a comedic actor.  I think he's superb.  What I don't like is the singing.  That tends to grate on me.  As for this particular film, I really enjoyed it.  A strong cast is a big reason why.  I loved Angela Lansbury as "Princess Gwendolyn".  Basil Rathbone is always a treat as a villain.  And Mildred Natwick is given a really fun role.  The scene when Danny is put under a spell by Mildred is absolutely hilarious.  Easily my favorite bit in the film.  I also loved the running gag between Danny and Basil.  "Get it? Got it. Good."

 

13. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939) -- I was really enjoying this film until the end.  For some reason, the finale just didn't do it for me.  I'm not sure why, either.  What I did like about the film was the various interactions and storylines.  Cedric Hardwicke's "Frollo" was rather Shakespearean, and I felt he was the most compelling of characters.  He had his hands on everything.  Charles Laughton, of course, is exceptional as "Quasimodo".  I was thinking I would be more emotionally wrapped up in his character, but I wasn't.  I think that's why the film didn't win me over.  Maureen O'Hara is gorgeous in the film.  Thomas Mitchell plays a character that certainly suits him.  His fate was interesting.  Edmond O'Brien, as others have noted, is young and vibrant in a heroic, romantic role.  Very surprising to see.

 

14. The Sea Hawk (1940) -- Errol Flynn was such a force of nature.  Even though the films he stars in during this time of his career are not my kind of films, his great charisma and pure energy wins me over.  He truly was a star unlike any other.  One of the reasons why I liked this film more than some of his other "swashies" was Flora Robson.  I just love her as "Queen Elizabeth".  I think she's wonderful.  Claude Rains is on the "other side" but I never felt he was villainous.  Henry Daniell, on the other hand, is once again up to no good.  That's a welcome sight.  My favorite scene in the film is when Flynn and his crew are captured and forced to escape Gilbert Roland's galley.

 

15. I Bury the Living (1958) -- If you like silly, off-beat kind of horror films, then this is one you'll like.  I know I did.  And, yes, Snippy, you need to watch it for your Richard Boone.  He's killing folks!  Or is he?  It's silly and ludicrous but so much fun.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbpa_jd_ezE

 

16. The Suspect (1944) -- Robert Siodmak really carved out an underappreciated niche in the mid-to-late-40s with sophisticated thrillers.  This particular thriller plays a lot like an episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents.  It's highly ironic.  And to make this film even more interesting is when I watched it.  To have seen Charles Laughton in this film alongside recent viewings of Ruggles of Red Gap and The Hunchback of Notre Dame makes it even better.  Laughton was such a great talent.  And look who is back for more shenanigans!  It's Jackie's guy, Henry Daniell!  Ahhh, what a weasel.  As for the film itself, I thought it was very solid.  I'd place it in the middle of Siodmak's thrillers.  Ella Raines is simply along for the ride in this one.

 

 

 

17. Song of India (1949) -- As stories and films go, this one isn't terribly strong.  But since I'm such a fan of Gail Russell and now Sabu, this one hits the spot.  Like many of these films, it's about the white man disturbing the peace of the jungle.  Here, they are seeking to capture the animals.  Sabu is a prince who fights off the invaders.  In a twist of fates, he ends up capturing Gail.  This enrages the man who desires her, played by the underrated Turhan Bey.  This is escapist fare elevated by the wonderful Gail and Sabu.

 

18. The Bad Seed (1956) -- A Quiet Gal fave that I finally got to.  I was not expecting to find the kind of film this was.  I was completely expecting a straightforward thriller.  I had no idea this was a play.  My feelings with the film went up and down.  I was cold with it and then I was hot with it.  Then I'd turn cold, then hot.  By film's end, I ended up liking it.  It kind of had a Shadow of a Doubt feel, in a way.  What I loved about the film is the sociological aspects of it.  I loved how blind the majority of the characters were.  They only saw what they wanted to see.  This was especially true with Monica (Evelyn Varden).  Loved her character.  I also enjoyed Hortense (Eileen Heckart).  Whenever either of them were around, I liked the film.  One thing that I found fascinating was darling Rhoda's (Patty McCormack) protecting Leroy (Henry Jones) at certain times.  That was strange and interesting.  I love how the film made "basket full of kisses" absolutely sickening.

 

19. The Lawless (1950) -- One of the best things about Joseph Losey is that he often made socially-conscious films.  This is certainly no different.  The premise to this film is good, but the execution is just a bit short.  The story is about a Mexican youth in a border town who gets up caught in a violent situation that leads to a manhunt for him.  The white part of town and the brown part of town are at odds here.  There is a different kind of twist in the film that doesn't make both sides simply good and bad.  Gail Russell plays a Mexican newspaper editor.  Uh-huh.  It's very far-fetched.  MacDonald Carey plays the big-shot editor of the big paper in town.  It's a middling film but with a daring message for its time.

 

20. Framed (1947) -- Poor Glenn Ford.  He runs into some of the worst luck.  Lucky for him, he's bailed out of a jam by an angel of a woman, Miss G, played by Janis Carter.  From there, a love affair develops and nothing but happiness ensues.  I think that's what happens.  This is film noir, after all.  Nothing but happy endings!

 

 

 

21. Major Dundee (1965) -- You can actually see the skeleton of The Wild Bunch in this earlier Sam Peckinpah film.  It almost plays very similarly.  It's nowhere near as good, though.  At times, the film was bordering on laborious.  Charlton Heston was a big reason why, as both Jackie and Miss G commented on.  Thankfully, Richard Harris offset Heston's seriousness with his rascally behavior.  But who I liked the very most was James Coburn as Heston's right-hand man, "Sam".  He was fantastic.

 

22. Chandu on Magic Island (1935) -- I really like the earlier Chandu the Magician film, so I was very interested to see this one.  My enthusiasm was quickly dampened by a big change.  In this offering, Bela Lugosi is our hero, not the villain.  It doesn't work nearly as well.  The setting is what I like with 30s horror films.  We are smack dab in the middle of a cat worshiping kingdom.  Excellent!  Mood trumps story, which works for me with horror.

 

 

 

23. The Beast of the City (1932) -- What I liked the most about this film was the ending.  It's a terrific finish.  The rest of the film just weighed on me.  While I did like Jean Harlow and her scenes with the youthful Wallace Ford, the film as a whole just didn't push me in a good direction.  I usually love Walter Huston, but even he couldn't win me over.  I just didn't sense any kind of energy.  It felt sluggish for a gangster pic.

 

24. Casanova Brown (1944) -- I wasn't looking forward to watching this one because I thought it was going to be a dry drama.  I had no idea it was a screwball comedy!  That perked me up right away.  At first, I was worried about the direction the film was going.  But the moment Gary Cooper receives a letter from a woman (Teresa Wright) saying he's the father of her child, all the while he's on the verge of marrying another woman (Anita Louise), I was hooked.  Talk about risque!  So the scenario is certainly screwy.  Was it funny?  I thought a good deal of it was humorous.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhYbVzCgSfU

 

25. Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942) -- A funny thing happened to me with this film.  It was actually the songs and "feel good" nature of the film that had me liking it by film's end.  I'd say for the majority of the film, I wasn't thrilled with it.  I'm not one to like musicals or biopics or films that take part in show business.  Those are deadly with me.  But I ended liking some of the songs and I also liked George M. Cohan and his family.  I even liked the patriotism!  Shocking!  James Cagney is brilliant in as "George M. Cohan".  It's jaw-dropping to see all that he does in this picture.  He certainly won me over.  The final act of the film is terrific, really.  I loved the gestures he did for his family and his father.  I loved his "thanks you" sign-offs.  Very touching.  It's a really good film about family.

 

26. The Naughty Nineties (1945) -- In terms of story, this wasn't one of my favorite Abbott & Costello pictures.  The plot is barely passable and interesting.  But when it comes to Abbott & Costello and their skits, this one could be the best.  The film featuring "Who's on First?" in its entirety makes it special.  There are other skits in the film that are also excellent.  The dream sequence is one that stood out to me.

 

27. The Vampire Bat (1933) -- Is that really Melvyn Douglas in a vampire film?!  I can't believe it!  And Melvyn is looking to smooch Fay Way!  That was great.  Melvyn is a doubter of the apparent vampire killings in town.  Can he prove he's right?  One of the best things about this film are the three leads being quality performers.  You've got Melvyn, Fay, and Lionel Atwill.  That's a nice mix.  But the guy who takes the cake (and fruit) in this one is horror's local loon, Dwight Frye.  He's exceptional.  He is crazy and highly entertaining.

 

 

 

28. 13 West Street (1962) -- Darn those kids!  What makes this film somewhat interesting is that you can feel the changing of the wind.  You've got the 50s sensibilities worrying to death over the reckless 60s taking over.  Alan Ladd represents the 50s and a bunch of rich thugs represent the 60s.  Ladd feels the law isn't protecting his rights, so he decides to seek his own justice.  The premise sounds much better than its undertaking.  The film just doesn't reach a high enough level with the terror that films of its kind were doing at the same time.  Rod Steiger is playing the "Law".  You guessed it.  Rod is very "Rod".

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bSdND13L5E

 

29. Stop Me Before I Kill! (1960) -- There is a definite creepiness found in this Hammer horror.  Race car driver Alan Colby (Ronald Lewis) is struggling to cope with a car accident that occurred away from the track.  It involved his bride (Diane Cilento).  Both survive the accident but he now has urges to kill her.  A chance meeting with a shrink (Claude Dauphin) brings about some hidden feelings.  It gets messy and convoluted from there.  I thought the film was going to be a good psychological thriller but it loses its promise halfway through.  The ending was disappointing.

 

30. The Man in the Net (1959) -- The beginning of this film completely fascinated me.  It featured a wreckage of people, highlighted by Carolyn Jones, who was summoning Bette Davis.  Boy, was she ever a trip.  But things change fairly quickly and the film goes in a direction that I just didn't care for.  Namely, the kids.  Ugh!  The conclusion to the film also drove me batty.  It was way too easy.  Even Charles McGraw couldn't save it for me.

 

31. Just This Once (1952) -- Mark MacLene (Peter Lawford) is reckless playboy who is spending his trust fund wildly.  He's headed to the poor house unless someone can keep his frivolous spending in line.  Enter lawyer Lucy Duncan (Janet Leigh).  Can she reign him in?  This lighthearted comedy couldn't reign me in.  I liked Peter and his carefree way but I didn't go for the comedy or story.  The ending wasn't to my liking.  Janet is beautiful but playing a bothersome character.

 

32. Gambling Lady (1934) -- I wanted to like this one more than I did.  It's got a naive Joel McCrea looking to win the heart of the wise and worldly Barbara Stanwyck.  McCrea is the son of a rich man on the right side of town and Barbara is the son of gambler from the wrong side.  The mismatch is what you'd expect.  What they encounter throughout is entertaining enough but something is missing from this one.

 

33. Woman Wanted (1935) -- Sweet Maureen O'Sullivan is headed to prison for a crime she didn't commit but that's not the only problem she faces.  The Mob is after her.  An unknowing Joel McCrea gets caught up in the middle of this mess and ends up on the lam with Maureen.  The blending of comedy, romance, and gangster is actually pretty good in this one.  The film is definitely more on the light side, though.  It's sweet and silly.

 

34. Swing High, Swing Low (1937) -- A very odd film that goes from light comedy to heavy drama in a blink.  As Movieman aptly points out, hence the title.  The first half of the film is mostly fun.  Fred MacMurray is a boisterous trumpet player stuck in the Army who runs into Carole Lombard, a singer on vacation.  The two butt heads but eventually come together and are invited to be a musical act together.  From there, things get dramatic.  My issue with the film was how all of this is pieced together.  It's jarring and abrupt versus gradual.  The major "event" in the film that creates problems just didn't work me.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIJdLcErR_k

 

35. Prisoners of the Casbah (1953) -- Gloria Grahame as an Arabian princess?  Gloria Grahame as an Arabian princess!  And Gloria features a lot of Miss G's characteristics in this one.  She's mighty snippy.  Especially to Turhan Bey, who has his issues with her.  If this sword-and-sandal picture sounds ridiculous, you would be right.  The plot and story are flimsy.  The action scenes with Bey are laughable.  But what it does have going for it is comedy, believe it or not.  The confrontations between Gloria and Turhan are actually funny.  So you've got a battle of the sexes comedy trapped inside a sword-and-sandal pic.

