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The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

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And such a sweet lass to dance with

 

Yes.. ha. And her favorite song to dance to is always "Save the Last Dance for Me" 

:D

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Somebody has their own dancing shoes on tonight! Lots of silliness! I like it!

 

I'm actually a part of the modern world tonight. For the first time, I'm posting on the board via my phone while lounging on my couch. Ahhhh, the super laziness of modernity.

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Somebody has their own dancing shoes on tonight!

 

Not me.. ha. I have two left feet. I never dance.. I just sort of sway, maybe. Of course that part COULD be due to old age setting in. I am not as steady on my feet as I used to be. HA) :D 

 

I'm actually a part of the modern world tonight. For the first time, I'm posting on he board via my phone while lounging on my couch. Ahhhh, the super laziness of modernity. 

 

Posting on the internet by phone????  What next.. pretty soon, you'll be telling me people can take pictures with those things.. ha. (kidding!!!!!!!! I am at least not THAT technophobic. ha). But I do think I am probably about the last person on the planet who does not use their phone for anything but talking.. ha. I don't even text.. ever. In fact.. I have texting blocked on my phone so people can't even text me.  (I know.. how un-modern of me.. ha) 

 

I won't get a "smart phone" ha. I am afraid I am too dumb to figure it out.. so I just have a pretty basic nothing fancy flip phone. It does have a camera.. but I don't take many pictures only maybe a handful, just for wallpaper (because I am too cheap to buy one of those cable thingies to download them on to my computer) :D  

 

Having said that.. I will say, though, that i am with you. We got this laptop about 3 years ago (maybe?) and it has changed my life!! ha. (sitting on the couch?? With my feet propped up??  While on the internet??? Woo! It's the greatest invention since sliced bread!!) :D

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Heck, I just got a cell phone, for goodness sake. 


 


Well, it's nice to know I am ahead of SOMEBODY with that. ha. (I figured I was the last hold out 13 years ago.. who knew??) We got rid of our land line about 10 years ago and have just gone strictly w/ the cell phone. So mine gets a lot of use.. as it is also our "home phone" but I just do not care to use it for anything other than a phone.  


 


And I never text, either.


 


Well it's good to know I am NOT the last person on the planet afterall. ha .Who knows if I will ever give in and become a "texter" I don't THINK I ever will.. but then I can remember less than 15 years ago rolling my eyes at the very thought of having a mobile phone. "I'm not a doctor, or the president. Nobody needs to reach me that urgently.. and I don't need to call them either" ha. (boy.. look at me eating my words on THAT. Ha.)  Now days I use my phone everywhere I go. No..  I don't talk ALL the time on it.. but when I do need (or want) to talk, I can talk.. and I don't have to be home.. or find a pay phone to call someone. I can even call in my car, if I have to. (another thing I SWORE I would never be "important' enough to do.. ha. But now.. I confess.. I MUST be that important.. ha. Because I do make and take some calls in my car, now and then) Oh me.. how did this ever happen.  But hey.. I still only use it for the important stuff.. You know.. like when I am driving home, twenty five miles from my house. I can order a pizza and it will get there almost the same time I do. HA! :D


 


So texting.. hmm. Who knows. I still don't THINK I will ever be a texter.. but it might be the wave of the future, ha. Or rather I should say.. the future is now.. because everyone seems to be texting, everywhere I go..  except you and ME.. ha. :D We are the last two hold outs.


 


But wait.. isn't posting on the internet from your phone SORT of like texting??? Hmmm.... I suddenly feel so alone. :D


 


Oh wait.. I know there is at least ONE other person on the planet who will NEVER text.. ever. (even if I suddenly lose my mind and start texting)


 


The QT. :D


 


(of course.. I used to say that about him and the computer too.. and now he is a web surfing junkie.. ha. So anything is possible.)   :D


 


Have you seen The Twonky?


 


I have not seen it. I do know Miss G has mentioned it several times and I thought once I would check it out, but for some reason I never did. (I think it scares me.. ha) Maybe??? :D


 


Well, Jabez.. I am calling it a night. Don't stay out TOO late dancing.. you have to get all rested up before your hanging.. ha. (the frozen rope will only stay frozen so long.. and then I either have to use it or put it back in the freezer) :D


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You had a cell phone 13 years ago and got rid of your land line 10 years ago?  That's actually ahead of the curve.  That's pretty impressive.

 

I was completely teasing you with the texting. I text... a lot.  And I won't say with who. :D  You would be fine with it.  In fact, you would really like it.

 

You would enjoy The Twonky.  I highly suggest you watch it.

 

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Ha.. I was editing my post to say I was hitting the hay.. just as  you posted. :D

 

You had a cell phone 13 years ago and got rid of your land line 10 years ago?  That's actually ahead of the curve.  That's pretty impressive.

 

Don't be TOO impressed.. it was my tightfisted tendency that made me decide to do it.. ha. I was tired of the cost of the landline. We live in an area that is pretty much on the "edge" of our area for long distance.. and back in the day we always had to look for the best calling plans, etc, for our landline phone just to call someone five miles away. (let alone five thousand miles away) Pretty much every call I made (other than the neighbor down the street) was costing us for long distance. So we decided to go with the cell phone.. and it was cheaper. So that was the major reason. Not so impressive as it sounded now, is it. ha. 

 

I text... a lot.  And I won't say with who.

 

Agh! Just don't tell me it is the QT. If I find out he is texting behind my back and I really am the last person on the planet who doesn't text.. aghhhh!!! :D


You would be fine with it.  In fact, you would really like it.

 

Nope.. I bet  you are wrong about that. I actually have watched people at restaurants and in other public places sitting there ignoring their families.. texting. It sort of makes me sad. I think I spend more time online than I should already.. I just have to have SOME place where I draw the line and not let technology in.. that is where the line is drawn for now. (I also do not let the kidling use her tablet or watch her portable DVD player in the car for the same reason. We have some of our best chats in the car, driving down the road. Think of all the conversations with my daughter that I would have missed if I had allowed her that option to "tune out" and just soak her brain in technology instead of interacting with another person right in front of her.  

 

Ok.. I am off of my soapbox.. for now. :D

 

You would enjoy The Twonky.  I highly suggest you watch it.

 

But it might scare me.. ha. (should I keep the lights on.. should I have a blanket to pull over my head?? I might need to go back and get one of the kidlings stuffed puppies to hold while I watch it. :D

 

Oh boy.. I am going to be sleeping with the lights on for WEEKS after this one, I just know it. ha. :D

 

Ok.. NOW I am going to call it a night.. I really do need to get off of here. Pleasant dreams, Jabez.

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After Office Hours (1935)

Gable and Connie, right? I don't remember terribly much, just a typically enjoyable pre-code made better by Gable's presence.

 

Blossoms in the Dust (1941)

Not a great film but touching. Marsha Hunt's story was very surprising.

 

The Brothers Karamazov (1958)

One of the better book adaptations even though none of the brothers looked like they could possibly have had the same mother. Yul's Dimitri is delicately balanced between passion and sensitivity. Captain Kirk being saintly is questionable but how handsome he was then. I love Doestoyevsky.

 

 

Cleopatra (1934)

I was underwhelmed. Wanted to like it more. I prefer Elizabeth's or even Vivien's kittenish queen of the Nile.

 

Danger Signal (1945)

Sounds familiar. Raft?

 

The Dark Past (1948)

Another vaguely familiar title--- is this the remake of the movie about the hostages with the shrink analyzing their captor? Lee J. again?

 

Designing Woman (1957)

I like it ok. Peck isn't very funny to me, though.

 

Employees' Entrance (1933)

Good precode, one of those delightfully wolfish performances by Warren William.

 

The Farmer's Daughter (1947)

When I'm not distracted by Loretta's Princess Leia hairdo I enjoy it, mostly for Bickford and Ethel. When it gets political it goes south for me. And Loretta is just too sexless here. Don't think it Oscar worthy.

 

Father of the Bride (1950)

I'm one of the few that don't care much for it, despite adoring all three leads. It's a bit too smug, especially Joan's vapid mother.

 

 

Gigi (1958)

Simply my favorite musical. Perfectly cast. Chevalier is glorious. It often stirs up the Puritan in many Ameticans. It amazingly preserves Collette 's insouciance. How did Hollywood do that?! By using no Americans I guess, lol.

I also adore the songs. I wonder how Audrey was in the original play.

 

The Gilded Lily (1935)

Another title I recognize but can't recall the story or stars.

 

High Pressure (1932)

Powell was so marvelously energetic in these years, playing lovely rascals.

 

I'll Be Seeing You (1944)

I really like this film. In fact, I think I opened my Rambles thread with a post about it. Anyway I remember writing a bit on it, I still consider it underrated, seldom mentioned among wartime movies. Yet it has to be among the earliest to deal sensitively with "shell shock". I like that both Cotten and Ginger are trapped by Shame into lying to each other.

 

I Met My Love Again (1938)

Another that only rings a bell...

 

In the Good Old Summertime (1949)

Don't like it. The opposite type of musical subject to Gigi. Blahhhhh.... I rarely respond to Americana in musical form for some reason. I like it in drama.

 

I Take This Woman (1940)

I'm impressed by both the story (except the last big with the kids ) and the performances. Hedy is sweet and lost and Spence is just so good at being good---without being a bore or seeming like a wimp.

 

Johnny Angel (1946)

Is this Raft again ? If it's the one I think I enjoyed it but can't remember the plot!

 

The Last Gangster (1937)

Love from a Stranger (1937)

Man on a Tightrope (1953)

Having major brain lapse on these...I know I know them, just can't remember a darn thing about them.

 

Man-Proof (1938)

Myrna trying to be " modern" again? :D

She's so fun to watch in the thirties. Can do no wrong.

Marriage on the Rocks (1965)

Love Frank and Deborah but they deserved better than this. (Especially after their From Here to Eternity roles).

 

Mourning Becomes Electra (1947)

Maybe so, but she bored me.

Though I loved your description of this and Ambersons, Ro! Lol. They are two screwed up families, ha.

But I love Ambersons. For the sense of loss.

 

Murder by Television (1935)

Hilarious title! I feel this way when forced to watch The View or reality shows.