 

 

 

36. Funny Girl (1968) -- This one flipped the script on me.  I fully expected to be annoyed by Barbra Streisand and go for Omar Sharif's romanticism.  At first, that's how it was.  By the middle of the film, I liked Barbara more than Omar.  And by the film's end, I disliked Omar.  Very odd.  The focus turned to Omar in the second half and Fanny (Barbra) took a backseat.  I didn't like that.  This film is actually similar to Carrie and somewhat like A Star Is Born.  It has more energy than those two films because of Barbra.  She's really good in the film.  The woman can sing.  She's pretty funny, too.  She can be annoying, as well.  But I expect that with Barbra.  I liked her best at the beginning of the film.  Loved her rebellious nature.

 

37. A Dangerous Profession (1949) -- George Raft is a bond bailsman who finds himself attracted to the wife (Ella Raines) of a man who he has helped to post bail.  Things get really sticky when this fella ends up dead.  Who did it?  The Mrs.?  That makes love a little more complicated.  Raft and Pat O'Brien are hanging on at this point of their careers, but it's still nice to see them in films like this.  The script is nowhere as near interesting as the performers, sadly.

 

38. Ann Vickers (1933) -- I cannot believe how quickly Irene Dunne jumped in bed in this one!  My goodness!  If you're one who likes their feminism, this one could bother you by film's end.  I wasn't bothered by the ending.  But the film itself was a bit ragged.  I did like Irene.  Walter Huston plays a rascal, as he often does so well.  He was okay to me.  I liked Edna May Oliver a lot in this one.  Her womanly words of wisdom to Irene were right on the mark.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tG6bRhmW7xg

 

39. Good News (1947) -- Oh, Sweet T.  The torture you put me through!  At least there is football in this one.  Too bad it's a musical with football!  Ugh!  There were a couple songs that I liked in this one, such as "Lucky in Love" and "The Best Things in Life are Free".  But then there's "French Lesson"!  Noooooooooooooooooo!  I can't say that I went for June Allyson.  Maybe the more I see of her, I'll like her style.  That can happen with me.

 

40. A Woman Rebels (1936) -- This is Kate Hepburn's version of "Madame X".  It's easily my least favorite of the films that use that theme.  I found the ending to be maddening.

 

If I find some time later, I'll post some caps for some films.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hiya Mr. Grey,

 

I very much enjoyed reading your analysis of the films on your list. Woo HOO for Ruggles of Red Gap.. ha. I am so pleased you enjoyed it. You are right about the layers of fun characters in this one.. one just adds to the next.  (and good call on the comparison to My Man Godfrey.. very good!) 

 

Now you have me interested in:

2. Cash on Demand (1961) with this comment:  a unique spin on Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol".  The star of the show is Peter Cushing, who delivers a marvelous performance as a "Scrooge". 

 

Woo.. I am hooked. I DO love a good Dickens.. or even a "Dickens-like" story.. will have to look for this one for sure! 

 

3. Enchantment (1948) -- What a lovely film this is. 

 

I wish I could remember more of this one.. will have to go back and see if they still have it at the library.. but wow.. I am shocked (based only one what I THOUGHT I would recall of it) that you would rate it so high! 
 

8. Cry 'Havoc' (1943) -- A film about women serving as nurses in the Pacific theater during World War II...  This one screams "Quiet Gal".

 

I've been trying and trying to recall if I have seen it.. but I really don't think I  have. I didn't see it on youtube, so will have to see if I can find it. 
 

15. I Bury the Living (1958) -- If you like silly, off-beat kind of horror films, then this is one you'll like.  I know I did.  And, yes, Snippy, you need to watch it for your Richard Boone.  He's killing folks!  Or is he?  It's silly and ludicrous but so much fun.

 

I read  up on this one.. ha. It sounds very "twilight-zone-ish" I bet it is a lot of fun. (in a creepy sort of way) 


16. The Suspect (1944)  To have seen Charles Laughton in this film alongside recent viewings of Ruggles of Red Gap and The Hunchback of Notre Dame makes it even better.  

 

Wait!! I have seen this one. I overlooked it on your list the first time. I remember chatting on here (with.. hmm.. maybe Jackie.. possibly Miss G??) some time ago. It is a very good performance from Laughton (if memory serves) Ha. I bet that was quite a Charles Laughton film fest you had going on.. and very diverse roles for him in each)

 

As I recall (ha.. though not a Laughton)  this one also it makes a good pairing with The Strange Affair of Uncle Harry too. 


18. The Bad Seed (1956) -- A Quiet Gal fave that I finally got to. 

 

Woo Hoo. ha. At least its not at the TOTAL bottom of your list. :D I'll take somewhere in the mid-range. Ha. I think this is one of those films that in order to enjoy it as much as I do.. you have to like it for what it is.. rather than expect it to be something other than just for "fun" . 

 

One thing that I found fascinating was darling Rhoda's (Patty McCormack) protecting Leroy (Henry Jones) at certain times.  That was strange and interesting.  

 

Oh.. it was very "Cat and Mouse".... but also a bit of self-defense. If her mom HAD gone after him (especially in that one part.. where he was outside talking to her when she was having her "tea-party") then there would have been a lot of questions about what they were talking about, etc, etc.. and she didn't want THAT to happen. So she just let it drop. (You know.. Can't let mom get TOO many pieces of the puzzle. She MIGHT start to put two and two together and THEN the next thing you know, she'll make you drink pear juice and take your vitamins)  :D


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aloha, Pappy's Girl -- That is a wildly diverse group!  Too many musicals even for me, ha!

 

It's frightening!

 

Ann Vickers (1933) - Sorry Mrs. Sweet T, but Walter is the main pull for me in this movie.  I like it and mainly for their unconventional romance.  The rest of it doesn't interest me.  I have the book by the way, by Lewis (whom I generally enjoy), but ended up using it as a doorstop after reading it, ha.  Still, Barney is my kind of guy.

 

And now you use me as a doorstop! :D  It's definitely a pre-code kind of film with Irene's situations.  Barney (Walter Huston) is full of life, that's for sure.  He's devilish, too.  Definitely a "Walter Huston" character.  I liked Edna May Oliver in the film.  She had things figured out.

 

The Bad Seed (1956) - The ending soothes me every time I think of all the brats out there...

 

But you're a brat, Snippy Seed! :P  It's a stylish ending to a stagey film.

 

badseed1_zps6da8d5ba.jpg

 

The Beast of the City (1932) - I wasn't that thrilled with it but it's interesting.  The title made me expect more, ha.  Wallace and Edmond used to get the girl!

 

That was shocking to me!  Maybe there's still hope for me!  Then again. :D  The ending is very powerful.  One of the better ones you will see.  Jean Harlow was memorable in her smaller role.

 

The Caine Mutiny (1954) - Not a perfect film but the individual performances are pretty darn fascinating.  I can never see strawberries without thinking of Bogie (Ro's "tomato", ha).

 

I agree with your first comment.  It's really about the performances in this one.  Once Jose Ferrer shows up, it all comes together.

 

Carrie (1952) - Too heavy for me.  I like Olivier and love Jennifer but it's just so depressing all around.  Eddie Albert is the only character I like.

 

Eddie is a lot of fun.  He's the undependable rascal who just wants to have women when he wants and on his terms.  So we see what kind of guys you like! :P  I like seeing what happens to poor Larry.  He sacrifices so much for love.

 

Casanova Brown (1944) - Gad, just about the nadir for me of Gary's "cutesy" movies.  Gag, gag, gag....  :angry:  

But he sure looked gorgeous, darn it!

 

I liked it!  The plot device is rather risque: Coop is marrying Anita Louise but Teresa Wright is claiming he's the father of her child.  Wow!  Then, to make it more screwy, he's off to marry Mary Treen!

 

casanovabrown1_zps549c9769.jpg

 

casanovabrown2_zpsb1b4cd43.jpg

 

Conflict (1945) - It's alright, a bit predictable to me.  I admit I prefer Bogie as an anti-hero but there wasn't much to sympathize with.

 

To see Bogie actually do what he does in this film was chilling to me.  It's not often you see such a star do this.  Then I enjoyed the creepy "Gaslighting".

 

Cry 'Havoc' (1943) - I'd cry havoc if I was in a camp with all females! :D  I can't remember the plot at all, just sort of "stage door canteen" in a barracks; I often confuse it with "So Proudly We Hail".  All enjoyable actresses, though, so worth watching.

 

You are right on it.  It's very much a "stage door canteen" kind of film.  Ann Sothern carries the film, and this is a huge selling point for me.  Then you get Ella Raines, who has a nice role.  This is not your kind of film, for sure.  It's more for Quiet Gal or Jackie.

 

A Dangerous Profession (1949) - I enjoy these light noirs with Raft.  I found it very entertaining.

 

It's not bad.  I wasn't crazy about the ending.  It's nice to see George and Pat O'Brien together.

 

Enchantment (1948) - A lovely, melancholy film.  Don't care much for the Evelyn/Farley aspect though I like the linking of generations.  Very sad.  David really gave his all to the role as he would again with Separate Tables.  Poignant.  Was anyone ever a more vile "sister" than Jayne Meadows???

 

That was nicely said.  It is a "lovely, melancholy" film.  Love Jayne!  She's great in the film.  And I actually liked the Evelyn/Farley love story.  The ending is really good because I cared about them.  As I said below, it reminded me of your The Age of Innocence.  I really enjoy these forever loves that never were.  I just recently watched another one of these films, too.

 

Framed (1947) - Very enjoyable Glenn Ford noir.  Janis Carter is terrific.

 

I love Glenn Ford, but you are correct, it's Janis who makes the film.

 

framed1_zpsb2e2ac21.jpg

 

framed2_zps8b9a2ebd.jpg

 

Gambling Lady (1934) - Very enjoyable warm-up for Missy's Lady Eve, I thought.

 

Very true!

 

Good News (1947) - You might not believe I'm writing this but I actually rather enjoy this musical, despite my lack of enthusiasm for June.  Though I guess it's supposed to be 1920s (??) it makes me think of the "bobbie soxer" era---the colors, the optimism, the ultra-clean happiness.

 

Say what?!  And how does this not make you gag?!  If only Gary was the lead. :P

 

High Wall (1947) - One of my favorite Taylor movies.  I think he does fine and Audrey Totter is excellent in an important role. Anything remotely connected to Raymond Chandler gets me hooked.,

 

Very good!  I think it's one of Robert Taylor's better performances.  After not liking Taylor all that much, I have definitely warmed up to him.  His later films did the trick.

 

The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939) - Like the others I don't want to watch it often but I think it's quite magnificent in every aspect.  "Toddy" is brilliant as the evil cleric!

 

I'm surprised by everyone being rather indifferent to the film.  I wasn't expecting that,  I've been running into a lot of evil Henry Daniell, of late.

 

I Bury the Living (1958) - Now I know I have to finish watching it.  I started to on YouTube because it has my guy, Richard Boone in it, but I got side tracked and the print was really bad.

 

It plays like an episode of The Twilight Zone.

 

Indiscretion of an American Wife (1953) - I have watched it a few times and started with: Wanting to love it and being deeply disappointed; to: liking it better each time.  I don't fault the performances (though it's hard for me to think of Monty as an Italian for some reason).  Jennifer is great.

 

You don't see Monty as an Italian? :D  I have to watch Terminal Station, De Sica's version.  I thought the film was good not great.  I like the feel of the film and the passion of Giovanni (Montgomery Clift).

 

indiscretionofanamericanwife1_zps3dcbba0

 

Just This Once (1952) -Surprisingly, I most enjoyed this little bit of fluff.  Janet is so pretty and I even tolerated Peter for a change.

 

I'm surprised by your liking this one.  The story frustrated me.

 

The Lawless (1950) - I don't remember much except thinking it mostly interesting---Gail is always worth watching.

 

Gail as a Mexican!  Needless to say, she's still Gail.  She's very sweet.  She's a little feisty in this one, though.

 

Major Dundee (1965) - to me it is Peckinpah's "John Ford Cavalry" picture, only not as good.  Mainly because it's just too long and Chuck is too "Chuck".  It needed someone else in the role.  I'm not a huge fan of Richard Harris at all, but I prefer his character. Senta Berger is beautiful as always but Ben needed more screen time, as did all of the John Ford Stock Company in the movie.