 

Nightmare (1956)

Sigh. Can't remember this one either.

 

The Sisters (1938)

Errol and Bette? Underwhelming. Errol was good though.

 

Something Wild (1961)

Apt title. It fascinates and repels. Ultimately she's victimized as much by her mother and her "savior" as by her assailant.

 

The Steel Trap (1952)

Joe Cotten heist film? Not bad. Some decent suspense.

 

23 Paces to Baker Street (1956)

I really like everything about it. Nice seeing Van out of his element, as in The End of the Affair which I liked less .

 

The Twonky (1953)

Adorable!!!! I want one. :)

 

The Virginian (1929)

Not as good as I remember but it's all there, Cowboy Coop. I saw the Bill Pullman version with Diane Lane that Chris mentioned. I'm sure I saw Joel's, too, but neither thrilled me.

 

Walk East on Beacon! (1952)

Whirlpool (1934)

Woman in the Shadows (1934)

Pretty sure I never saw these--- what are they about?

 

I can't imagine you liked any of these! Maybe I'll Be Seeing You.

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I hope to reply to everyone tomorrow evening.  I hope!

 

1. Gigi (1958) -- In a serious upset, this was my favorite film of the bunch.  Oh that Maurice Chevalier.  He can do no wrong with me.  Of the musicals I have seen, this is the one where I have liked the songs the very most.  I loved three of the songs, and the rest were quite good, too.  Leslie Caron is sweet and adorable, of course.  So playful.  I also liked Louis Jourdan.  He possesses a good screen presence.  I liked his being bored.  Isabel Jeans as "Aunt Alicia" was a trip.  Just a fun, light, lovely picture.

 

gigi2_zps9c4b1bc4.jpg

 

2. Charlie Chan at the Wax Museum (1940) -- One of the better "Charlie Chan" films.  As many Chan pics do, this one has many suspects and a couple red herrings.  It's how all of this comes together that makes it better than most.  The setting also goes a long way towards making this appealing, as it does take place in a wax museum.  Also, there is a plastic surgeon involved, which means our suspect has changed his or her identity.  Lots of interesting developments.

 

 

3. Something Wild (1961) -- You won't find many films similar to this one.  The opening to this film sets its uneasy mood. Add to that a heavy silence and you are in a serious mood picture.  I liked all of that.  From there, it only gets stranger and stranger.  Once our protagonist, Mary Ann (Carroll Baker), meets Mike (Ralph Meeker), all bets are off.  What develops is a curious kind of relationship.  Is it love?  You would have to watch this one to see what I'm talking about.  Yes, I'm being very vague with this film because what happens is so very different  But I certainly don't recommend this one to everyone.  I do like my fellow Keystoner, Carroll.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_SFvOiE0e8.

 

4. The Virginian (1929) -- What they say about this western is true: it's the archetype for some of the greatest westerns to come.  A very youthful and seriously made-up Gary Cooper stars as "The Virginian", a cowhand who rides on the good side of the law.  His good friend Steve (Richard Arlen) sees greener pastures in dirty fields, thus he finds himself at odds with his pal.  Then there's the black hat in town, Trampas (Walter Huston).  He's running afoul and he doesn't care who knows about it.  Mary Brian plays Coop's love interest, a school teacher.  Yeah, she's a "Clementine".  The script is familiar but how it's visually shown by Victor Fleming shows some early creativity that would come to influence the western genre.

 

 

5. Age of Consent (1969) -- In some ways, this film plays as a "mermaid" picture. Brad Morahan (James Mason) is a successful but bored artist who is seeking happiness in his life via a "reclusive" escape.  He soon runs into the youthful Cora (Helen Mirren), who is seeking her own escape.  The two form a bond.  The crossing of paths of director Michael Powell and Helen Mirren is fascinating.  One is at the very end of a decorated film career and the other is beginning their decorated career.  While there is plenty of nudity in the picture, it all plays very innocent.  The film is actually rather sweet and loving.  If only other classic films had this much nudity.  Just imagine how much better they would be. :P

 

ageofconsent1_zpsdf135ec0.jpg

 

ageofconsent2_zps2d135ac2.jpg

 

6. High Pressure (1932) -- What a delight this film is!  William Powell is as sharp as ever in this one.  Powell plays "Gar Evans", a fast-talking "promoter" who can make money simply with an idea thanks to his wits and persuasive charm.  His latest scam, I mean, business venture is a synthetic rubber.  Does it really exist?  Does it really matter?  This is Powell's show, all the way.  He's simply marvelous.  George Sidney provides plenty of comedy, too, as " 'Colonel' Ginsburg".  There's just one thing that can unravel Powell's plans.  That would be a woman.  Darn you women!  Why must you be so alluring? Evelyn Brent plays "Francine", the woman that bedevils Powell.  She's got some "Miss G" in her.

 

7. The Verdict (1946) -- Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre are back together again!  And they are having some fun in this murder mystery.  Sydney plays a Scotland Yard detective who loses his job after sending an innocent man to his death.  Another case soon arises that hits close to home.  Can he solve this one privately or will his replacement continue to make him look like a chump?  Sydney is at top form in this one, as is Peter, who is highly engaging.  A fun, little film noir.  It's very tidy.

 

8. Love from a Stranger (1937) -- What a surprise this little film ended up being!  Ann Harding with Basil Rathbone!  Woohoo!  It's a story about a woman who wins the lottery and then falls for this stranger, me, played by Basil Rathbone.  He captures my loving nature so very well. :D  Just don't go in that basement!  That's my room!  This film is somewhat similar to Fritz Lang's Secret Beyond the Door, just not as deep and messy.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMI5rRLD0_A

 

9. Cleopatra (1934) -- Is that Claudette Colbert?!  Really?!  Why... she's sexy!  I enjoyed this telling of Cleo.  Not only is Claudette sexy in this one, she's also lots of fun.  She has such great energy.  I also liked the sets a great deal.  The film just looks terrific.  Warren William is "Julius Caesar".  Warren William?!  Now that's delicious.  I'd say this version is more about presentation than anything and I really liked its presentation.

 

cleopatra1_zpsffd591a7.jpg

 

cleopatra4_zps7a44a404.jpg

 

10. Abbott and Costello Meet the Invisible Man (1951) -- A very entertaining A&C.  I really do like them in the 50s.  Very funny.  The stories are actually present, too.  Here, Bud and Lou are detectives who encounter an "invisible man" (Arthur Franz), who is seeking to prove his innocence.  The man is also a boxer, so we get to see Lou don the trunks and fight a heavyweight match with his help. The boxing setting really lends credence to the story.  Sheldon Leonard and Adele Jergens provide some gravitas to the film.  I feel this one of the best of A&C.

 

11. The Twonky (1953) -- I don't know what to make of this one!  It plays like a Twilight Zone episode.  I surely get the commentary on television and its threat to radio and movies.  And it definitely proved to be very correct.  We have become slaves to television.  "I have no complaints."  I just love how wild and quirky this picture is.  So much bizarre fun!  But when it comes to making much sense, well...

 

 

12. Man on a Tightrope (1953) -- If ever there was a film that was very "Elia Kazan", this could be it.  The basis of the story is freedom from government oppression.  It's very anti-Communism.  The star of the show is Fredric March, who is the owner of a traveling circus troupe in Czechoslovakia.  He and his fellow performers are looking to flee the country in the hopes of freedom.  Gloria Grahame plays March's wandering wife.  Terry Moore is his daughter, who is in love with Cameron Mitchell, a performer March disapproves of.  Alexander D'Arcy, Adolphe Menjou, and Richard Boone all have memorable turns in the film.  The film plays like an espionage version of The Greatest Show on Earth.  I found it rather engrossing and well made.

 

13. Nightmare (1956) -- I really like this story.  It just so happens that I like the first version of this one a little more.  That one is called Fear in the Night and was directed by the same fella who directed this one, Maxwell Shane.  Odd.  The biggest difference between the two films is the inclusion of a star in this one: Edward G. Robinson.  The first one was pretty star-less.  Paul Kelly was the biggest name.  The story is about a man who dreams he has murdered another man in a strange looking closet, only to awaken and find evidence that his dream could actually be reality.  The paranoia builds from there.  Kevin McCarthy plays the paranoid in this version while Eddie G. is his brother-in-law detective.  Can they unravel the truth?

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jy29YfMyHrw

 

14. I'll Be Seeing You (1944) -- I really like damaged love stories and this is a very good one.  Zachary (Joseph Cotten) and Mary (Ginger Rogers) meet cute and become smitten with each other.  Unbeknownst to the other, both are dealing with personal demons and secrets.  Can they trust the other to love them knowing the difficult truths about them?  This is a lovely World War II love story.  It has an ominous vibe but it's set in such a sweet world.  The Marshall home provides such security from the real world.  The Marshalls are played by Tom Tully, Spring Byington, and Shirley Temple.  They are relatives of Mary.  In some ways, this can be seen as a companion piece to Shadow of a Doubt.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zX_GTeG8-1Y

 

15. Johnny Angel (1946) -- The setting of the docks and an abandoned ship really added a lot to this film for me.  I just loved the atmosphere.  Secondly, there is the cast.  George Raft is the lead.  He's attempting to figure out who murdered his father, a ship's captain.  This is the kind of role I really like George in.  Then there are the women.  You get Claire Trevor and Signe Hasso.  Claire is duplicitous, which is always fun in film noir.  Signe is the innocent woman who is also seeking some truths.  Hoagy Carmichael is also given a good deal of screen time as the info man on the street.  This is a quality mystery film noir.

 

16. Mourning Becomes Electra (1947) -- Quiet Gal is right, this one is a train wreck.  It's totally fascinating but also hard to completely like.  Talk about an uneasy feeling.  It's amazing how incestuous it is.  Even the whole idea of the mother and daughter loving the same man.  It's crazy!  Still, I was mostly entertained.  It had a Tennessee Williams feel to it.  And I can't believe it, but it's actually messier than his plays!  Katina Paxinou is the one I liked the very most.  She was stellar as the matriarch.  Rosalind Russell certainly goes through the changes.  I liked her in the first half, but the second half had me not enjoying her much.  Michael Redgrave mostly annoyed me.