 

I agree with all your comments.  I wanted to like this one more.  Some of the film reminded me of The Wild Bunch, but the ending is so very different.

 

The Man in the Net (1959) - I really like this odd ball flick!  And yes, even the kids for a change.  The way Alan Ladd suddenly becomes Peter Pan/Robin Hood to them charmed me, shockingly.  It kind of hits on a lot of the crazy underbelly goings on of the 1950s.

 

Look at you liking the kiddie films!  That's an upset.  I like your "Peter Pan" comparison. And your 50s comment is an astute one.

 

Ruby Gentry (1952) - Of all the "bad girls" in cinema, Southern bad girls are definitely my favorite.

 

And I know why, Southern Bad Girl!

 

I had no idea this one was even on your horizon.  i watched it on TCM the other day.

 

I like to surprise you sometimes!

 

i have always liked it (though I wish it had been filmed in color).  Again, I like it despite Chuck.  It's a little like Duel in the Sun in some ways, but I prefer it to that movie even though it's not techncially as good.  Maybe because I like Karl Malden a lot, and because I would love to have the power to flood out all the people who'd been mean to me. ha ha ha.

 

I'm sure I'm safe from your flood. :P  The film clearly reminded me of Duel in the Sun, which is a good thing.  The set up is somewhat similar and the ending is very similar.  Love the ending.  I also like Karl Malden in these kind of roles.

 

Ruggles of Red Gap (1935) - Wonderful film, wonderful Laughton.

 

Now this is one I would not expect you to like.

 

The Sea Hawk (1940) - You and Wendy are right, Bill Holden's wife should have stayed home.  How much better it would have been with Maureen O'Hara or Olivia!  It really does have some magnificent scenes, Errol is the whole show, though.  I still prefer the characters in Captain Blood.

 

Poor, boring Brenda. :D  She's so prim and proper, but lovely.  Maureen would be playing you, slapping everyone!  That's your version of a swashie!  A swatty!  Errol is sensational and I actually think the presence of Flora Robson is what really won me over.

 

Stop Me Before I Kill! (1960) - wow, this one sounds so up my alley---can't believe i've not seen it!  i really like Diane Cilento.  She has such a neat voice and look.  Not a typical British lady.  More femme fatale yet kind of earthy.  And it's set in the Cote d'Azur!   I must rent it!

 

Diane is British?  I never knew!  Her name is Italian, so I assumed that's what she was.  I think you'll enjoy the film for what it is.

 

stopmebeforeikill2_zpscfa90baa.jpg

 

stopmebeforeikill1_zps7565693e.jpg

 

Swing High, Swing Low (1937) - I watched it again because I remember enjoying it when I first saw it, liked it a little less this time.  I agree that it's the switch in tone.  I do like the first half a lot, and I especially love the scenes with the rooster.

 

The rooster is good!  I really did like the first half, but the second half was just too jarring for me.  And the reasons for the separation were too much for me.  It seemed contrived.

 

The Suspect (1944) - I've always liked this film.  It's one of the most "Hitchcockian" films Hitchcock never directed (though the theme shows up in almost all his TV episodes).

 

You got it!  It does seem like an episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents.

 

13 West Street (1962) - Alan Ladd?  I'm not sure I have watched it yet.  Any good?

 

You're the one who told me to watch this one!  If you like rich kids terrorizing Alan Ladd and Ladd losing his middle-aged cool, it's okay.  It's not my kind of film.

 

Woman Wanted (1935) - A fun, breezy caper with Maureen so adorable in this period.  Such a radiant smile she had.

 

She's a sweetheart.  She's always so darling.  Her scenes with Joel McCrea at the diner were cute.

 

Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942) - it's true Cagney is great but I prefer him in dramas without dancing.

 

I'm definitely in agreement with you on that one.  But we both don't go for musicals all that much.

 

Your top ten (somehow I can't see any of them cracking your top 100):

 

1. Framed (1947)

2. Conflict (1945)

3. The Suspect (1944)

4. Carrie

5. Indiscretion of an American Wife (1953)

6. Ruggles of Red Gap (1935)

7. The Lawless (1950)
8.Enchantment (1948)
9. The Sea Hawk (1940)
10. The Caine Mutiny (1954)

 

That's extremely impressive!  You guessed six of the ten!  And they weren't obvious ones.  Ruggles of Red Gap, Carrie, and Enchantment are not easy ones to guess I'd like that much.

 

Then you must watch Gladiator. 

 

You just want me to watch your beefcake!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe that one of the reasons why I like the movie so very much is the unusual role. He does it so very well! My enthusiasm is tempered only by the thought that it should have been Claude Rains in the Sydney Greenstreet role. I would find it much more believable that he would devise such a 'gaslight' scheme to draw out the murderer.

 

You are right, SansFin, Claude would have really fit well in the role of the doctor.  But I did like Sydney.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hiya, Ma Stone --  I'm guessing it's Funny Girl.

 

Ding-ding-ding.. ha. We HAVE a winner. :D

 

That one was easy. :)

 

And I usually don't like that as much. It is very "over the top" in terms of the acting.. ha. But even with the "over-acting" I still love it. ha.The mom is overtly dramatic to the point she almost ruins the movie for me.. but I must confess that I love the way little RHODA is overplayed. She's utterly perfect. 

 

Nancy Kelly was the one who was bothering me a bit.  My least favorite part of the film is when it was revealed who she was the daughter of.  That was too much.

 

badseed3_zps644255c4.jpg

 

And again.. some of the characters are really well-played. To me the most believable are the two I already mentioned (LeRoy and Mrs. Dagle) and also Miss Fern. 

 

I agree.  I believe those three are playing their characters to a believable level.  Although LeRoy is really pushing it.

 

badseed2_zps13b6b458.jpg

 

He is first rate with anything I have ever seen him play. I think that the hardest part for me to watch in the film is the human cruelty. That is what I meant when I said it makes me squirm. Human nature can sometimes be an ugly thing.. no matter what one looks like. And the mistreatment of Quasimodo by SO many, over and over.. ugh.. I just can't take it. But it really is a very intriguing story. 

 

Humankind is many different things.  Mean and cruel are some of those things.

 

It does mean more. And maybe the reason that I felt the patriotic theme was so "forced" was because that part of the story really stands out in my memory. He just spoke so eloquently.. reciting something with what you could tell was a reverent passion.. and yet he was standing there in a group of people that SHOULD already have had the same reverence and passion..  and yet for them, it was just a "vague" memory of some old speech by a long-gone president. It was a great moment. 

 

It really is a great moment.  And still true to this day.

 

Meanwhile.. here is one she IS looking forward to watching.. (hey Mr. Grey.. it's right up your alley! Another PRINCESS movie!!) :D

 

Ha!  I cannot believe your little girl is a princess kind of girl!

 

I very much enjoyed reading your analysis of the films on your list. Woo HOO for Ruggles of Red Gap.. ha. I am so pleased you enjoyed it. You are right about the layers of fun characters in this one.. one just adds to the next.  (and good call on the comparison to My Man Godfrey.. very good!) 

Thank you,  That was kind of you to say.

 

Woo.. I am hooked. I DO love a good Dickens.. or even a "Dickens-like" story.. will have to look for this one for sure! 

 

http://www.dailymoti...mand_shortfilms

 

I read  up on this one.. ha. It sounds very "twilight-zone-ish" I bet it is a lot of fun. (in a creepy sort of way) 

 

Good call!  That's precisely how I Bury the Living plays.

As I recall (ha.. though not a Laughton)  this one also it makes a good pairing with The Strange Affair of Uncle Harry too. 

 

The same director, Robert Siodmak, directs both that and The Suspect.  So you are correct!  Have you ever seen The Spiral Staircase?

 

Woo Hoo. ha. At least its not at the TOTAL bottom of your list. :D I'll take somewhere in the mid-range. Ha. I think this is one of those films that in order to enjoy it as much as I do.. you have to like it for what it is.. rather than expect it to be something other than just for "fun" . 

 

I think The Bad Seed is pretty good.  I think if it was more cinematic, it would be very good.

 

badseed4_zps5e8e0d60.jpg

 

Oh.. it was very "Cat and Mouse".... but also a bit of self-defense. If her mom HAD gone after him (especially in that one part.. where he was outside talking to her when she was having her "tea-party") then there would have been a lot of questions about what they were talking about, etc, etc.. and she didn't want THAT to happen. So she just let it drop. (You know.. Can't let mom get TOO many pieces of the puzzle. She MIGHT start to put two and two together and THEN the next thing you know, she'll make you drink pear juice and take your vitamins)

 

That's an interesting angle that I never thought of.  You may be right about that.  I just wonder if Mrs. Penmark (Nancy Kelly) would believe anything that LeRoy (Henry Jones) said to her.  She seemed to believe Rhoda much more than him.

 

badseed5_zpse83ae09b.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Claude would have really fit well in the role of the doctor.  But I did like Sydney.

 

He did it well but I have discomfort in accepting that his deviousness can be so subtle. I at all times see him more as blustery bull who slips with ease into violence. I believe it may be that I typecast him as such because of his very similar roles in: The Mask of Dimitrios (1944) and Casablanca (1942) which he did so very perfectly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Mr. Grey.. 

 

That one was easy.

 

Yes.. well, I am nothing if not predictable... sometimes   :D

 

Nancy Kelly was the one who was bothering me a bit.  My least favorite part of the film is when it was revealed who she was the daughter of.  That was too much

 

She is so bad in this movie.. that it WORKS (but maybe not in the way the director intended?? (ha.. maybe) I enjoy the "campy" feeling all that overacting has to the whole thing. I mean let's face it.. the story itself, if taken at face value is bone-chilling. There is another movie (made in the late 80's or early 90's) called The Good Son. It has a character very similar to Rhoda (at least in terms of his motivations and methods.. in some ways he even makes her look like an amateur.) But it is NOT fun to watch.. in fact I remember hardly making it through that movie because it was so awful and grueling just to watch it all play out. You need the comic relief of some of that bad acting (whether intentional or not) just to make it through this story (ha.. or maybe that is just how I do it) :D 

 

I cannot believe your little girl is a princess kind of girl!

 

She does like the princess movies.. but she is not AS "princess-ey" as she used to be. ha. She has moved on to other interests too. (if you checked that list she made of her animated favorites.. it really is quite the mix) She likes adventure and mystery (gee.. I don't know where she gets  THAT, ha) and she likes comedy too. But there is still a very real place in her heart for a good ole fashioned fairy tale too, now and then. :) 

 

Have you ever seen The Spiral Staircase?

 

I have seen it.. and I l-o-v-e-d LOVED it. I have not seen it in a good long while, but it's a very good suspense story as I recall. 

 

PS: Thanks for that link to Cash on Demand. I have had a few unintended "irons' in my fire this past week so am falling behind, but I DID start watching it several days ago.. but had to get out of it about half way through. I am going to TRY to finish it up soon. I am vERY interested to see how it all ends up. (and yes.. I DO see some good comparisons to the Dickens story, too. Cool!) :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is what I have recently watched:

 

Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955)

Ah, Wilderness! (1935)

The Amazing Adventure (1936)

The Angel Wore Red (1960)

Black Tuesday (1954)

Blithe Spirit (1945)

The Blue Eagle (1926)

Broken Lullaby (1932)

Caesar and Cleopatra (1945)

Casino Royale (1967)

Champion (1949)

Cinderella (1950)

The Comedians (1967)

The Courtship of Eddie's Father (1963)

The Crowd Roars (1932)

A Damsel in Distress (1937)

Devil and the Deep (1932)

The Egyptian (1954)

The Ex-Mrs. Bradford (1936)

Fog Over Frisco (1934)

The Girl in Black Stockings (1957)

Heat Lightning (1934)

His Private Secretary (1933)

Homecoming (1948)

The Hour Before the Dawn (1944)

I Want to Live! (1958)

Jesse James (1939)

Ladies in Love (1936)

M (1951)

The Magnificent Ambersons (1942)

Mannequin (1937)

The Mysterious Mr. Wong (1934)

Night Flight (1933)

Night Unto Night (1949)

No More Orchids (1932)

Our Man in Havana (1959)

Plunder Road (1957)

The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933)

The Secret Bride (1934)

She Couldn't Say No (1954)

Sleeping Beauty (1959)

A Stolen Life (1946)

There's No Business Like Show Business (1954)

These Three (1936)

This Property Is Condemned (1966)

The Threat (1949)

The Truth About Youth (1930)

The Turning Point (1952)

Two-Faced Woman (1941)

We Were Strangers (1949)

 

Does anyone have any thoughts on these films?  What are your favorites from the list?  Any guess on my favorites?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955)

I like this movie but I have very odd feeling of it: it nearly seems to me that there is much more plot than is required of Abbott and Costello movie! Pick a pick breaks me up every time!