 

17. 23 Paces to Baker Street (1956) -- A blind Van Johnson overhears a deadly plot at a pub and this leads him to wonder, "who are these people and how I can protect the person in danger?".  The set-up is excellent and the adventure and mystery that follows pretty much matches it.  It's rather entertaining.  The ending is far-fetched, but still good enough.  Henry Hathaway is such an underrated director.  Van is once again very good.  He's a likable chap.  Vera Miles plays the woman in his life.  I do like Vera.

 

18. The Brothers Karamazov (1958) -- This film reminded me of House of Strangers and Broken Lance.  It's all about a patriarch and his four sons, all with their strengths and weaknesses in character.  Lee J. Cobb plays the father.  Yeah, he's very "Lee".  The boys are William Shatner (as a monk, no less), Richard Basehart (the intellectual non-believer), Albert Salmi (the none-so-bright half-brother), and our star, Yul Brynner, the adventurous military man with some "rascal" in him.  Added to the mix are Maria Schell and Claire Bloom, both of whom are love interests of Dmitri (Yul).  Maria plays Grushenko, a party girl with a bit of a secret.  Claire plays Miss Goddess Katya, a girl of money that is betrothed to Dmitri.  Ohhhh, Miss G.  Whose side will ye be on? :D  What I liked most about this film are the dynamics in play, Yul, and his relationships with Claire and Maria.  Yul is magnificent.  He's such a great actor.

 

Spanish subtitles on the screen:

 

 

brotherskaramazov1_zps21b66bfb.jpg

 

19. Whirlpool (1934) -- I feel this one is a sleeper film.  Jack Holt, a guy I just met and he immediately shows up again, plays a carnival man who gets sent up the river for a manslaughter charge.  It turns out his wife is pregnant with their child.  Feeling bad for her and her future, he creates a circumstance to free her.  Years later, Jack is a free man and his past presents itself again.  What to do?  Jean Arthur is the female star of this picture.  She is very much "Jean": full of great life and humor.  But this film turns dramatic.  Just an interesting film.

 

20. Torchy Blane in Chinatown (1939) -- Someone is making threats to individuals who are in possession of jade tablets.  If they do not surrender these tablets, they will be met with death.  And so the bodies start to pile up.  This is rather shocking for a Torchy picture.  The resolution isn't the best, but the journey features some good tension.  I really liked this Torchy entry.

 

21. Danger Signal (1945) -- Does anyone play a snake better than Zachary Scott?  Boy is he good.  Here, Zach is up to his tricks again.  He has designs on Hilda (Faye Emerson) until her younger sister Anne (Mona Freeman) returns home from school.  Oh, that devil.  The film has hints of Shadow of a Doubt.  It's a rather decent little film noir.

 

22. The Farmer's Daughter (1947) -- The mixing of romance and politics worked for me in this sweet film.  While the story is rather silly, including Loretta Young's accent, the idealism of the film won me over.  I like Katrin's (Loretta Young) "for the people" politics.  I also liked her "do everything" woman.  She could pretty much do it all.  Joseph Cotten plays the congressman who falls for Katrin's sweet honesty.  Ethel Barrymore plays Cotten's mother, the widow of a great politician.  She is a power player in the party and this plays into Katrin's future.  Charles Bickford as a butler?  It actually works.  He's good.  And check out Loretta's brothers in the film: Lex Barker, Keith Andes, and James Arness.  Talk about some brawn.

 

23. Two Girls and a Sailor (1944) -- I actually liked this Sweet T fluffer!  It kind of reminded me of Xanadu.  Two sisters (June Allyson and Gloria DeHaven) form a song-and-dance act who dream of finding the right man.  So very "Sweet T". :P  They also long to open their own club, one to entertain the troops.  They have a secret admirer who treats them to flowers and other things.  Who is this mysterious fella?  While I still haven't warmed up to June, I did like Gloria in this one.  She's cute.  Jimmy Durante provides comic relief and Gracie Allen has a funny number.

 

24. In the Good Old Summertime (1949) -- Since this is a musical remake of The Shop Around the Corner, I immediately like the story.  That's the good thing.  But it's not on the level of Ernst Lubitsch's film.  The romance isn't as good.  The other characters are not as good.  The story is unfocused and lacks drama.  This is a lighter telling.  I also thought the songs were just there for Judy Garland.  They really didn't fit into the actual story.  I did like Van Johnson.

 

inthegoodoldsummertime1_zps69d82f22.jpg

 

inthegoodoldsummertime2_zps4c357f72.jpg

 

25. Man-Proof (1938) -- Myrna Loy, how lovely and fun you are.  Here, Myrna is madly in love with Walter Pidgeon.  Uh-huh, Walt.  Ol' "pipe and slippers".  But Walter decides to marry Rosalind Russell, thus sending Myrna spiraling.  Meanwhile, there is her annoying friend, played by Franchot Tone.  Franchot has a thing for Myrna but he has such a vicious tongue that he often irritates and angers Myrna to no end.  Sounds like a relationship I know!  How does this mess all work out?  I found the film to be pretty good.  The cast is superb, of course.  But it's Myrna and Franchot's show.

 

26. I Met My Love Again (1938) -- Even though this film places middling on my list, I was rather fascinated by it.  The story is about two sweethearts (Henry Fonda and Joan Bennett) who seem destined to marriage until something gets in the way.  From there, their lives take two very different paths.  Eventually, they run into each other years later.  Do they still love each other?  Henry is very bookish in this one.  Joan is a peach.  Louise Platt plays a love interest of Hank's and Dame May Whitty is Joanie's aunt (mother figure).

 

27. The Gilded Lily (1935) -- Fred MacMurray plays my kind of fella in this one.  He sits with his shoes off on a park bench and eats a bag of popcorn on nearly a daily basis.  His "pal" on some of these days is Marilyn (Claudette Colbert).  The two get along swimmingly.  But do they love each other?  Enter Ray Milland, his Lordship.  Could his looks, charms, and status win the heart of Marilyn?  This triangle film is light and easy, and mostly pleasing.  Claudette has a funny scene at a nightclub where she's the starring act.

 

gildedlily1_zps82af5ca4.jpg

 

28. Behind the Mask (1932) -- A surprisingly entertaining film with a lead I never heard of.  That lead would be Jack Holt, who plays an undercover federal agent on the trail of smugglers.  Boris Karloff plays one of the smuggler's henchmen.  Constance Cummings is the love interest.  How does our agent have time to find romance while doing all this?  Welcome to Hollywood!

 

29. I Met Him in Paris (1937) -- Kind of a screwball comedy version of Design for Living.  Kay Denham (Claudette Colbert) looks to escape her humdrum world, so she runs off to Paris.  There, she meets George (Melvyn Douglas) and Gene (Robert Young), two good friends.  The three end up spending all their time together.  George is unsure with the ladies while Gene is a playboy.  Lots of "one-upmanship" in this one.  While the film never truly comes together for me, I was entertained throughout.

 

30. The Dark Past (1948) -- This is a remake of the 1939 film Blind Alley, starring Ralph Bellamy.  It's about an escaped criminal (William Holden) and his gang who hold a family and their party guests hostage.  The twist is that the home is that of a psychologist, whom piques the interest of the nightmare-fueled criminal.  I prefer the earlier film.  I like Bellamy as the shrink more so than Lee J. Cobb, who is the doc here.  Nina Foch plays the moll.  She's great.  I also like Ann Dvorak in the earlier pic.  I really didn't like Holden in this kind of role.  It just didn't feel right.  It's why the film didn't score well for me.  I like Chester Morris much more in the 1939 flick.

 

31. The Last Gangster (1937) -- I'm not surprised to find out that Edward G. Robinson is the "last gangster".  But how in the world did James Stewart end up here?!  It's pretty darn amazing to see Jimmy gunning down the coppers with his Tommy gun.  Shocking!  I think that happens in this one. :D  As the story goes, Eddie G. is sent up and it turns out his wife (Talya Krozac, who?) is pregnant with his son.  Years go by and Eddie gets out of prison and looks to find his boy.  How will he be accepted?  The plot is somewhat similar to Whirlpool, the film above.  This one isn't too bad.  It's a nice change-of-pace role for Eddie.  Lionel Stander and John Carradine are quite good in support.

 

32. Marriage on the Rocks (1965) -- There's a lot not to like about this one.  Frank Sinatra as a hard-working executive who doesn't have time for love-making?  Hmmmm... Deborah Kerr as his wife?  Huh?  Then there's the dancing scenes.  Painful.  This is the kind of 60s comedy that grates me on after a while.  On the plus side, Deborah is once again looking awfully sexy.  I also liked Dean Martin as Frank's bachelor buddy and Hermione Baddeley as Frank's mother-in-law.  Joi Lansing was cute, too.  But the entire switcheroo in this one sends it down the drain.

 

33. Blossoms in the Dust (1941) -- While this story isn't necessarily my kind of story, I do find this to be arguably Greer Garson's best performance.  She is terrific.  Greer plays "Edna Gladney", a Texan who opens an orphanage.  I didn't know Texan women could be so nice.  That hasn't been my experience. :P  What I usually dislike about films such as this is that our protagonist has to suffer through countless tragedies.  That always drives me nuts.  "Then, one day, she walked outside with her child and a tornado sneaked around the corner and swept her child away.  While grieving, her husband is eaten by alligators in the living room."  I did like the ending to this film.  It's very good.

 

blossomsinthedust1_zps16dc0038.jpg

 

34. Please Murder Me (1956) -- Angela Lansbury being naughty.  That's usually a very good thing.  Here, it's an okay thing.  And, in a turn of events, Raymond Burr is not a baddie here.  No.  He's Perry Mason.  Well, sort of.  I don't know if Perry would find himself in this position or not.  Oh that Angela.  There isn't much depth to this one.  It's mostly game playing.  This makes the film an average programmer.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rag7wnYzcVA

 

35. The Phantom Fiend (1932) -- Alfred Hitchcock fans may be familiar with the name of Ivor Novello.  Ivor is the star of Hitch's silent The Lodger. Well, this is a talkie remake of The Lodger.  And, it's pretty solid.  In fact, I like the ending to this one.  Elizabeth Allan plays Ivor's object of desire.  Elizabeth was an actress with some allure during these years.  I like her.  Also, you will find a very young Jack Hawkins.  For me to see Jack here after watching Gideon of Scotland Yard late last year was rather incredible.

 

 

36. After Office Hours (1935) -- A very "30s" picture that attempts to combine a murderous plot with a romance.  It feels very disjointed.  The stars are what I like most about this one.  Clark Gable and Constance Bennett are our leads and I do love them both.  Connie is so very sophisticated and tries her hardest to keep Gable at arm's length.  I almost always like Constance.  She's got a great screen presence and she's usually cynical.  You know what you are getting with the "King".

 

37. Employees' Entrance (1933) - I always find it humorous that the department stores are featured so prominently in the 30s.  "Men's Clothing.  You need to increase sales or else."  I just can't take it too seriously.  And I really didn't go for this one.  Warren William is the ruling fist of his department store.  He doesn't believe in anything but sales and maybe some female conquests on the side.  Loretta Young is the new girl who finds herself caught up in the drama of high-stake department storing.  Her love interest is Wallace Ford.  It's Wallace, again!  After not knowing he was such a leading player in the 30s, I now see him everywhere!

 

38. The Devil's Party (1938) -- A solid-average film about a gang of teen thugs who grow up and take different paths.  Victor McLaglen is the primary figure, as he plays a club owner with his hands in some shady dealings.  There's also a priest (Paul Kelly, playing the Pat O'Brien role), two cops (William Gargan and John Gallaudet), and a dame (Beatrice Roberts).  Vic is the reason to watch this one.  He's not as fiery as he is in most films, but his character and dilemma are interesting.

 

 

39. Designing Woman (1957) -- I was mostly drained by this comedy. I like the set-up, kind of an "odd couple" of couples, with the sophisticated fashion designer (Lauren Bacall) and the uncultured sportswriter (Gregory Peck) falling for one another.  But the comedy just never does a thing for me.  The scenario itself should be funny, but it just didn't get to that level with me.  Vincente Minnelli can be very hit or miss with me.  This was a miss.

 

40. I Take This Woman (1940) -- A heartbroken Hedy Lamarr is rescued by doctor Spencer Tracy and a love affair begins.  Does she love him or love that he cared about her?  Does she still love her old flame?  This is mostly a romance about two different people who don't trust the other and their feelings for them.  On that level, I liked it.  How the story is told and how it unfolds didn't always keep my interest.  I actually got tired of Spence's distrust.

 

41. Mystery House (1938) -- For such a little film, it features quite a bit of killing.  Who the heck is offing everyone in sight?  And why?  Yes, this is a mystery house.  There's a bunch of folks gathered and a bunch of folks are being splattered.  Dick Purcell is the man on the case, while Ann Sheridan is a nurse who lends her friend a helping hand.  For the kind of film this is, it mostly succeeds.

 

42. The Steel Trap (1952) -- A cautionary film noir that I think Quiet Gal would really enjoy.  It's about a bank employee (Joseph Cotten) who has decided he can make away with a million bucks.  He has his plan all figured out.  The only thing is, almost everything seems to get in his way.  The film does an excellent job of creating tension.  That is its strength.  I didn't like the vibe of the picture, though.  It's much too "sunny".  Teresa Wright plays Joseph's wife.

 

43. Swing-Shift Maisie (1943) -- This war-time Maisie is no great shakes.  Maisie (Ann Sothern) works a factory job to help the war effort.  Here she falls for Breezy (James Craig), a pilot.  Everything is fine and dandy until Maisie's friend Iris (Jean Rogers) starts to steal her man from her.  The time and setting for this picture just handcuffs it.

 

44. Three-Cornered Moon (1933) -- What an odd duck this picture is.  The family Rimplegar is hit hard by the Depression and they must seek work to keep their home.  That means Claudette Colbert, Wallace Ford, and their siblings need to put up with personal disappointment to make ends meet.  Claudette's boyfriend (Hardie Albright), who is staying in the home, is also asked to find work.  But since he's an artist, he chooses not to "sell out". Thankfully for Claudette, a young doctor (Richard Arlen) has taken a fancy to her.  This is definitely not my kind of picture.  It's no My Man Godfrey.  The kooky Mary Boland at least makes it watchable.  She plays the mother.

 

45. Walk East on Beacon! (1952) -- If there is one kind of film that rarely resonates with me, it's the Red Scare films noir that served as propaganda in the 50's.  This would be one of them.  The storyline is very involved.  Lots of people are rounded up and it takes a good deal of attention to keep track of everything.  What saves this film for me are the locations.  It was shot in Boston.  It's great to see the sights of Beantown.

 

46. Please Believe Me (1950) -- Not your usual kind of comedy.  This one is about people seeking something and Deborah Kerr is the one being sought after.  Those flocking around this heiress are Robert Walker, Mark Stevens, and Peter Lawford.  All have their reasons for wanting to be with Deborah.  There's also James Whitmore, who plays Walker's accomplice.  Lots of maneuvering is what you'll find, with Deborah being pulled every which way.  This is kind of a screwball comedy for the 1950s.  The thing is, I can't say it's "ha-ha" funny.  It's mostly situational.

 

47. Father of the Bride (1950) -- After hearing that both Sweet T and Snippy didn't like this one, I thought to myself, "it must be good!" :D  They are right.  It's not.  In fact, I thought it was rather torturous.  After loving The Catered Affair, this one is exactly what I feared a wedding film to be.  Dreadful.  I almost always like Spencer Tracy.  I didn't like him in this one.  Surprisingly, I did like Joan Bennett.  She still has my heart, even as the mother.

 

48. Murder by Television (1935) -- The title says it all.  Yes, there is a murder by television that occurs.  At least by the signal.  What is being offered is a signal that can be beamed around the world, instantaneously.  Who would have thunk it?  Controlling this new technology is where the games begin.  Somebody is willing to murder for it, evidently.  Bela Lugosi plays two brothers, one good and one bad.  The idea of this film is fine.  It's the presentation that is stale and uninspired.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEmjdb2PgU0

 

49. The Sisters (1938) -- This film felt like a lesser Little Women.  It features three sisters (Bette Davis, Anita Louse, Jane Bryan) finding love and then meeting up with some difficulties as life does to one.  But the title is somewhat misleading, since we spend the vast majority of the time with one sister (Bette) and her man, Errol Flynn.  While their relationship has its moments of interest, I found them mostly drab.  Poor Errol is seemingly neutered by this picture.  Or is that just marriage? :D

 

50. Over-Exposed (1956) -- I was rather excited to watch this Cleo Moore film noir.  I was hoping to see her over-exposed!  It has its moments of that. :)  But Cleo learns to become a photographer and ends up caught in a murder mystery thanks to her camera.  It sounds much more thrilling than it is.  Most of the film is spent with "dealings".  Not much goes on.  The ending is rather silly.  Richard Crenna plays Cleo's love interest.  He's mostly understated.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYyoHijcAlM

 

51. The Strip (1951) -- A Mickey Rooney film noir that has some excellent music but not that excellent of a story.  But, oh, the music!  Louis Armstrong, Earl Hines, and Vic Damone are superb.  Rooney plays a drummer who falls for Miss Goddess, a nightclub dancer who wishes to be an actress, played by Sally Forrest.  The Mickster's girl gets caught up with the wrong folks and this places him smack dab in the middle of a crime.  Of note, the nightclub owner is a guy called "Fluff", who is played by film noir icon... William Demarest.  Say what?!

 

52. Woman in the Shadows (1934) -- This Dashiell Hammett story has some interesting moments, but what we are given as a film just doesn't carry enough weight.  A woman (Fay Wray) knocks on a paroled man's (Ralph Bellamy) door in the middle of the night.  She's in some trouble.  Soon, her trouble (Melvyn Douglas) comes a knocking, too.  This leads to a confrontation which leads to even more trouble for our parolee.  He opts to flee.  The star power of this film makes it worth checking out.  It's just the story and direction hold it back.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kx1qXDAcvJg

 

53. Easy to Love (1953) -- My first Esther Williams picture was a drowning.  Ugh!  I really wanted to like this one, but the story is so empty and the characters just don't do a thing for me.  I can't believe I didn't even like Van Johnson, who is almost always likable.  This was Carroll Baker's first film role.  She's on screen for about a minute, as a jealous girlfriend of Tony Martin's.  More Carroll!

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I think you need to see a doctor.  A musical at #1?!  At least it's the best one ever made.   :)

And you now think Yul a "great actor"?  I really think you're an impostor, now.

 

And I recognize several titles now that you described their plots, thanks for that and for the links.  

 

I forgot what Frank's character was like in Marriage on the Rocks----what a stupid idea to cast him that way!  And I generally don't like Deborah in comedy, for some reason.  The exception is The Grass is Greener, and Jean was the funny one in that.

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It looks like more than Boston froze over yesterday! (As Harry Carey, Jr says about hell in "Wagon Master" "It ain't cussing, it's geography.")

 

A musical at No. 1. Oh my!

 

In an unrelated matter ---- Hi April.

 

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Hi, SansFin -- I love this movie! It is two curmudgeons attempting to be normal people. It is comedy of errors as their worlds collide! The restaurant scene is perfect! When he is hiding is perfect! 

 

I did love the restaurant scene in Designing Woman.  I loved Peck's just sitting their with pasta on his lap.  Very funny.  And the film did have its moments with me.

 

I find this movie one of the best of its time and genre. There is little to which I can point and say: "This is better than in most other movies" but the admixture is well worth much more than its parts.

 

I can't disagree with those words about Mystery House.  It's pretty entertaining and there is a lot going on.  And I really like films like this.  I'm not sure what kept me from liking it more.

 

I found this to be much more captivating than it likely deserves. There is much wrong with it and I can not explain why I like it so much.

 

I believe The Phantom Fiend has its good points, for sure.  I thought the ending was quite good.

 

I feel that this movie is quite good. The plot is sufficiently twisty and I found locations to be quite interesting mixture to what could be stage play. Cecil Parker is true jewel of the movie! He is just so very wonderfully British!

 

Excellent comments!  I think you hit on the charm of 23 Paces to Baker Street.  It does feature good atmosphere.