 

The Ex-Mrs. Bradford (1936)

I love this movie very much! William Powell is Nick Charles even when he is Dr. Lawrence Bradford. Jean Arthur has an energy which Myrna Loy lacks. 

 

Fog Over Frisco (1934)

I like this very much. It has much more energy than most movies of the genre of the era. It seems to me a slightly odd role for Bette Davis but that may be one reason I like it.

 

Ladies in Love (1936)

I found this an unusual offering of much-used storylines. 

 

The Mysterious Mr. Wong (1934)

I love Bela Lugosi and so this movie is a natural for me! He is perfect in sophisticated ruthlessness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really reaching out of the realms of regular viewing, huh? What an interesting list. Interesting enough that I haven't seen many here. This may be the list where I have seen the fewest yet.

 

Of those I'll point to "The Ex-Mrs. Bradford" because you can't go wrong when Powell and Arthur are involved. It's a fine film.

 

Then there is "The Courtship Of Eddie's Father." I really like it. Dina Merrill doesn't stand a chance in this one because who wouldn't want to marry Shirley Jones. (It's not really fair to Dina.) Ford may be a bit old but I think he does a terrific job as the exasperated father who would be perfectly happy making his own decisions if only people would let him. Ron Howard is great. My favorite line in the film is when he is at camp and discovers that girls really like money.

 

Some I have seen but it was a lifetime ago and have nothing to suggest there.  Others? Well, I need to get a move on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really reaching out of the realms of regular viewing, huh? What an interesting list. Interesting enough that I haven't seen many here. This may be the list where I have seen the fewest yet.

 

Of those I'll point to "The Ex-Mrs. Bradford" because you can't go wrong when Powell and Arthur are involved. It's a fine film.

 

Then there is "The Courtship Of Eddie's Father." I really like it. Dina Merrill doesn't stand a chance in this one because who wouldn't want to marry Shirley Jones. (It's not really fair to Dina.) Ford may be a bit old but I think he does a terrific job as the exasperated father who would be perfectly happy making his own decisions if only people would let him. Ron Howard is great. My favorite line in the film is when he is at camp and discovers that girls really like money.

 

Some I have seen but it was a lifetime ago and have nothing to suggest there.  Others? Well, I need to get a move on.

 

Well add me as a fan of The Ex-Mrs. Bradford.    This is a fine film and Powell and Arthur are great as a team.   I also found the comment about Loy as lacking the energy of Arthur in the The Thin Man movies of interest.   While I love the teaming of Powell and Loy I think the series of films would have been just as good with Arthur.   But then Arthur is my favorite female comic actor (one of the reasons being because she brings so much heart and warmth while still being very funny).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Scott, I see you have Jesse James (1939) on your list. I wrote about that one about a year ago down South on Western Rambles. You answered saying you hadn't seen it yet. I tried to find that post in order to refresh my memory but couldn't find it. I remember liking it a lot. I'm not a Tyrone Power fan but he was fine here. I'm very much a Fonda fan and he was good as well. I remember thinking that they could have switched roles and the movie would not suffer (but Power was fine.)  The actress playing Jesse's wife was especially good as I remember, she communicated the angst of that particular character very well. I seem to recall a big name actor in a smaller role, a lawman who crosses over to be a help to Jesse (sorry, I should look some of this up). Great color, and a very realistic finish. One of the better of all the James' films, maybe the best.

 

OT; sports talk: great win on Sunday. I would like to see your guys do well, Romo is deserving IMO.

 

==

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Mr. Grey...

 

I have not seen too many on your latest list.. but there are a few that I have seen:

 

Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955)  Pretty sure I have seen it when I was a kid.. always fun to see those two in all their antics, but not really remembering much other than.. ha.. Bud and Lou.. and there was a mummy. :D

 

Blithe Spirit (1945)  I have not seen this movie in  years but I did enjoy it. (saw it as a play decades ago when I was a kid, long before I saw the movie and liked that better, probably.. but the film was fun, as I recall) 

 

Casino Royale (1967)  Oh my golly.. ha.. I saw this film in of all places JR HIGH (they showed it in a "study hall" over a couple of days.. can you believe it??? Ha) That is the last and only time I think I ever saw it, but I remember being appalled at some of the humor (ha.. even way back then) but I DO remember thinking parts of it were funny.. but then.. of course.. I was like.. 11. Ha.. so funny COULD be a relative term. I don't think it would be one I would enjoy much NOW.. but I just remember my friends and I cracking up at some of it way back when. I can picture you like this one.. even in all it's silliness. :D

 

Cinderella (1950)  Used to be the kidling's favorite princess.. if not her favorite princess movie. Until.. well.. she eventually had to "Let it go" Ha! 

 

The Courtship of Eddie's Father (1963)  Probably my favorite out of your most current list I l-o-v-e LOVE this movie.. have seen it over the years and every time I enjoy it more. 

 

Heat Lightning (1934)   Saw this several years ago and wish I could remember more about it. I DO remember enough to recall it was a very twisty-turny sort of story.(and I mean that in a good way) and I recall just being pretty amazed by Aline MacMahon.. she was really something in this one, wasn't she? I imagine this one scored well for you.. but I am never any good at guessing.. so I could be wrong. 

 

I Want to Live! (1958)  Saw it a very long time ago.. very grueling, as I recall. 

 

 

Sleeping Beauty (1959)  Probably one of my less liked Disney princess stories. (the fairies do it in for me.. blech) I like it well enough, I guess,  but the kidling is a big fan. 

 

A Stolen Life (1946)  One of two movies where Bette plays twins.. I can't even say for sure how much I like this one because I don't remember as much about this one as I do the other one (Dead Ringer.. which I did enjoy) but I DO remember the Carol Burnett "take off" of it better.. ha. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Merry Christmas Torture Thread friends.. in light of this special occassion.. (and since it IS the torture thread, after all) here's a clip from Mr. Grey's favorite Christmas movie of all time:   :D

 

 

 

And of course.. treats! Christmas cookies for everybody: 

 

christmascookies_zps83b6b680.jpg

 

Merry Christmas, one and all. :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see more movies on your list that I'm familiar with this time.

My favorites would include Courtship of Eddie's Father, The Prizefighter and the Lady and This Property is Condemned.

It's funny that you've now seen Jesse James, I thought you had already. What's funny is the leading lady is Nancy Kelly---the same Nancy Kelly as in The Bad Seed. And in both movies she cries a lot! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Warmest of holiday wishes, my friends, my friends!  Frank, I just love Bogie as a psycho, from THE RETURN OF DR. X, CONFLICT, THE TWO MRS. CARROLLS, IN A LONELY PLACE, and THE CAINE MUTINY.

 

 

!https://images.search.yahoo.com/images/view;_ylt=AwrTca9.N5tULvoArt4PxQt.;_ylu=X3oDMTBsOXB2YTRjBHNlYwNzYwRjb2xvA2dxMQR2dGlkAw--?p=the+return+dr+x&back=https%3A%2F%2Fsearch.yahoo.com%2Fyhs%2Fsearch%3Fp%3Dthe%2Breturn%2Bof%2Bdr.%2Bx%2Bphoto%26ei%3DUTF-8%26hsimp%3Dyhs-001%26hspart%3Dmozilla&w=576&h=416&imgurl=media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com%2F736x%2Fbd%2Fab%2Fac%2Fbdabac958502dbe25c840752e40c3379.jpg&size=18KB&name=bdabac958502dbe25c840752e40c3379.jpg&rcurl=http%3A%2F%2Fpinterest.com%2Fpin%2F160370436704290126%2F&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fpinterest.com%2Fpin%2F160370436704290126%2F&type=&no=8&tt=120&oid=ff987bbf18323794302d33d695dd43b7&****=Humphrey+Bogart%2C+The+Return+of+Dr.+X.&sigr=11cogtb8f&sigi=12df1gu2o&sign=114a29b2f&sigt=103vg5ole&sigb=13543ikg3&fr=yhs-mozilla-001&hspart=mozilla&hsimp=yhs-001!

 

!https://images.search.yahoo.com/images/view;_ylt=A0LEVu5XOptUon4A9.oPxQt.;_ylu=X3oDMTBsa3ZzMnBvBHNlYwNzYwRjb2xvA2JmMQR2dGlkAw--?p=two+mrs+carrolls&back=https%3A%2F%2Fsearch.yahoo.com%2Fyhs%2Fsearch%3Fp%3Dthe%2Btwo%2Bmrs.%2Bcarrolls%2Bphoto%26ei%3DUTF-8%26hsimp%3Dyhs-001%26hspart%3Dmozilla&w=736&h=539&imgurl=media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com%2F736x%2F2d%2F39%2F78%2F2d3978de2d97f792b494c71827c5a2c4.jpg&size=143KB&name=2d3978de2d97f792b494c71827c5a2c4.jpg&rcurl=http%3A%2F%2Fpinterest.com%2Fpin%2F103301385175410844%2F&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fpinterest.com%2Fpin%2F103301385175410844%2F&type=&no=3&tt=120&oid=1d09c9e870fd2f9e38cb5c290feefab8&****=The+Two+Mrs+Carrolls&sigr=11cmi7vf2&sigi=12d7nittk&sign=114m5hbt2&sigt=103vg5ole&sigb=137edndl1&fr=yhs-mozilla-001&hspart=mozilla&hsimp=yhs-001!

 

 

Margaret Rutherford is the best thing about BLITHE SPIRIT.   She's the epitome of the British
"eccentric".

 

Fine performances from Gene Tierney, Edmund Purdom, Michael Wilding, Bella Darvi, Victor Mature and Jean Simmons in THE EGYPTIAN.  This movie used to frighten me as a kidlet, especially the scenes of slaves stirring the natron in large pots for future mummies.

 

Back in the day, CRY 'HAVOC' used to play a lot on the old t.v.  I remember thinking the first time I ever saw this that it was probably the most depressing movie I'd ever seen.  I still think so.  A stereotyped "cross-section" of WWII volunteer nurses (stripper, socialite, etc.) are imprisoned in a Japanese labor camp.  Throw in sniper attacks, malaria, etc.  Very grim.

 

Some funny routines in A&C MEET THE MUMMY, my favorite being the newspaper boy mirage.  Plus, there's Marie Windsor.   Bud's stomach actually looked larger than Lou's.

 

A STOLEN LIFE is pure Bette Davis camp.  The "twins" special effects are really good.  Dane Clark's intensity as a muscular-but-arty "New York" type is unintentionally amusing. 

 

I don't remember much of THIS PROPERTY IS CONDEMNED, except that it's probably one of Natalie Wood's best roles.

 

A basket full of kisses to all!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the Christmas and holiday wishes, Quiet Gal and Bronxie.  I hope everyone has a joyous and loving holiday and new year. 

 

Cheers to TCM and this little board!  Especially to those I have come to be friends with.  Here's to you all.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Happy New Year, Frank. I'll comment about a few of the lesser-known films on your list that I've seen.

 

A Stolen Life: Doggies are smarter than people, and this movie proves it. This same device was used in the recent Poirot entry, Elephants Can Remember. I'm very fond of this movie, though it can't go where we want it to, namely, would Glenn Ford know the difference if the other twin slept with him?

 

Heat Lightning: Mervyn LeRoy does a great job directing a play on a low budget. Aline MacMahon is great in the lead role, and what a supporting cast: Glenda Farrell, Ruth Donnelly, Jane Darwell. Both funnier and more moving than you would expect.

 

Homecoming: Lana Turner is very appealing, and she has great chemistry with Gable. This film feels painfully real at times about how flirtation and unconsummated love feel just as devastating as actual physical adultery. Another on the plus side for Mr. LeRoy.