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How do, Musicman -- It looks like more than Boston froze over yesterday! (As Harry Carey, Jr says about hell in "Wagon Master" "It ain't cussing, it's geography.")

 

Hilarious!  What a great line!

 

A musical at No. 1. Oh my!

 

Something is rotten in Pennsylvania.

 

In an unrelated matter ---- Hi April.

 

:)

 

Cleopatra - Big budget and a mostly naked Claudette Colbert. Good enough just on that fact.

 

More laughs from me!  Yes, I agreed with you.

 

Designing Woman - Pleasant enough if 50's sex comedies of the upper end income folks are your thing. I enjoyed it. Peck and Bacall seem an unlikely pair but I thought it went well.

 

I guess 50s sex comedies of the upper end income folks ain't my thing!

 

Father of The Bride - I like it better than others seem to like it. It's Tracy's movie. My daughter, thankfully, wants a small wedding. I hope I won't have to act out the film. Young ladies can be whiny and weddings add a stress to everyone's life that ought to be avoided. (The stress that is.) 

 

Now I'm just laughing at the thought of you as Spence in Father of the Bride!  Too much fun!

 

The Gilded Lily - Colbert and MacMurray. Can't go wrong there. I think this was the film where I found out Fred was a very funny guy. (Not the mildly funny guy of "My Three Sons.")

 

It's only been in the past few years that I learned that Fred was a leading comedic man of the 30s!  And I do like him.  He's very "comfy".

 

23 Paces To Baker Street - When I saw it I thought it an unusual concept. (I think it was the basis for a short lived TV series in 1970.) Johnson did a fine job and the London setting helped.

 

I'm with ya.  Both you and SansFin have been wise to point out the London setting.

 

The Virginian - I saw it but I don't remember much about it other than Cooper. Those early sound westerns were often handicapped by sound as they limited camera movement somewhat. Would like to see it and then followed by McCrea's version. (There was a version from 2000 with Bill Pullman that has been shown on Encore Westerns but as I recall outside of a few basic plot points didn't resemble the earlier versions that much. I didn't care for it too much.)

 

I think you'd appreciate it a little more if you watched it again.  I was impressed to find future great westerns in this Victor Fleming western.  Victor Fleming?

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Good evening, Quiet Gal -- Abbott and Costello Meet the Invisible Man (1951)  I have probably seen it. They all start to run together for me eventually. ha. It's been a long time since those Sunday afternoon movies way back when I was a youngun.. which is pretty much when I watched any of the A&C movies that have ever seen. I just remember they used to show them quite often when I was a kid, and it always seemed like it was a Sunday afternoon. But hey.. it might have been a Saturday. I am old and it's been  a lonnnnnnnnnng time since then.

 

That's when I first saw A&C, as well.  They aired in the late-morning hours of Sunday during my time. 

 

The Farmer's Daughter (1947)  I l-o-v-e LOVE this movie. But I am not sure what to think about how YOU will like it. I can see  you writing it off.. but I can also see you liking it because the "little man" (even if she is a woman) gets his (ha.. her) chance to shine in this one. But I ALSO like Ethel Barrymore's character too. Very good role for her.  And enjoy her relationship with the butler. (Charles Bickford) I also love the fight w/ the brothers near the end.. ha. Boy, oh boy, they were going to make him pay for hurting their sister. ha. Too funny. I guess you could say I just like pretty much everything about it. 

 

Very good!  You remember this one very well!  I certainly didn't write this one off.  I was actually worried this was going to be a sweeping drama.  When I saw it was more of a Capra-esque comedy, I really perked up.  I liked it.  Loretta is very good.

 

Father of the Bride (1950)  It's an ok way to pass the time watching this movie.. but can't say it's a stand out. I don't know. You might have enjoyed some of Spencer Tracy's constant agony.. ha. But I can't see you enjoying this movie too much. I DO have to confess though.. I REALLY like the remake of this story (with Steve Martin) it is a MUCH funnier (and in my mind... even sweeter) telling of the tale. But I confess... that could just be my opinion. :)

 

Look at you!  You guessed it right with me.  I really felt the time with this one.  And that's never a good thing with a comedy.

 

Gigi (1958)  Agh.. have only seen portions of this film.. just NOT my cup o' tea. Can't seeing it as yours either.. but to be honest. I have NO idea how you'd rate it because I have never been able to make myself watch it long enough to tell ha. 

 

Whoops!  I can see how this would not be your kind of film.

 

I'll Be Seeing You (1944)  I THINK I  have seen this.. or I have at least seen part of it.. maybe. I looked it up and I totally recognized the story.. but I am embarrassed to admit.. ha.. it might only be because I READ about it, rather than watched it. I need to probably watch it (or re-watch it) to be sure one way or  the other, but I DO think it sounds like a very good story. Agh. I hate getting old to the point I don't even know if I have watched a movie or NOT! ha. (pretty soon.. I'll be just some old gal.. wandering about aimlessly, needing someone to remind me to put my shoes on AFTER I put on my socks.. not before. HA. :D (poor kidling.. she'll have her hands full with just keeping up with me, someday) :D

 

She's gonna toss you in a home!  But at least you could get caught up on all these classics!

 

In the Good Old Summertime (1949)  I enjoy this movie well enough, but it can't hold a candle (for me) to The Shop Around the Corner. It's a nice enough way to spend a little down time, just to watch for "fluff" ha.. but I love the other story so much better. I do not see it being to big of a hit for you. 

 

Uh-oh.  You pretty much nailed that one.  And I agree with you, The Shop Around the Corner is the one I really like.  I wonder if Miss G remembers what I first said after watching it for the first time after her telling me to watch it.  Believe it or not, I've come a long way.

 

Mourning Becomes Electra (1947)  I am on the edge of my seat waiting to hear how much you hated this movie. HA! I still say it is like watching a train wreck.. ha. Very gut-wrenching the way they all just hate each other to pieces. But you might have found some of it to y our liking. I am also waiting for you to come back here and tell me how silly I am for confusing it with the other movie that we talked about.. ha. (since I have never seen it.. I still have NO answer for that one. (did I mention that I am fast on my way to just being an old fogey woman who will need help with her shoes and socks one day soon?? Ha) :D

 

I want to know how you came to watch this one!  I'm stunned you watched it!

 

The Virginian (1929)

 

Have not seen this one, but looked it up because I wasn't sure. Looks like it would be a fun one to catch, so I may have to try and watch it, if I can. 

 

When you consider when it was made, it's well done.  You would probably enjoy it on that level.

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Bonjour, Texas Two-Step -- GASP!!!! This is my favorite list of yours yet! I think I have seen every film but like 7 or 8. That never happens!

 

Are you kidding?  You have usually seen everything that I have watched!

 

Abbott and Costello Meet the Invisible Man (1951) This is a pretty funny one, but it isn;t my favorite. I put it somewhere in the middle for the A & C list I have seen. I do like that William Frawley plays a cop in it.

 

I'm impressed by your knowledge of A&C.  You have seen almost all of their films!

 

Age of Consent (1969) Okay I'm just going to start off by saying that the I love this movie, HOWEVER, there are many MANY parts I have to look away for or fast-forward through because there is a LOT of nudity. But Helen Mirren is one of my very very favorite actresses so I at least had to see if she was any good in it, which was why I watched it in the first place. Now having said all that, I actually really like the story. It's super cute. James Mason is nowhere near one of my favorite actors, but I liked him in it. The relationship between Helen and him is, at first, very uncomfortable, because of their vast age difference, but as the films plays, the story gets cuter with how they react around each other. I like the fluff nature of it...without the nudity. :D:D Needless to say, you loved this one, right?

 

I didn't love it, but I did like it a good deal.  And while you were fast-forwarding, I was rewinding! :P  Your Helen has quite a body!  James Mason was in this film?  I didn't know. :D  I like James.  His voice is one of my favorites in classic film.  Helen mentions how James met his second wife on this film.  They were 22 years apart in age, ironically.  And even his wife was nude in this one!

 

ageofconsent3_zpsbd1bd61c.jpg

 

Blossoms in the Dust (1941) YAY!!! GREER! And don't you dare say she killed anyone! Kathy needed my long black gloves and they're ready to wear!

 

What do you think the "blossoms" in the dust are?!  Bodies!  She's a serial killer in this one!

 

Did you at least like ol' pipe and slippers here?

 

He doesn't last long!  He gets buried!

 

The Brothers Karamazov (1958)  I really love Yul Brynner here. Something tells me you'd like his "Dmitri". I love the psychology in this film. The intensity blows my mind. I'd truly love to hear to review of this one.

 

You were right, I did like Yul's "Dmitri".  His choice in women is interesting.

 

Cleopatra (1934) I Love any film with Egyptian settings and love to compare all the Cleaopatras. This one I love purely for the fact that Claudette Colbert is playing it so differently than she usually does. She is shaking things up here as the alluring and undeniably irresistable Queen of Egypt. It is quite convincing and entertaining for me the whole way through.

 

I agree!  I found Claudette to be inviting and very playful in a sexy way.  It was a different kind of Claudette for me.

 

Designing Woman (1957) This one will be at the bottom of your list, I have already figured that out. What is it with you and being bored with the cutesie ones!?

 

I'm a guy!  Not enough meat on the bone!  You're serving me salad!  Blech!

 

The Farmer's Daughter (1947) I have a feeling you were not into this one either. It seems too political for you and too romantic with no villain evil enough for you to keep interested. Let me know if I am wrong. :D

 

You're wrong!  I like political!  It's a very idealistic film.  This is my kind of sweet.

 

Father of the Bride (1950) This one is supposed to be one that all classic film lovers are to appreciate highly. But I find it very blah. I usually take father/daughter relationship films and run with them, loving the whol aspect of them, but this doesn't really focus on them as father and daughter. It focuses too heavily on Spencer Tracy and how he deals with the changes in his life and family. Also, I think Elizabeth Taylor is whiny in it and doesn't act mature enough to be getting married.

 

I'm with you on this one.  As much as I like Spencer Tracy, I didn't like him here.  I was drained by him and this film.

 

Gigi (1958) I know, you like Maurice! Yay! It's a very different plot for a fluffy cute musical. The whole concept of a young innocent girl being trained to become a man's mistress doesn't scream musical in my book, but it actually works. Plus it's Leslie Caron. She can never do wrong for me. Heehee!