 

Our Man in Havana: Another winner for Carol Reed. Noel Coward's scene in the men's room with Alec Guinness is hilarious.

 

She Couldn't Say No: This is the Jean Simmons/Robert Mitchum comedy, isn't it? Much better than I expected. Simmons and Mitchum are good together.

 

These Three: Not one of Wyler's first-rank films, but still quite entertaining. Merle Oberon, Miriam Hopkins, and Joel McCrea make this well worth seeing. A bowdlerized version of The Children's Hour, but despite or because of that, holds up much better.

 

We Were Strangers: Imperfect, but this one has a special place in my affections. An intelligent film about a revolutionary group, with no punches pulled about the kind of decisions that such a group would have to make. The John Garfield character is pretty clearly a Communist, though that can only be implied. On release, it was attacked from both the right and the left, which might suggest that Huston & Co. made a pretty good film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will finally reply to everyone's posts tomorrow.  The holidays really zapped me.

 

1. Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955) -- One of the best A&C films that I have seen.  I've always been a sucker for the Arabian settings, especially when mummies are involved.  I love A&C when there is danger involved and this one has a terrific mix of danger and laughs.  It also helps that Marie Windsor is on hand for some villainy.  She's excellent.  And is that Richard Deacon?!  Lots of fun.

 

abbottandcostellomeetthemummy2_zps685cb6

 

2. The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) -- This film just builds and builds and builds.  By its end, I was really liking it.  This is my kind of story.  A love story that is interrupted and never fulfilled.  A love that cannot be consummated because of silly societal reasons.  A film such as Scorsese's The Age of Innocence or Enchanted come to mind.  In some ways, this is like a western, where the world is changing and progressing and there are some who refuse to move with the times, even scoff at them, and it ultimately dooms them.  Joseph Cotten is sensational in the picture.  I love his character.  I love how forgiving he is, how loving he is of Isabel (Dolores Costello).  Tim Holt is also good, as the arrogant son of Isabel.  It's truly amazing just how great and mature Orson Welles' first two films were.

 

magnificentambersons1_zpsa482d32a.jpg

 

3. Champion (1949) -- I should know better by now that I should not dread watching a boxing film.  They are almost always good.  This is no exception.  The formula is pretty standard: a boxer goes from the gutter to the penthouse and spits on everyone who helped him to reach his glory.  The twist with this one is the women we get to meet along the way.  There is Emma (Ruth Roman), Palmer (Lola Albright), and Miss Goddess (Marilyn Maxwell).  It's these three women who add a lot of color and texture to the film, particularly to that of our "hero", Midge (Kirk Douglas).  And, yes, Kirk is very "Kirk" here.  He has a twinkle in his eye and lots of gusto.

 

 

4. The Ex-Mrs. Bradford (1936) -- Typically, it's William Powell who steals a film.  Here, Jean Arthur outdoes him.  And for me to watch Powell and Arthur carrying on as they do is sheer delight. The film is basically a reversal of The Thin Man.  Instead of the perfect wife (Nora/Myrna Loy) helping Bill solve the crimes, we've got the meddling ex who is creating trouble more than anything for Bill.  That's where the comedy stems.  And I found Jean's meddlesome "Mrs. Bradford" to be a great deal of fun.  The actual mysteries found in the film aren't the strongest, but they are certainly passable.  An underrated film.

 

5. Our Man in Havana (1959) -- SansFin, you scored well with this one.  It's a goodie.  Carol Reed directing Graham Greene.  Awesome!  Alec Guinness is once again superb in a comedy.  Here, Alec plays a regular shoe salesman living in Cuba who gets mixed up in international espionage thanks to the British Secret Service.  What ensues is both humorous and rather thought-provoking, even emotional.  Oh, the characters this film offers are delicious and are performed by real pros.  From Burl Ives to Ernie Kovacs to Noel Coward to Ralph Richardson.  They are all so good.  Maureen O'Hara plays Alec's love interest.  It's quite a nice role for Maureen.  I liked her a great deal.  I also liked Jo Morrow, who plays Alec's teenage daughter, who seems to be about six, emotionally.  This film kind of reminded me of the Coen Brothers' film Burn After Reading, a film I really like.  Something tells me they were influenced by Graham Greene.

 

6. Two-Faced Woman (1941) -- Could this actually be a Sweet T suggestion checking in this high on my list?  What?!  Do you believe in miracles?  Yes!  I never heard of this film.  When I saw it starred Greta Garbo in a comedy with Melvyn Douglas, I became excited to see this one.  It doesn't disappoint.  Garbo and Melvyn have a whirlwind romance and get married on the quick.  Eventually, Melvyn returns to work and Garbo fears he is back with is old flame, Griselda (Constance Bennett).  In an attempt to figure things, Greta pretends to be her twin sister.  The comedy follows.  What I really loved about this film is that Greta seems to be parodying herself.  She's both funny and sexy at the same time.  It's remarkable.  Also, the zingers Connie Bennett tosses around are absolutely hilarious.  Her bitter jealousy had me rolling.  Roland Young is also quite funny.  This is an underrated comedy.

 

7. The Threat (1949) -- A low-budget film noir with Charles McGraw seeking revenge on those who sent him up.  There isn't much to this film, but the grit and tough situations made it for me.  The title is appropriate.  For McGraw is a serious threat.  And you feel it with him.  He means business.  I mean "Lawrence Tierney" kind of business.  So if you're a fan of Chuck, I highly suggest this one.  Is it a great film?  No.  But it has a good energy to it.

 

8. Cinderella (1950) -- Who knew this would be one of my favorite Disney princess films?  I really liked it.  I knew of the Cinderella story before watching the film but seeing how it was told was another thing.  I enjoyed the comedy.  There was a "Tom and Jerry" feel with the animals that I really liked.  I also liked the entire ball sequence.  I loved how it was shown.  And then the mad dash before the strike of midnight.  All done so well.  And the villainy of the stepmother was also quite good.  What's with you stepmothers always being evil, Quiet Gal? :D

 

9. Blithe Spirit (1945) -- What an interesting film this was.  I had no idea what to expect from it and what I got was charming.  It seems as if most people gravitate towards the eccentric medium in this one, played by Margaret Rutherford.  While she's a scream, it was the two wives that thrilled me.  I loved the lazy, jealous, mean-"spirited" Elvira (Kay Hammond) and the uppity Ruth (Constance Cummings).  Kay and Constance are excellent.  I also enjoyed Rex Harrision, who is constantly swatted back and forth by his two wives.

 

10. The Girl in Black Stockings (1957) -- While this film never completely comes off, its sinister mood had me liking it a lot.  The title surely sparks a certain seediness and the opening scene really sets the mood for what is to come.  From there, we are introduced to multiple characters with strange hang-ups and issues.  In some ways, we are in Twin Peaks.  John Dehner is the local sheriff on the case and he has to wade through some messy people.  Anne Bancroft is the star before she was a star.  You'll also find Lex Barker, Mamie Van Doren, Stuart Whitman, and Marie Windsor in a different kind of role.  A guy named Ron Randell plays the most interesting character.  I just loved the creepy feel of this one.

 

11. M (1951) -- The American remake of Fritz Lang's classic is ably done by Joseph Losey.  It's nowhere near as good, but it has its merits.  The bravest decision was to cast David Wayne in the lead.  To think of David playing such a character blows my mind. But he does, and he's good.  There are some aspects of the film that are pretty much lifted from Lang's but there are others I wish were similar.  The lacking of a strong "Lohmann" hurts the film.  I also feel the "trial" at film's end is nothing like Lang's.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYONOTreWqY

 

12. The Egyptian (1954) -- I tend to worry about watching "epics" but the call of Gene Tierney made this a film I've been wanting to see.  It ends up winning with me.  And as lovely as Gene is in the film, it was Edmund Purdom who brings it through.  Purdom plays the lead, an idealistic doctor called "Sinuhe".  Sinuhe starts off well but he soon meets Miss Goddess (Bella Darvi) and his life starts to take a drastic turn.  Darn that Miss G and her wiles!  And Bella plays her as good as anyone. :P  From there, the film becomes a battle for power between the regime in power and the rebels.  All the while, a battle within Sinuhe rages.  Gene has a couple memorable scenes.  Jean Simmons plays a total sweetheart in the film.  She's a doll.  Victor Mature plays Sinuhe's friend in arms while Peter Ustinov is Sinuhe's under-handed loyal friend in rags.  Henry Daniell also plays an angel of a fella.  It's a pretty good film.

 

I remember the version I watched on YouTube had some fella smoking and snapping open cans while watching:

 

 

13. Homecoming (1948) -- What a couple Clark Gable and Lana Turner make in this one.  It's films and roles like this where I love Lana.  She was simply marvelous as "Snapshot".  What a cute name!  Love how everything unfolds between Snapshot and "Lee" (Gable).  Love their fate.  Anne Baxter as the wife at home was an interesting choice.  She surely fit the role.  What is the story about?  It's simply a romance that develops in the arena of war that makes life complicated.  My kind of picture.

 

14. Plunder Road (1957) -- When it comes to story, this film noir isn't all that good.  When it comes to mood, this one is really good.  This is a heist film that has shades of a western mixed with film noir.  It's rather unique for this reason.  It's mostly star-less and there isn't much dialogue to be found.  At least, none that is all that important.  The film instead relies on the tension of escaping.  You gotta love happy endings. :P

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9iFQOwZdZc

 

15. The Turning Point (1952) -- Corruption combines with a love triangle in this solid film noir from William Dieterle.  Our "hero" is Jerry McKibbon (William Holden), a cynical reporter who seemingly knows the scoop on everyone.  Knowing the scoop puts you in danger with many people.  Sometimes it's your life.  Sometimes it's your love.  Here it's both.  Jerry has a thing for Amanda (Alexis Smith), who happens to be his pal's (Edmond O'Brien) steady.  Complicated.  To make things worse, Jerry knows a dark secret that could really create some issues for him and others.  The elements at play and how it all plays out makes this a film noir of value.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ud7xhtDvHuU

 

16. Ladies in Love (1936) -- A Sweet T suggestion that I ended up really liking a lot.  This is a good version of "Three Coins in the Fountain.  The story follows three women who are looking for love but each has a differing viewpoint on what kind of man they want and what constitutes happiness.  Yeah, this is completely Fox.  This is How to Marry a Millionaire and Three Coins in the Fountain.  What makes this film so much better with me is what happens to the women.  Who plays the women?  Loretta Young, Janet Gaynor, and Constance Bennett.  I loved them all.  There is also Simone Simon to spice things up.  She's great.  Who are the fellas?  Who cares!  All right, all right.  Tyrone Power, Don Ameche, Paul Lukas, and Alan Mowbray.  Yes, Alan Mowbray!  Amazing.  I like Janet and I typically love Connie, but it's Loretta who is best in this one.

 

 

17. No More Orchids (1932) -- Carole Lombard, you are wonderful.  Carole's ability to be funny and dramatic is on display here.  She plays a spoiled girl who gets her world turned upside down by good guy Tony Gage (Lyle Talbot).  The two fall in love.  The only problem is, she's to be married to a prince.  Oh the decisions you women have to make. :D  The film bounces between comedy, romance, and drama.  The ending is a stunner.  Walter Connolly, who plays Carole's father, turns in a memorable performance.  I also enjoyed Louise Closser Hale, who plays Carole's grandmother and Walter's mother.  She's a good ol' gal.

 

18. Heat Lightning (1934) -- A different kind of twist on The Petrified Forest.  It's a strong feminine twist.  And I loved the twist.  Aline MacMahon and Ann Dvorak play two sisters who run a gas station out in the middle of nowhere.  They have some regulars who stop by and random travelers.  The mix of the two becomes interesting, especially when a man Aline is familiar with stumbles back into her life.  Preston Foster plays this fella.  I have learned that Preston played devilish men in the 30s and he did so exceptionally well.  Glenda Farrell is on hand, as are Ruth Donnelly, Jane Darwell, and Frank McHugh.  The 30s really was the decade for women's pictures.  This is a darn good one.