 

Once again, you are correct.  I loved Maurice!  It says a lot when I like a guy more than the girl.  Leslie was cute when she was being rambunctious.

 

In the Good Old Summertime (1949) This is Judy Garland. It is a musical and it's romantic fun.....you hated it? Heehee!! This film is one of my earliest memories and I adore it. I like the spunk of this remake to Shop Around the Corner. Everyone will probably hate me for saying that, but it's Judy and it's too cute not to love! Plus you get to see little Liza Minnelli at the very end! AAWWWWWW! Heehee!

 

I definitely didn't hate it.  It's a remake of The Shop Around the Corner, and I really like that story and film.  So having that as its basis, it's already okay with me.  I just had some issues with how it was told.  The party at the end was bothersome.

 

Marriage on the Rocks (1965)  Please tell me this one made you laugh! It overloads me with happiness and funny situations. And Deborah Kerr is so goreous in it too!

 

It didn't make me laugh much, but Deborah Kerr is certainly gorgeous in it!

 

marriageontherocks2_zpsdb7dc7ca.jpg

 

marriageontherocks1_zps6533db34.jpg

 

Nightmare (1956)  OH, that's the movie you were referring to with Kevin McCarthy! Ironically, I watched this one just the other day. I haven't even logged it yet. It was REALLY good....for a film noir. :P:P Oh how I loved seeing Edward G Robinson as the good natured brother-in-law. Such a great change up for him and as a family man too! Sooooooo weird, but great! Now you truly need to see Invasion of the Body Snatchers! You will love it. I'm being honest!! It's not even fluffy and cute! I'm not lying!

 

Eddie played a lot of good guys from the 1940's on.  A mellow, reformed gangster, he was. :D  I do like him as a detective.  And I do need to see Invasion of the Body Snatchers.  Although, Kevin McCarthy is an actor who bothers me some.  He's best as a bad guy because he conveys smugness.

 

The Virginian (1929) Gary!!!! He's such a cutie in this one! I love the cast in this one! Mary Brian plays an interesting female lead opposite Gary. It's a different change of pace, but I liked it!

 

It's Mary Cooper!  Look at all that make-up!

 

Woman in the Shadows (1934)  This is a Fay Wray film I have yet to see, but I had it on my list to watch soon, actually. I do love her! Do you think I would like it?

 

Yes, I think you'd like this one well enough.  Fay's entrance is terrific.

 

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Two Girls and a Sailor (1944)  This is my FAVORITE of Junie Allyson's films with my Vanji (Van Johnson)! YAY!!! This is way too much fluff for you, though, and you probably thought it was too predictable. Gloria DeHaven makes a great pairing with Junie as her sister in a singing act who entertain for troops of all military branches. They are so adorable for words! I love all the swing dancing and songs, of course. The "Young Man with a Horn" sequence with Harry James and Junie is a great swing moment. That's one of the styles I am learning with my dance partner right now that I was telling you about. Great supporting performance with Jimmy Durante too that makes you heart melt! And I simply love all the camoeos with Lena Horne, the Wilde Twins, and my mom's personally favorite moment is with Gracie Allen's Concerto with Index Finger. It makes us giggle out loud every single time!

 

I forgot all about Harry James!  He's fantastic in this one.  I really liked him and his music.  Just great stuff.  And I completely forgot about Virginia O'Brien!  She's fantastic!  I like her a lot.  They both added a lot to this picture.  Shockingly, this was a fluff film of yours that I enjoyed.  I liked Gloria a great deal.  She was cute.  And there's also Ava Gardner!

 

Easy to Love (1953)  Another Vanji movie. Gee, you're just on a roll! This is a great example of Essie (Esther Williams') work. There are flawless aquatic performances and she always gives the right amount of flare and charm. "You really can't go wrong with Essie" as my grandmama always says. She is quite right, you know. Heehee! This was also probably torture for you. Why do you do that to yourself, silly? Unless you liked her numbers with her cute little outfits. Actually, Joe really liked her in Bathing Beauty. I just looked at him and said, "You only liked seeing her in a swimsuit, didn't  you?!" Of course he is always so honest and just nodded with the silliest smile. Men!!

 

You can tell your grandma, you can really go wrong with Essie!  I sure hope this is not a great example of her work.  I'm in serious trouble if it is!  Please tell me the stories are better in her other films!

 

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Aloha, Miss Gun for Hire -- I think you need to see a doctor.  A musical at #1?!  At least it's the best one ever made.   :)

 

That would be Top Secret!! :P  I definitely enjoyed GigiThe Smiling Lieutenant is my favorite musical, right now.  What's shocking is that I agree with you about the songs.  The songs are sensational.

 

And you now think Yul a "great actor"?  I really think you're an impostor, now.

 

Ha!  I never dogged on Yul!  It's just that I haven't seen much of him.  I actually watched him in the Studio One episode, "Flowers from a Stranger", too.  The Westinghouse ads are a riot.  As is the "radio organ" that is played for dramatic effect.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QhZ3h5tCmg

 

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I forgot what Frank's character was like in Marriage on the Rocks----what a stupid idea to cast him that way!  And I generally don't like Deborah in comedy, for some reason.  The exception is The Grass is Greener, and Jean was the funny one in that.

 

Frank isn't too much fun in Marriage on the Rocks.  And when he lightens up in the second half, it's rather ridiculous.

 

marriageontherocks3_zpsa8ce201e.jpg

 

After Office Hours (1935) Gable and Connie, right? I don't remember terribly much, just a typically enjoyable pre-code made better by Gable's presence.

 

Connie is a trip in this one.  She's summoning you a bit, Manhattan Bliz... wait!  What's icy in Hawaii?!

Blossoms in the Dust (1941) Not a great film but touching. Marsha Hunt's story was very surprising.

 

It was over in an instant!

The Brothers Karamazov (1958) One of the better book adaptations even though none of the brothers looked like they could possibly have had the same mother. Yul's Dimitri is delicately balanced between passion and sensitivity. Captain Kirk being saintly is questionable but how handsome he was then. I love Doestoyevsky.

 

I didn't know you liked Dostoevsky that much.  So what do you like about this one?  I'm trying to figure out what appeals to you, other than Yul.  The spiritual side?

Cleopatra (1934) I was underwhelmed. Wanted to like it more. I prefer Elizabeth's or even Vivien's kittenish queen of the Nile.

 

As much as I like Viv, I didn't go for her Cleopatra and the film.  I still have to see Liz.

 

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Danger Signal (1945) Sounds familiar. Raft?

 

Uh-huh.  I think Raft is very good in this one.

The Dark Past (1948) Another vaguely familiar title--- is this the remake of the movie about the hostages with the shrink analyzing their captor? Lee J. again?
 

Very good!  That's a great pull by you.  I prefer Blind Alley with Ralph Bellamy.

 

Designing Woman (1957) I like it ok. Peck isn't very funny to me, though.

 

Ohhhhh, the stage production pals of Lauren and the finale with the dancer (Jack Cole?) saving the day... painful.

Employees' Entrance (1933) Good precode, one of those delightfully wolfish performances by Warren William.

 

Do you like these kind of films?

 

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The Farmer's Daughter (1947) When I'm not distracted by Loretta's Princess Leia hairdo I enjoy it, mostly for Bickford and Ethel. When it gets political it goes south for me. And Loretta is just too sexless here. Don't think it Oscar worthy.

 

Princess Leia! :D  You're not one for politics, I do know that.  It's the political idealism that makes me like the film, actually.

Father of the Bride (1950) I'm one of the few that don't care much for it, despite adoring all three leads. It's a bit too smug, especially Joan's vapid mother.

 

Joanie!  Not poor Joanie!

 

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Gigi (1958) Simply my favorite musical. Perfectly cast. Chevalier is glorious. It often stirs up the Puritan in many Ameticans. It amazingly preserves Collette 's insouciance. How did Hollywood do that?! By using no Americans I guess, lol. I also adore the songs. I wonder how Audrey was in the original play.

 

I didn't know Audrey did the play.  The role surely feels very "Audrey".  I would have loved her as "Gigi".  And here I thought you were the most puritanical of all!  No?  It must be my presence! :D

High Pressure (1932) Powell was so marvelously energetic in these years, playing lovely rascals.

 

Agreed!  He's brilliant.  I'd say he's my favorite actor of the 30's.

 

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I'll Be Seeing You (1944)  I really like this film. In fact, I think I opened my Rambles thread with a post about it. Anyway I remember writing a bit on it, I still consider it underrated, seldom mentioned among wartime movies. Yet it has to be among the earliest to deal sensitively with "shell shock". I like that both Cotten and Ginger are trapped by Shame into lying to each other.

 

Excellent!  I like your words.  And I didn't know you started "Rambles" with this film.  I remember a Lang film being one.  And you're still awaiting my reply! :D  I like how you say Shame keeps them lying to each other.  That's perfect.  The trust level just isn't there because they are afraid to lose the other.

In the Good Old Summertime (1949) Don't like it. The opposite type of musical subject to Gigi. Blahhhhh.... I rarely respond to Americana in musical form for some reason. I like it in drama.
 

So what do you respond to with musicals?

 

I Take This Woman (1940) I'm impressed by both the story (except the last big with the kids ) and the performances. Hedy is sweet and lost and Spence is just so good at being good---without being a bore or seeming like a wimp.

 

I struggled with this one.  Spence was bothering me again.  Although, I can see why he wouldn't trust her.  Once again, he's so afraid of losing her that he jumps to the worst conclusion.  I can relate to that.  It hurts to lose out, so you come to expect it.  Also, Hedy didn't realize she really loved him until after a little while.  She finally got it.

Johnny Angel (1946) Is this Raft again ? If it's the one I think I enjoyed it but can't remember the plot!

 

Yes, this is Raft.  I liked him a great deal in this one.  Loved the mood.

Man-Proof (1938)  Myrna trying to be " modern" again? :D She's so fun to watch in the thirties. Can do no wrong.

 

I'm convinced Myrna plays you in most every film.

Marriage on the Rocks (1965) Love Frank and Deborah but they deserved better than this. (Especially after their From Here to Eternity roles).
 

I agree.  The best thing I can say is that it did look like they were all having fun together.  I bet they were.  Deborah seems like a lass who would be fun to be around.  She seems easy to get along with.  Love her.

Mourning Becomes Electra (1947) Maybe so, but she bored me. Though I loved your description of this and Ambersons, Ro! Lol. They are two screwed up families, ha. But I love Ambersons. For the sense of loss.

 

You like the Ambersons because they are just as mule-headed as you!

 

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Murder by Television (1935) Hilarious title! I feel this way when forced to watch The View or reality shows.

 

Ha!  I can see why!  You can also place me in the "do not like" category with reality shows.

The Sisters (1938) Errol and Bette? Underwhelming. Errol was good though.

 

But Errol wasn't Errol!  Underwhelming is right.

Something Wild (1961) Apt title. It fascinates and repels. Ultimately she's victimized as much by her mother and her "savior" as by her assailant.
 

That's brilliant!  Beautifully said.  Lots of people taking advantage of poor Carroll.  But she comes to love one of them and she does love the other.

 

The Steel Trap (1952) Joe Cotten heist film? Not bad. Some decent suspense.

 

"Suspense" is a good word it.  It's pretty darn suspenseful.

23 Paces to Baker Street (1956) I really like everything about it. Nice seeing Van out of his element, as in The End of the Affair which I liked less .

 

Wow!  I would not have guessed you liking this one.  I think it's good, too.  But I like The End of the Affair more.

The Twonky (1953)  Adorable!!!! I want one. :)

 

To keep your man in line? :D  I got a kick out of The Twonky.  You're not going to find many films like it.  Especially during its time.  It is very strange, and the plot points make no sense at all.

The Virginian (1929) Not as good as I remember but it's all there, Cowboy Coop. I saw the Bill Pullman version with Diane Lane that Chris mentioned. I'm sure I saw Joel's, too, but neither thrilled me.
 

I'll have to watch Joel's version.

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That would be Top Secret!! :P  I definitely enjoyed Gigi.  The Smiling Lieutenant is my favorite musical, right now.  What's shocking is that I agree with you about the songs.  The songs are sensational.

 

I even had a CD of the score as a kid.  Loved it.

 

 

Ha!  I never dogged on Yul!  It's just that I haven't seen much of him.  I actually watched him in the Studio One episode, "Flowers from a Stranger", too.  The Westinghouse ads are a riot.  As is the "radio organ" that is played for dramatic effect.

 

I love those things, too.  Carol Burnett would often use the organ for her send-ups and "soap opera" skits.  Too funny.

I don't believe I've seen that episode with Yul, so thank you very much for the link.  He was a pioneer behind the camera in early TV, which few people know.  He was evidently what they used to call a real "Renaissance man", who could do it all.

 

 

Frank isn't too much fun in Marriage on the Rocks.  And when he lightens up in the second half, it's rather ridiculous.

 

If Frank does comedy he needs to be "loose" or he's about as funny as a hockey puck.  I feel embarrassed for all the performers, well---like you said they probably all had fun anyway.  At least they got a good still of Frank out of it, one of my favorite shots of him actually.  Let's see, how many divorces had he gotten by then? :) :

 

frank-sinatra-marriage-on-the-rocks-warn

 

After Office Hours (1935) Gable and Connie, right? I don't remember terribly much, just a typically enjoyable pre-code made better by Gable's presence.

 

Connie is a trip in this one.  She's summoning you a bit, Manhattan Bliz... wait!  What's icy in Hawaii?!

 

I can't remember much about her character or the plot.

Blossoms in the Dust (1941) Not a great film but touching. Marsha Hunt's story was very surprising.

 

It was over in an instant!

 

I know, but it made such an impression.  I wish her story had been more.

I didn't know you liked Dostoevsky that much.  So what do you like about this one?  I'm trying to figure out what appeals to you, other than Yul.  The spiritual side?

 

Yes.  I think Dostoevsky portrays the conflict between good and bad desires as well as any writer has.  Each person seems to be a mirror for the other in the story, only they can't see themselves.  Yul and Grushinka eventually come to a level of self honesty.  And yes, he's one of the few authors not to shy away from human spirituality.  You should check out Kurasawa's version of The Idiot when you get around to him.

 

 

As much as I like Viv, I didn't go for her Cleopatra and the film.  I still have to see Liz.

 

I thought you'd seen the 800 pound gorilla already.  What a treat you have in store!  Actually, I think you will like certain scenes a lot, especially those with Rex.  He's splendid.  He makes Burton seem so oafish in comparison, and Burton usually is the one making others seem that way.

 

Cleo:  "I asked it of Caesar.  I command it of you!"  lol

 

And I think Viv was a darling in her version, though scarcely a credible Cleopatra I suppose.  I would love to have seen her do a more modern movie with Claude.

 

I know what she would have been splendid in: The Passionate Friends.  Jettison Ann Todd for Viv.

 

Very good!  That's a great pull by you.  I prefer Blind Alley with Ralph Bellamy.

 

I like both.  I prefer Cobb, actually.  When he settles down he's a compelling actor.

 

 

 

Designing Woman (1957) I like it ok. Peck isn't very funny to me, though.

 

Ohhhhh, the stage production pals of Lauren and the finale with the dancer (Jack Cole?) saving the day... painful.

 

Ha ha!  That is funny, and I agree, that scene was cringing even for me.  And Jack would insist on being called a choreographer, not a dancer.  Hmph!  

 

Lauren's reactions to slapsie Maxie were pretty funny.  "He has no nose!"

 

Do you like these kind of films?

 

You mean pre-codes in general or just those with department store settings?  Yes, I do.  I really enjoy pre-code Loretta.  But I do have to be in the mood for them.

 

 

Princess Leia! :D  You're not one for politics, I do know that.  It's the political idealism that makes me like the film, actually.

 

I only like political movies, usually, if they involve fantastic conspiracies, a la The Manchurian Candidate and Seven Days in May.

 

Joanie!  Not poor Joanie!

 

Poor indeed!  

 

 

I didn't know Audrey did the play.  The role surely feels very "Audrey".  I would have loved her as "Gigi".  And here I thought you were the most puritanical of all!  No?  It must be my presence! :D

 

I'm not bothered by Chevalier's somewhat lecherous attitude toward teenage girls.  It really isn't a big deal to me, knowing as I do how forward teen girls are in reality.  Give me a break.  What a bore!  ;) 
 

Agreed!  He's brilliant.  I'd say he's my favorite actor of the 30's.

 

For once you exhibit good taste!  It was definitely his best decade.  

 

 

So what do you respond to with musicals?

 

In the 50s on, I seem to prefer those with a Paris or European setting.  This seemed to automatically inject the material with a more sensual and adult perspective. They are freer, buoyant.  In the 30s, I simply like the Astaire-Rogers vehicles, which are also very "continental" in tone, for the most part.  Sophistication and elegance, I suppose, are what I prefer to hyper-active optimism and "cuteness".

 

 

I struggled with this one.  Spence was bothering me again.  Although, I can see why he wouldn't trust her.  Once again, he's so afraid of losing her that he jumps to the worst conclusion.  I can relate to that.  It hurts to lose out, so you come to expect it.  Also, Hedy didn't realize she really loved him until after a little while.  She finally got it.

 

It's very much a woman's picture, so I don't blame you for not going for it.  And Spencer is rather passive.  But I have a thing for doctor characters, I think, lol.  Boone in Medic.  

Johnny Angel (1946) Is this Raft again ? If it's the one I think I enjoyed it but can't remember the plot!

 

Yes, this is Raft.  I liked him a great deal in this one.  Loved the mood.

 

This is the one I think that opened my eyes to him, along with Bolero.

Man-Proof (1938)  Myrna trying to be " modern" again? :D She's so fun to watch in the thirties. Can do no wrong.

 

I'm convinced Myrna plays you in most every film.

 

If only I could play her!  Where are Gable, Powell and Spence?!

Marriage on the Rocks (1965) Love Frank and Deborah but they deserved better than this. (Especially after their From Here to Eternity roles).
 

I agree.  The best thing I can say is that it did look like they were all having fun together.  I bet they were.  Deborah seems like a lass who would be fun to be around.  She seems easy to get along with.  Love her.

 

Mitchum said as much about her and he would be the first to spot a phony.  She seemed, like Myrna, to know how to handle high spirited men with ease and without seeming dull or undignified.

 

 

You like the Ambersons because they are just as mule-headed as you!

 

They were right to fear the future!

 

But Errol wasn't Errol!  Underwhelming is right.

 

I like Errol even when he is subdued.  He was marvelous in That Forsythe Woman.

Something Wild (1961) Apt title. It fascinates and repels. Ultimately she's victimized as much by her mother and her "savior" as by her assailant.
 

That's brilliant!  Beautifully said.  Lots of people taking advantage of poor Carroll.  But she comes to love one of them and she does love the other.

 

I guess beggars can't be choosers.  :P

 

The Steel Trap (1952) Joe Cotten heist film? Not bad. Some decent suspense.

 

"Suspense" is a good word it.  It's pretty darn suspenseful.

 

You're right about the "sunniness" of it.  I remember thinking the same thing.

 

Wow!  I would not have guessed you liking this one.  I think it's good, too.  But I like The End of the Affair more.

 

TEotA was just beyond depressing.  I don't care for her character, either.

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Good morning, Hawaiian Hurricane -- I even had a CD of the score as a kid.  Loved it.

 

Was this the silent version of Gigi? :P  I must be older than you because I didn't have any CDs when I was a kid.  I had some 45s, albums, and cassettes.

 

I love those things, too.  Carol Burnett would often use the organ for her send-ups and "soap opera" skits.  Too funny.

 

It's hilarious!  Even when I was a young boy who had no idea what the send-ups were, I loved The Carol Burnett Show.

 

I don't believe I've seen that episode with Yul, so thank you very much for the link.  He was a pioneer behind the camera in early TV, which few people know.  He was evidently what they used to call a real "Renaissance man", who could do it all.

 

I had no idea he was involved in the production side of television.  I know that he was on Broadway before he really hit the big screen.

 

If Frank does comedy he needs to be "loose" or he's about as funny as a hockey puck.

 

Ha!  Yeah, Frank can be very off with some comedies.