 

19. This Property Is Condemned (1966) -- Tennessee Williams is a great favorite of mine, so even his weaker efforts still enthrall me on some level.  I would classify this one as a weaker one, yet I still liked it.  One thing I'm starting to understand is that I actually like Robert Redford.  I really go for his romanticism and his "chiding".  Both are on display in this film.  Natalie Wood plays the alluring but childish Alva Starr, who becomes entangled with Robert.  Their relationship is off and on, for different reasons.  They are destined for happiness, right?  The film reminded me the most of Picnic, and it had some elements of God's Little Acre and Ruby Gentry.  I like all of those films.

 

thispropertyiscondemned7_zpse5547ab1.jpg

 

 

thispropertyiscondemned5_zps167d78e5.jpg

 

20. Devil and the Deep (1932) -- Is it possible for a film to star both Gary Cooper and Cary Grant to have another player outshine them both?  The answer is yes.  For the star of this intriguing film is Charles Laughton, in his first American picture.  As the story goes, Laughton is a commander of a ship who is married to the restless and "imprisoned" Tallulah Bankhead.  Talk about a pair!  Tallulah is involved with a young lieutenant of her husband's (Cary) when another (Gary) shows up in his stead.  For an early-30s film, this one is rather psychological, which is what really had me liking it.  Laughton's actions and plight are great to watch.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOMZsKigz70

 

21. Night Unto Night (1949) -- I found this film to be fascinating at the outset.  The whole idea of two haunted people (Ronald Reagan and Viveca Lindfors) falling for each other with a haunted, beach-front house providing the backdrop was highly appealing to me.  How the story was starting to build and form had me hooked.  But the film slowly starts to reveal too much and this leads to a less-fulfilling final act.  Both Ronnie and Viveca are terrific in the film.  You do feel for them both.  Then there is Broderick Crawford.  You have to see him playing a philosophical artist.  Broderick Crawford!  I also loved Rosemary DeCamp, who plays Viveca's man-hungry sister.  She's a treat!  Overall, I think the film is pretty good.  It features good atmosphere.

 

22. A Stolen Life (1946) -- The opening scenes of this film had me loving it.  I was crazy about Bette Davis and her budding relationship with Glenn Ford.  Enter: Bette Davis.  Huh?  Yeah, her.  Yes, this is another film where Bette is playing both sisters.  What ensues causes me to drift further and further away from my liking the film.  I just didn't get why Glenn would do it.  Although, I kind of do.  We men are great. :D  Then Dane Clark shows up and I'm lost.  I guess I'm with Bette, at this point.  By the final act, things start to come back around and I started to like the film again.  When it was over, I had mixed feelings about it, but still liked it enough.  I continue to go for the sweet and loving Bette.

 

23. The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933) -- It's snippy Myrna Loy!  She at least starts out like Miss G.  But she changes.  This is another boxing film that ends up being good.  The formula is present.  A boxer ends up winning over a woman and climbs the ladder, only to get too big for his britches.  There's also the washed-up trainer who comes back for one more chance at the title.  It sure helps that he's played by Walter Huston.  What helps separate this particular boxing film from others is that many of the participants are actual boxers, including the lead, Max Baer.  In fact, Baer would end up fighting his opponent (Primo Carnera) in the film for the World Heavyweight title the following year.  Amazing.  Jack Dempsey also has a scene in the film and referees the main event.  And if all of that isn't enough, there's also a spurned power broker (Otto Kruger) to complicate matters.  All of it works.

 

24. Sleeping Beauty (1959) -- I would have liked this film a lot more it it didn't focus on the fairies the entire time!  Ugh!  But I do love Maleficient (Eleanor Audley).  She's frightening.  But who comes to the rescue?  Nooooooooooooooooooooooo!

 

25. Fog Over Frisco (1934) -- Bette Davis and Margaret Lindsay as sisters.  Woohoo!  I bet you can't guess which sister is playing with fire.  The big twist in this film is a doozy and pretty much had me liking the film.  It's what happens after this twist where the film veers off into less-interesting waters.  Still, it's a pretty decent film.

 

26. Jesse James (1939) -- A pretty entertaining western, from start to finish.  The pairing of Tyrone Power with Henry Fonda is darn interesting.  The two are so different.  Henry is so serious and Ty is more devil-may-care.  I like the mixing of the two.  The casting of Brian Donlevy and John Carradine in critical roles was spot on.  You can't pick two better villains for this time period.  The strangest casting is Donald Meek as the ruthless railroad president.  That didn't add up.  Randolph Scott is also around, but he's caught in a "blah" role.  The James story is told in a fun way.  It's well done.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpIQ5gxFPM0

 

27. These Three (1936) -- Interesting.  Very interesting.  In fact, you will find some elements of The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie in this film, and that's a good thing with me.  The story is about two young women who open a school for young girls.  While constructing the school, they meet a young doctor and the two fall for him.  This creates a situation that is later abused.  The stars of this film are sensational.  They are all so good.  The two women are played by Merle Oberon and Miriam Hopkins and the doctor is Joel McCrea.  What a threesome.  And it's Miriam who I like the most.  Ahhhh, Miriam wins me a lot in the 30s.  And reading about this film afterwards, I come to find The Children's Hour is also taken from the same source material.  It sure sounds like I'm gonna like that one, too.

 

28. Broken Lullaby (1932) -- This is another charming Ernst Lubitsch comedy with such wonderful characters and a delightful bounce.  Huh?  What?  Ooops!  My mistake!  This is actually an anti-war pic directed by Lewis Milestone.  Excuse me?  It's directed by Lubitsch?!  Well, now.  Yes, who would have thought Lubitsch would be behind an anti-war pic with such a fascinating twist.  This one is unique.  In fact, it's so strange that you are left with an uneasy feeling about everything.  Lionel Barrymore is the biggest star in the film, but this film isn't about stars.  It's all about feelings.

 

29. The Courtship of Eddie's Father (1963) -- I entered this viewing really wanting to love this one.  I was fully expecting to, actually.  But I was mostly underwhelmed.  I believe I was hoping to see more of a romance but it ends up being more of a realization than a romance.  "Oh yeah, that woman next door is really who I should love".  The key word may be "should".  But love doesn't usually work that way.  I did like the presentation of dating for a single parent.  The pressure of finding someone who can not only fit in your life but also your child's life.  In fact, that sometimes can be most important.  Dina Merrill didn't have a chance.  Ronnie Howard is certainly the best thing about the film.  He's sweet and inquisitive.  I liked Glenn Ford's clueless male world and Shirley Jones' female frustration and disgust.  That's something I'm used to receiving!

 

30. Mannequin (1937) -- The pairing of Spencer Tracy with Joan Crawford is one I had to see.  I just couldn't picture it.  Surprisingly, they worked well together.  It's because of Joan.  I just love how Joan can be feisty one moment and then completely soft and loving the next.  She's highly adept at this.  I find myself liking her more and more.  I was really into this film for the first half but the second half falls apart.  It's all because of Spence's character and what happens to him.

 

31. Ah, Wilderness! (1935) -- A very sweet and likable film that is made even better due to a lovely cast.  I loved the valedictorian speech that Richard (Eric Linden) was going to unload on his school. :D  Lionel Barrymore, Wallace Beery, Aline MacMahon, Spring Byington, Charley Grapewin, and Cecilia Parker are all quite good.  They make the film for me.  Helen Flint's scene is a hoot.  In a strange way, I find Wes Anderson's Rushmore to be a take off of this story/film.

 

32. The Truth About Youth (1930) -- Okay, I'm convinced.  Miss Goddess must be 108 years old because Myrna Loy is playing her once again.  It's uncanny!  Here, Myrna is playing "The Firefly", which is Miss G's old stage name.  Myrna is bouncing from one guy to the next.  Whoever has money, that's who she's with.  Young David Manners is her latest victim.  He goes by the name "Imp", by the way.  "Imp" is to be married to darling Loretta Young.  If you think that is a mess, that ain't even the biggest mess.  The film feels very "1930", which means it is stagnant.  But I assure you, Myrna surely ain't stagnant.  Oh, wow!

 

33. A Damsel in Distress (1937) -- You can tell I'm a Fred Astaire convert because there isn't much to this story of impending marriage yet I was still charmed because of Fred.  The power of Fred.  Not to say that I wasn't pleased to see Joan Fontaine.  I also liked George Burns and Gracie Allen in this one.  Gracie was making me laugh.  Lord Marshmorton (Montagu Love), Joan's father, was a character that I enjoyed.  George Gershwin did the music, but since I rarely recall musical scores, it's hard for me to say if I liked it or not!

 

34. I Want to Live! (1958) -- I can definitely see how Susan Hayward won the Oscar for this one.  She is put through an emotional wringer but she plays it with such strength.  Her "Barbara" is defiant at times but hurting and helpless.  It's a rather nuanced performance. As for the film itself, I can't say it was my kind of flick, even though I'm a Robert Wise fan and I like his social messages.  I'm just not one to like prison films. They are draining to me.

 

35. The Comedians (1967) -- More Graham Greene!  While this one wasn't nearly as good as Our Man in Havana, I still found enough to like.  To see Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor in this kind of film was rather wild.  Lots of interesting characters with a strange kind of story enveloping them.  Alec Guinness as a "Major" fit snug.  Peter Ustinov as the milquetoast Ambassador was nice.  Paul Ford and Lillian Gish as the self-important Americans was right on point.  Loved Georg Stanford Brown as the menacing police enforcer.  James Earl Jones was also fascinating as a doctor.  With so many great pieces to play with in the story but it never rises to their level.  But I do like Greene's basis of stories.  He's seemingly always attacking the self-assured, those who feel they have a duty to carry out the most blind of missions in the name of "protecting the people".  The ironic hypocrisy.  Love it.

 

comedians2_zps7bc3735e.jpg

 

36. Casino Royale (1967) -- There were times during this Bond spoof that I wanted to scream in frustration, most notably the scenes in Berlin.  Painful!  There were other times I found the film to be fun and funny.  Peter Sellers and David Niven go a long way with both.  The other saving grace for me is the sexuality.  It's way over-the-top.  I enjoyed that. Deborah Kerr is especially sexy in the film.  Yes, you heard me right.  Deborah Kerr!  What a lass!  The ending to this one is dreadful.

 

37. Black Tuesday (1954) -- A bit of a "throwback" for Edward G. Robinson, as he's back to playing gangsters in this prison break film noir.  Eddie is terrific.  He's laying it on thick in this one and comes off terribly menacing.  He makes the film.  The problem is the story and direction aren't the best and the supporting cast falls short.  Peter Graves is a fellow convict on the run and he sure doesn't seem like one.  Milburn Stone plays the prison chaplin. :D

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyQn9sCPjdY

 

38. She Couldn't Say No (1954) -- With a title like this, I couldn't wait to watch it!  It ain't what it seems. :D  Instead, it's a sweet picture about a rich Jean Simmons coming to a small town where a doctor helped her father in the past.  She is there to repay the community through gifts of kindness.  Jean runs into the doctor's son, played by Robert Mitchum.  What's with Mitch being doctors?  I can't believe it!  Here he's a small-town doc who loves his fishing.  Like many comedies, Jean and Mitch get off on the wrong foot but eventually become smitten with each other.  The film is very cute and likable.  The cast of small-town folk helps raise the film a level, for you will find Arthur Hunnicutt, Edgar Buchanan, Wallace Ford, and Raymond Walburn.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dafwOyWxnPk

 

39. The Secret Bride (1934) -- Barbara Stanwyck and Warren William are a married couple who cannot let anyone know they are married because it compromise Barbara's father, who is the governor.  It seems our governor is caught up in some shadiness and Warren, who is the attorney general, is now in a spot.  If that isn't complicated enough, another development soon arises that places Barbara in a moral crisis.  All of these underhanded doings make the film sound interesting, but the storytelling doesn't keep up.  The cast is good.  Glenda Farrell gets mixed up in this mess.  Douglass Dumbrille is behind some of the mess.  Stanwyck and William?  Meh.  And that's saying something.

 

40. The Blue Eagle (1926) -- It's George O'Brien and Janet Gaynor before Sunrise.  I guess this was the honeymoon.  John Ford gets to hang out in familiar territory here, as the focus of this film is on two rival sailors who end up brawling over a girl.  There's an odd twist that occurs that takes the film to a place I wasn't expecting.  It eventually ends back in "Ford country".  While the film isn't the best of Ford, it's still a fun ride.  If you like seeing George topless, you'll be in for a treat.  David Butler, who went on to direct some Will Rogers flicks, plays "Dizzy".

 

 

41. His Private Secretary (1933) -- John Wayne as a rich man's lazy son?  Ha!  Unbelievable!  This is a breezy one with Duke being extremely playful.  His old man doesn't approve of his wanting to marry, thinking the girl is Miss G.  It's all the way cute.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFlPFe0iviU

 

hisprivatesecretary1_zps6450ee49.jpg

 

42. We Were Strangers (1949) -- For some reason, I really struggle with revolutionary films.  I should have liked this one more, but I was mostly bored by it.  John Huston is the director.  I love him.  John Garfield and Jennifer Jones are two stars I like.  Gilbert Roland is someone I greatly enjoy.  So why the heck was I bored?  I think it was because we spend so much time plotting and then nothing goes off.  Even the ending was anticlimactic to me.  How it was presented didn't thrill me, either.  What I did like about the film was Pedro Armendariz.  Boy is he good.  Others seem to love John Ford's The Fugitive.  I don't.  Others seem to love Hitchcock's The Wrong Man.  I don't.  I'd place this film in their class.

 

wewerestrangers1_zps48bd7b32.jpg

 

wewerestrangers2_zps1ee448bd.jpg

 

43. The Hour Before the Dawn (1944) -- I watched this film for Veronica Lake and she's easily the best thing about this picture.  Veronica plays quite an interesting woman in this one.  She's devilish.  Hooray!  But she's on the quiet side of devilish for she has a hidden agenda during WWII.  I bet you can't guess what it is.  She ends up marrying Franchot Tone, a pacifist.  I bet you can't guess what he ends up doing.  Oh, Hollywood.

 

 

44. Caesar and Cleopatra (1945) -- Vivien Leigh as Cleopatra?  Sign me up!  The problem is, the film felt like "Caesar and Scarlett".  And as much as I love Viv as Scarlett, it doesn't work in this realm.  Claude Rains plays Caesar in the pic, so his pairing with Viv produces a father-daughter vibe.  That's not that interesting to me.  What really hurt the film with me is that it's full of inaction.  It basically sits there.  Poor Flora Robson is stuck in a role that sure seemed beneath the Queen.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgvOn7bFy7I

 

caesarandcleopatra1_zps20c0dc01.jpg

 

 

45. The Crowd Roars (1932) -- How could an auto racing film starring James Cagney, Joan Blondell, and Ann Dvorak and directed by Howard Hawks be so bland and boring?  The film is basically a brotherly film with Cagney disapproving of his younger brother's (Eric Linden) want to get into his racket of racing.  How the story unfolds feels hurried, like the film is a race to the finish.  Everything feels forced and is too tidy.  Oddly enough, Linden is also the young star in Ah, Wilderness!.  It's funny how unintended connections occur when watching film.

 

46. The Angel Wore Red (1960) -- Ava Gardner in a revolutionary film? I gotta see this! Uhhh, thank goodness Ava is around.  She makes the film watchable.  As the story goes, the Catholic priests are viewed as threats by the regime and are forced to go into hiding or risk being executed during the Spanish Civil War.  One of these priests on the run is Arturo (Dirk Bogarde).  He ends up meeting Soledad (Ava), a "performer".  The two form a bond and look to escape to freedom.  I continue to struggle with these revolutionary pics.  They always seem to be so dry.  Add in the boredom of religious characters, and I'm in serious trouble.  Ahhh, Ava.

 

47. The Amazing Adventure (1936) -- Cary Grant stars in this "wager" comedy about a bored rich guy who is bet by his doctor that he can't make it through a year working for a living.  Although I ranked this film lowly, there's nothing bad about it.  It's mostly enjoyable.  It's just that I found it lacking throughout and the message surely ain't gonna connect with me.  Ugh!

 

 

48. The Mysterious Mr. Wong (1934) -- I never knew Wallace Ford was such a prominent performer in the 30s.  I always thought he was a supporting player.  So seeing Wallace in these films has been quite a revelation for me.  He's fun.  Here he is playing a Lee Tracy kind of character, a wise-snapping reporter on the hunt for a story.  The guy he's chasing after is no other than Bela Lugosi, who is our titular character.  Bela is entertaining in this one, for he's up to no good.  My issues with the film are purely my own.  I struggle with the 30s blending of comedy and horror.  It hardly ever works with me. The Old Dark House is one that I like but such films are the exception.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWajE9EzReA

 

49. Night Flight (1933) -- When I saw a film with Clark Gable, Robert Montgomery, Myrna Loy, John Barrymore, and Lionel Barrymore, I thought I found a gem.  Well, there's a reason why this film isn't known despite its star-studded cast.  It's not that good.  What makes it a tough watch is how the story is told.  It was quite clear the stars just showed up for their scenes and that's it.  There is no interaction.  The film is completely segmented.  Dreadful.  The story sounds similar to Only Angels Have Wings in that pilots are asked to risk their lives with night-time flying.  Sounds thrilling.  Sigh.

 

50. There's No Business Like Show Business (1954) -- Aarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrgh!  The pain!  The pain of it all!  This is a torturous kind of Yankee Doodle Dandy.  The family performers going through the trials and tribulations of show business, but with a teen aspect to it all.  Blech!  What is Marilyn Monroe doing with Donald O'Connor?  Johnnie Ray as a priest?!  Where are we?!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey! Jack in the box!

 

I'm back!!

 

 

1. Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955) -- One of the best A&C films that I have seen.  I've always been a sucker for the Arabian settings, especially when mummies are involved.  I love A&C when there is danger involved and this one has a terrific mix of danger and laughs.  It also helps that Marie Windsor is on hand for some villainy.  She's excellent.  And is that Richard Deacon?!  Lots of fun.

 

A & C are always good fun!  I LOVE this one! You like Arabian settings? You totally left that out the last time I told you I loved anything with Egyptian settings silly!

 

abbottandcostellomeetthemummy2_zps685cb6

4. The Ex-Mrs. Bradford (1936) -- Typically, it's William Powell who steals a film.  Here, Jean Arthur outdoes him.  And for me to watch Powell and Arthur carrying on as they do is sheer delight. The film is basically a reversal of The Thin Man.  Instead of the perfect wife (Nora/Myrna Loy) helping Bill solve the crimes, we've got the meddling ex who is creating trouble more than anything for Bill.  That's where the comedy stems.  And I found Jean's meddlesome "Mrs. Bradford" to be a great deal of fun.  The actual mysteries found in the film aren't the strongest, but they are certainly passable.  An underrated film.

 

You beat me to this one! I still haven't seen it, but I have it recorded and am ready to watch it!

 

6. Two-Faced Woman (1941) -- Could this actually be a Sweet T suggestion checking in this high on my list?  What?!  Do you believe in miracles?  Yes!  I never heard of this film.  When I saw it starred Greta Garbo in a comedy with Melvyn Douglas, I became excited to see this one.  It doesn't disappoint.  Garbo and Melvyn have a whirlwind romance and get married on the quick.  Eventually, Melvyn returns to work and Garbo fears he is back with is old flame, Griselda (Constance Bennett).  In an attempt to figure things, Greta pretends to be her twin sister.  The comedy follows.  What I really loved about this film is that Greta seems to be parodying herself.  She's both funny and sexy at the same time.  It's remarkable.  Also, the zingers Connie Bennett tosses around are absolutely hilarious.  Her bitter jealousy had me rolling.  Roland Young is also quite funny.  This is an underrated comedy.

 

What do you mean it's a miracle? Pffttt! I knew you would like it! I'm not generally a huge fan of Garbo, but I REALLY like this one! Connie is the best!  When you pointed out that Garbo sort of parodies herself I giggled! That's part of the reason I like it.....Shhh that's our little secret. You said you didn't like Roland Young!

 

8. Cinderella (1950) -- Who knew this would be one of my favorite Disney princess films?  I really liked it.  I knew of the Cinderella story before watching the film but seeing how it was told was another thing.  I enjoyed the comedy.  There was a "Tom and Jerry" feel with the animals that I really liked.  I also liked the entire ball sequence.  I loved how it was shown.  And then the mad dash before the strike of midnight.  All done so well.  And the villainy of the stepmother was also quite good.  What's with you stepmothers always being evil, Quiet Gal? :D

 

You're looking for lots of trouble with that last statement. I think i'll take a step back and watch. heehee! I can't believe you actually watched Cinderella....and liked it. You realize this is perfect for blackmail right? Heehee! I like Gus personally!  Gus Gus is such a little cutie! Cinderelly Cinderelly....great now the song is in my head. Joe will love hearing that when he gets home.... :D:P I don't know if you realized this, but um.....there were musicals numbers in it. :D

 

12. The Egyptian (1954) -- I tend to worry about watching "epics" but the call of Gene Tierney made this a film I've been wanting to see.  It ends up winning with me.  And as lovely as Gene is in the film, it was Edmund Purdom who brings it through.  Purdom plays the lead, an idealistic doctor called "Sinuhe".  Sinuhe starts off well but he soon meets Miss Goddess (Bella Darvi) and his life starts to take a drastic turn.  Darn that Miss G and her wiles!  And Bella plays her as good as anyone. :P  From there, the film becomes a battle for power between the regime in power and the rebels.  All the while, a battle within Sinuhe rages.  Gene has a couple memorable scenes.  Jean Simmons plays a total sweetheart in the film.  She's a doll.  Victor Mature plays Sinuhe's friend in arms while Peter Ustinov is Sinuhe's under-handed loyal friend in rags.  Henry Daniell also plays an angel of a fella.  It's a pretty good film.

 

I find it funny that we watched this at almost the same time. I really liked Jean Simmons' character here. She is very courageous and fights for herself and those she loves. Peter Ustinov wins me over here. I don't usually seek him out in films, but he captured my attention.

 

The one big negative thing I have to say about this one is that when certain characters take a shot with archery, they have completely wrong form, they barely pull the string back more than an inch, and for the love of pete, they don't even hold the bow right and try to make it look convincing at all. But that is coming from a real archer, and it IS just a movie, so I guess I could let that one go. It is a really greatly filmed movie. :D:D It just happens to be a big pet peeve of mine in films....I mean at least Greer took lessons in Pride and Prejudice from the dude who taught Errol Flynn. That's my Greer! Heehee!

 

16. Ladies in Love (1936) -- A Sweet T suggestion that I ended up really liking a lot.  This is a good version of "Three Coins in the Fountain.  The story follows three women who are looking for love but each has a differing viewpoint on what kind of man they want and what constitutes happiness.  Yeah, this is completely Fox.  This is How to Marry a Millionaire and Three Coins in the Fountain.  What makes this film so much better with me is what happens to the women.  Who plays the women?  Loretta Young, Janet Gaynor, and Constance Bennett.  I loved them all.  There is also Simone Simon to spice things up.  She's great.  Who are the fellas?  Who cares!  All right, all right.  Tyrone Power, Don Ameche, Paul Lukas, and Alan Mowbray.  Yes, Alan Mowbray!  Amazing.  I like Janet and I typically love Connie, but it's Loretta who is best in this one.

 

Simone Simon did not spice things up! She ruined everything for Connie!! Heehee! Poor Loretta, she gets the worst end of the deal in this one.

 

20. Devil and the Deep (1932) -- Is it possible for a film to star both Gary Cooper and Cary Grant to have another player outshine them both?  The answer is yes.  For the star of this intriguing film is Charles Laughton, in his first American picture.  As the story goes, Laughton is a commander of a ship who is married to the restless and "imprisoned" Tallulah Bankhead.  Talk about a pair!  Tallulah is involved with a young lieutenant of her husband's (Cary) when another (Gary) shows up in his stead.  For an early-30s film, this one is rather psychological, which is what really had me liking it.  Laughton's actions and plight are great to watch.

 

I think Gary always shines! :D Charles Laughton is very talented. I think he did great here as well. I really wasn't expecting that for this particular film for some reason-maybe because of all of the other big names. Tallulah always leaves me flabbergasted. I can definitely say that much.

 

23. The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933) -- It's snippy Myrna Loy!  She at least starts out like Miss G.  But she changes.  This is another boxing film that ends up being good.  The formula is present.  A boxer ends up winning over a woman and climbs the ladder, only to get too big for his britches.  There's also the washed-up trainer who comes back for one more chance at the title.  It sure helps that he's played by Walter Huston.  What helps separate this particular boxing film from others is that many of the participants are actual boxers, including the lead, Max Baer.  In fact, Baer would end up fighting his opponent (Primo Carnera) in the film for the World Heavyweight title the following year.  Amazing.  Jack Dempsey also has a scene in the film and referees the main event.  And if all of that isn't enough, there's also a spurned power broker (Otto Kruger) to complicate matters.  All of it works.

 

I don't usually go for boxing movies with the exception of Jimmy Dolan and maybe....MAYBE Rocky. I even have mixed feeling with that one sometimes. I always just want to see the end scene where he shouts Adrien's name and then I want them to kiss. Is that too much to ask for? Heehee! Having said that, I actually enjoyed this pic! That says a lot for me. It has good characters and great leads!

 

24. Sleeping Beauty (1959) -- I would have liked this film a lot more it it didn't focus on the fairies the entire time!  Ugh!  But I do love Maleficient (Eleanor Audley).  She's frightening.  But who comes to the rescue?  Nooooooooooooooooooooooo!

 

I'd just like to throw out there that it's not always a bad thing for the prince to come along! Yes, it's a little cliché, however it's still cute!

 

26. Jesse James (1939) -- A pretty entertaining western, from start to finish.  The pairing of Tyrone Power with Henry Fonda is darn interesting.  The two are so different.  Henry is so serious and Ty is more devil-may-care.  I like the mixing of the two.  The casting of Brian Donlevy and John Carradine in critical roles was spot on.  You can't pick two better villains for this time period.  The strangest casting is Donald Meek as the ruthless railroad president.  That didn't add up.  Randolph Scott is also around, but he's caught in a "blah" role.  The James story is told in a fun way.  It's well done.

 

Why is this so low on your list? Even I liked this one!

 

33. A Damsel in Distress (1937) -- You can tell I'm a Fred Astaire convert because there isn't much to this story of impending marriage yet I was still charmed because of Fred.  The power of Fred.  Not to say that I wasn't pleased to see Joan Fontaine.  I also liked George Burns and Gracie Allen in this one.  Gracie was making me laugh.  Lord Marshmorton (Montagu Love), Joan's father, was a character that I enjoyed.  George Gershwin did the music, but since I rarely recall musical scores, it's hard for me to say if I liked it or not!

 

YAY!!! It's Freddy! If you really want to get technical. It wasn't really a musical score. It just had musical numbers in it. Heehee! Silly willy! I'm just saying! This is a really cute one. I like all of Fred's musicals!

comedians2_zps7bc3735e.jpg

 

36. Casino Royale (1967) -- There were times during this Bond spoof that I wanted to scream in frustration, most notably the scenes in Berlin.  Painful!  There were other times I found the film to be fun and funny.  Peter Sellers and David Niven go a long way with both.  The other saving grace for me is the sexuality.  It's way over-the-top.  I enjoyed that. Deborah Kerr is especially sexy in the film.  Yes, you heard me right.  Deborah Kerr!  What a lass!  The ending to this one is dreadful.

 

What's hilarious is that I knew you would say that about this film. I knew it would be annoying for you. It isn't exactly Top Secret!. :D The reason I even watch it is for Deborah too. When is she ever not beautiful? I mean come on!

 

50. There's No Business Like Show Business (1954) -- Aarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrgh!  The pain!  The pain of it all!  This is a torturous kind of Yankee Doodle Dandy.  The family performers going through the trials and tribulations of show business, but with a teen aspect to it all.  Blech!  What is Marilyn Monroe doing with Donald O'Connor?  Johnnie Ray as a priest?!  Where are we?!

 

Why did you even torture yourself with watching this?...Oh gee, I know, you watched it for MM didn't you? I kind of think MM's personality goes well with Donald in this one. I thought they looked cute together. If she had any other of her personalities from her different films, I would say otherwise, because that wouldn't work. You deserve that pain for watching this silly. :P

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Good day, SansFin! -- Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955) I like this movie but I have very odd feeling of it: it nearly seems to me that there is much more plot than is required of Abbott and Costello movie! Pick a pick breaks me up every time!

 

:D After watching some of the early A&C films that feature more singing, I loved watching them in just "their" film.  I also love these "danger" films of theirs compared to simply comedic situations.

 

The Ex-Mrs. Bradford (1936) I love this movie very much! William Powell is Nick Charles even when he is Dr. Lawrence Bradford. Jean Arthur has an energy which Myrna Loy lacks. 

 

I also loved this one.  You are right, Jean is full of great energy in this one.  She's pushing William Powell in every direction.  And I liked that a lot.

 

Fog Over Frisco (1934) I like this very much. It has much more energy than most movies of the genre of the era. It seems to me a slightly odd role for Bette Davis but that may be one reason I like it.

 

The character is more like Bette's characters to come than at the time.  She's a pip.  After the big reveal, the film loses its appeal to me.

 

Ladies in Love (1936) I found this an unusual offering of much-used storylines. 

 

Me, too.  I really liked it.  I love the actresses in the film and I like what happens to them.  I definitely like the ending.

 

The Mysterious Mr. Wong (1934) I love Bela Lugosi and so this movie is a natural for me! He is perfect in sophisticated ruthlessness.

 

This is another good Bela showing.  He does villainy so well.  Loved his duality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hiya, Movieman -- Really reaching out of the realms of regular viewing, huh? What an interesting list. Interesting enough that I haven't seen many here. This may be the list where I have seen the fewest yet.

 

Really?  There are more "smaller" pictures on the list, so it does make sense.

 

Of those I'll point to "The Ex-Mrs. Bradford" because you can't go wrong when Powell and Arthur are involved. It's a fine film.

 

You got it!  I was very pleased to watch them play together.  I haven't seen Jean so full of energy like this in a little while.

 

Then there is "The Courtship Of Eddie's Father." I really like it. Dina Merrill doesn't stand a chance in this one because who wouldn't want to marry Shirley Jones. (It's not really fair to Dina.) Ford may be a bit old but I think he does a terrific job as the exasperated father who would be perfectly happy making his own decisions if only people would let him. Ron Howard is great.

 

Dina was very attractive but her personality surely wasn't.  She sure loved being around little Ronnie. :D

 

My favorite line in the film is when he is at camp and discovers that girls really like money.

 

Ha!  That really was hilarious!  Instead of a gift, I'm just handing over money. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, James -- Well add me as a fan of The Ex-Mrs. Bradford.    This is a fine film and Powell and Arthur are great as a team.

 

Glad to know there is another fan of the film.  I enjoyed it a great deal.  The reason being was Jean.  She really brought the film to life.

 

I also found the comment about Loy as lacking the energy of Arthur in the The Thin Man movies of interest.   While I love the teaming of Powell and Loy I think the series of films would have been just as good with Arthur.   But then Arthur is my favorite female comic actor (one of the reasons being because she brings so much heart and warmth while still being very funny).

 

Myrna has a different vibe than Jean.  I happen to love both vibes.  Myrna's snobby, stuck-up style really works with Bill in their non-Thin Man flicks.  She's terrific.  As Nick & Nora, the two seem as one, which makes them nearly peerless.  Jean is like a ball of fire in The Ex-Mrs. Bradford; Bill really has his hands full.  I liked that change.

 

I like Jean, Carole, and Myrna for my favorite comedic actresses.  I'd probably go with Carole at the top.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hola, Laffite -- Long time, not talk!

 

Hi Scott, I see you have Jesse James (1939) on your list. I wrote about that one about a year ago down South on Western Rambles. You answered saying you hadn't seen it yet. I tried to find that post in order to refresh my memory but couldn't find it.

 

Great!  I'll attempt to seek it out.

 

I remember liking it a lot. I'm not a Tyrone Power fan but he was fine here. I'm very much a Fonda fan and he was good as well. I remember thinking that they could have switched roles and the movie would not suffer (but Power was fine.)

 

I do like both actors but for different reasons. Power is the likable chap who usually pulls me in with his sunny smile and charisma.  I like Fonda for his seriousness.  It's hard to find an actor who does dramas any better than Henry.  And I do agree with you, I thought the two worked well together.

 

The actress playing Jesse's wife was especially good as I remember, she communicated the angst of that particular character very well.

 

Nancy Kelly, who plays the mother in The Bad Seed, played Jesse's wife.  She was pretty good, you are right.  I like her name, too: Zerelda (Zee).

 

I seem to recall a big name actor in a smaller role, a lawman who crosses over to be a help to Jesse (sorry, I should look some of this up).

 

Yes, Randolph Scott.

 

Great color, and a very realistic finish. One of the better of all the James' films, maybe the best.

 

I loved the color of the film.  It's a vibrant western.  I tend to prefer westerns that are more moody and dark, but the color works for this film and the period it was made.  Jesse James and Stagecoach in 1939.  Good ol' John Carradine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

G'day, Ma Stone -- I have not seen too many on your latest list.. but there are a few that I have seen:

 

It was a list that was a bit off the beaten path.

 

Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955)  Pretty sure I have seen it when I was a kid.. always fun to see those two in all their antics, but not really remembering much other than.. ha.. Bud and Lou.. and there was a mummy. :D

 

That's all you need to know!  You can't beat that. :D

 

Blithe Spirit (1945)  I have not seen this movie in years but I did enjoy it. (saw it as a play decades ago when I was a kid, long before I saw the movie and liked that better, probably.. but the film was fun, as I recall) 

 

I was surprised to like it as much as I did.  It was charming.  Loved the two wives.

 

Casino Royale (1967)  Oh my golly.. ha.. I saw this film in of all places JR HIGH (they showed it in a "study hall" over a couple of days.. can you believe it??? Ha)

 

Say what?!  That's insane!  It's loaded with sexuality!

 

That is the last and only time I think I ever saw it, but I remember being appalled at some of the humor (ha.. even way back then) but I DO remember thinking parts of it were funny.. but then.. of course.. I was like.. 11. Ha.. so funny COULD be a relative term.

 

Ha!  I loved reading the word "appalled"!  You sound like your daughter.  I wonder why. :D

 

I don't think it would be one I would enjoy much NOW.. but I just remember my friends and I cracking up at some of it way back when. I can picture you like this one.. even in all it's silliness. :D

 

I was mostly annoyed by the film.  For a comedy, I thought it misfired a lot.

 

Cinderella (1950)  Used to be the kidling's favorite princess.. if not her favorite princess movie. Until.. well.. she eventually had to "Let it go" Ha! 

 

Frozen is pretty good, but I like Cinderella even more.

 

The Courtship of Eddie's Father (1963)  Probably my favorite out of your most current list I l-o-v-e LOVE this movie.. have seen it over the years and every time I enjoy it more. 

 

I'm looking to be in the minority with this one.  Is it because y'all like cute kids?

 

Heat Lightning (1934)   Saw this several years ago and wish I could remember more about it. I DO remember enough to recall it was a very twisty-turny sort of story.(and I mean that in a good way) and I recall just being pretty amazed by Aline MacMahon.. she was really something in this one, wasn't she? I imagine this one scored well for you.. but I am never any good at guessing.. so I could be wrong. 

 

No, you are right.  It scored pretty well with me.  Not the best of stories, but I really liked Aline and what she goes through. I loved her returning to what she used to, only to be let down again. That made the film for me.

 

I Want to Live! (1958)  Saw it a very long time ago.. very grueling, as I recall. 

 

I was expecting it to be more grueling than it was.  Susan Hayward brings the film to life with her defiance and then hopelessness.

 

Sleeping Beauty (1959)  Probably one of my less liked Disney princess stories. (the fairies do it in for me.. blech) I like it well enough, I guess,  but the kidling is a big fan. 

 

Amazing!  We are actually right in tune with this one.  My feelings are precisely yours.  The fairies kill me, too.  They are the dwarfs!

 

A Stolen Life (1946)  One of two movies where Bette plays twins.. I can't even say for sure how much I like this one because I don't remember as much about this one as I do the other one (Dead Ringer.. which I did enjoy) but I DO remember the Carol Burnett "take off" of it better.. ha.

 

I just watched "A Swiped Life".  Hilarious!  Loved it!  I was eating up Carol playing Bette Davis as "Vera". Loved how she nailed her inflections.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


© 2019 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...