 

I feel embarrassed for all the performers, well---like you said they probably all had fun anyway.  At least they got a good still of Frank out of it, one of my favorite shots of him actually.  Let's see, how many divorces had he gotten by then?

 

:D  I have no idea how many times he was married.  I'm not sure why actors even got married after a while.  What was the point?

 

I can't remember much about her character or the plot.

 

Constance is a society writer for a newspaper in After Office Hours.  Gable has a thing for her but she's not too keen on him.  She doesn't like how he thinks he's going to get his way with everything.  So there's a power struggle involved between the two.

 

Yes.  I think Dostoevsky portrays the conflict between good and bad desires as well as any writer has.  Each person seems to be a mirror for the other in the story, only they can't see themselves.

 

Very good!  I really like that.  There's definitely a grand mix of good and bad in The Brothers Karamazov.

 

Yul and Grushinka eventually come to a level of self honesty.

 

That they do.  I think Dmitri (Yul Brynner) always had a fair view of himself.  He just liked to have some fun and despised the power some had over him, such as his father.

 

And yes, he's one of the few authors not to shy away from human spirituality.  You should check out Kurasawa's version of The Idiot when you get around to him.

 

I'll soon cross the Kurosawa bridge.  I've been reticent because of my lack of fondness for Asian culture.

 

I thought you'd seen the 800 pound gorilla already.  What a treat you have in store!  Actually, I think you will like certain scenes a lot, especially those with Rex.  He's splendid.  He makes Burton seem so oafish in comparison, and Burton usually is the one making others seem that way.

 

I just saw how long the film is!  Now I understand why you called it the "800-pound gorilla"!  Gone with the Wind now looks like a regular film!

 

Cleo:  "I asked it of Caesar.  I command it of you!"  lol

 

So that's whose language you've been using with me!

 

And I think Viv was a darling in her version, though scarcely a credible Cleopatra I suppose.  I would love to have seen her do a more modern movie with Claude.

 

It's impossible to know how Cleopatra really was.  Some say she was childish, so Viv's portrayal could be one of the better ones.

 

I know what she would have been splendid in: The Passionate Friends.  Jettison Ann Todd for Viv.

 

I don't want to jettison Ann!  I love her icy blonde!  Although, she's often vacant. :)

 

I like both.  I prefer Cobb, actually.  When he settles down he's a compelling actor.

 

I also like Lee.  It's just he can be overbearing.  He's not so bad in The Dark Past.

 

Ha ha!  That is funny, and I agree, that scene was cringing even for me.  And Jack would insist on being called a choreographer, not a dancer.  Hmph!  

 

Yeah, well, I'm definitely Gregory Peck in Designing Woman with that one.

 

Lauren's reactions to slapsie Maxie were pretty funny.  "He has no nose!"

 

Ha!  That's funny!  I did like Maxie.

 

You mean pre-codes in general or just those with department store settings?  Yes, I do.  I really enjoy pre-code Loretta.  But I do have to be in the mood for them.

 

I meant pre-codes.  They don't seem to be a type of film you usually gravitate towards.  I definitely like Loretta in pre-codes.  It's where she's the best.

 

I only like political movies, usually, if they involve fantastic conspiracies, a la The Manchurian Candidate and Seven Days in May.

 

Those are the best kind, the political thrillers.

I'm not bothered by Chevalier's somewhat lecherous attitude toward teenage girls.  It really isn't a big deal to me, knowing as I do how forward teen girls are in reality.  Give me a break.  What a bore!  ;) 

 

Not to mention how I know some of us guys can be!
 

For once you exhibit good taste!  It was definitely his best decade.  

 

Phfffft!  I always exhibit good taste! :P  Powell is sublime.

 

In the 50s on, I seem to prefer those with a Paris or European setting.  This seemed to automatically inject the material with a more sensual and adult perspective. They are freer, buoyant.  In the 30s, I simply like the Astaire-Rogers vehicles, which are also very "continental" in tone, for the most part.  Sophistication and elegance, I suppose, are what I prefer to hyper-active optimism and "cuteness".

 

Shockingly, if there is one area where we're in agreement, it may be this.  I am also drawn to a romantic, European setting with musicals above all else.  Of course, I prefer the ones with male sexuality in them, such as Lubitsch's musicals.  But they are also decidedly "continental".  Do you prefer dance over song, ballerina?

 

It's very much a woman's picture, so I don't blame you for not going for it.  And Spencer is rather passive.  But I have a thing for doctor characters, I think, lol.  Boone in Medic.

 

Hedy surely wasn't given the best of scripts in her career.  What is her most recognized and beloved film?

This is the one I think that opened my eyes to him, along with Bolero.

 

I shall watch Bolero.  I can't wait to see Bo Derek! :P

 

If only I could play her!  Where are Gable, Powell and Spence?!

 

You'd slap them all!

Mitchum said as much about her and he would be the first to spot a phony.  She seemed, like Myrna, to know how to handle high spirited men with ease and without seeming dull or undignified.

 

That's a lovely way to describe Deborah.  She seemed at ease, herself.  Even though she does a fine job of playing characters who are fidgety or straight-laced.

 

They were right to fear the future!

 

Only because the Ambersons were on the gravy train in the past!  Foresight!

 

I like Errol even when he is subdued.  He was marvelous in That Forsythe Woman.

 

I definitely liked him in that one.  He was much more interesting than in The Sisters.  How he enters the picture is very "Errol", though.

 

I guess beggars can't be choosers.  :P

 

You'd think!  But some of us aren't that smart.

 

You're right about the "sunniness" of it.  I remember thinking the same thing.

 

The Steel Trap has a 50s "don't do this or else" vibe to it.  I usually don't go for those kind of films.
 

TEotA was just beyond depressing.  I don't care for her character, either.

 

It's a great character for Deborah Kerr to play, though.  Much different than she's used to.

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What's up, Grey Dude??

 

She's gonna toss you in a home! 

 

If ONLY! ha. I think I am ready to go just about any time now. What's taking her so long?? ha. :D

 

But at least you could get caught up on all these classics!

 

I'll get to those right after I finish my tapioca. :D

 

I can see how this would not be your kind of film.

 

Ha.. a BLIND man could see that. ha. (was it that obvious??) :D 
 

But wowsa, I am still shocked to see how high up on the scale YOU rated it. If you took away the MUSIC part of it, maybe.. but boy.. all those Disney musical movies musta messed with your cabeza.. all of a sudden you are NOT the Grey Dude I am remembering. Where's your buddy Harry.. or what about FRANK (from Once Upon a Time in the Blah, Blah, Blah) You've thrown them over for Leslie Caron and "The night they invented champagne!"  What IS the world coming to?? :D

 

Believe it or not, I've come a long way

Evidently!!! ha. (now if we could only get you to listen to reason about a few OTHER films.. McLintock.. Donovan's Reef.. Hell's HINGES!! (silly man) :)

 

I want to know how you came to watch this one!  I'm stunned you watched it!

 

I want to know how I came to watch it too! ha. It must have been one of those momentary lapse of reason kinda things. ha.  

 

Actually.. if memory serves, I believe I just sort of came across it one night while I was "surfing" and for whatever reason I was too stupid to turn.. um.. er.. I mean I just wanted to see what was going to happen next! ha.  I have to confess it was just so twisty and turny.. sometimes when you see that "Train Wreck" you WANT to look away, but you still keep staring at it anyway.   ha. :D 

 

PS, I am editing my post because I wanted to tell you too, how much I enjoyed reading all your comments on each film. I always look forward to that. I wish I had more time to answer some of those more in detail.. but wanted to say for now that it was a very fun read. (and I am with some of the others who have commented.. along w/ your #1, I was surprised at a few of  your other likes/dislikes this time too.. you like to keep us guessing, don't  you??) ha. 

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:D  I have no idea how many times he was married.  I'm not sure why actors even got married after a while.  What was the point?

 

If at first you don't succeed....

 

 

 

That they do.  I think Dmitri (Yul Brynner) always had a fair view of himself.  He just liked to have some fun and despised the power some had over him, such as his father.

 

The moment with the old priest was a very significant one for Dimitri.  Neither he nor anyone else looked upon him as a worthwhile soul.  Yet of them all the priest singled him out for blessing.

 

 

I'll soon cross the Kurosawa bridge.  I've been reticent because of my lack of fondness for Asian culture.

 

I suggest you start with his films in "contemporary" settings.  They look more familiarly urban.  The Idiot is set in a fairly urban world, in wintertime mostly, with snow over everything.  Kurosawa was a real storyteller, about human beings and their inner lives, not just "action". John Ford had a lot of respect for him.

 

 

I just saw how long the film is!  Now I understand why you called it the "800-pound gorilla"!  Gone with the Wind now looks like a regular film!

 

And that's the edited version!  It was originally planned for two features---one about Caesar and Cleopatra, the second about Anthony and Cleopatra.  

 

Cleo:  "I asked it of Caesar.  I command it of you!"  lol

 

So that's whose language you've been using with me!

 

I don't want to jettison Ann!  I love her icy blonde!  Although, she's often vacant. :)

 

I'll say.  Vivien would have breathed spirit, fragility and sensuality into the character.

 

 

I meant pre-codes.  They don't seem to be a type of film you usually gravitate towards.  I definitely like Loretta in pre-codes.  It's where she's the best.

 

I've always liked pre-codes, though I did like them more when i was younger.  In terms of my favorite stars, I find the 30s fun because they all are raw and full of zest.  They haven't formed their images to perfection, and just the sheer number of movies they did before becoming major stars gives you a lot to discover.  It's a "star" decade, not necessarily a story decade. Escapism is the name of the game.  That is why a movie like Counsellor at Law is such a jolt.  It's harsh and uncompromising for the 30s.  Only the zingers from the receptionist and office boys are typically 30s.  The kind of characters the 30s made us all admire (rich WASPs) are the real villains of the story.

 

 

For once you exhibit good taste!  It was definitely his best decade.  

 

Phfffft!  I always exhibit good taste! :P  Powell is sublime.

 

Fernando, who used to post here, discovered a very early Powell I have never heard of called BEHIND THE MAKE-UP.  It co-stars Fay Wray. I wish it were on YouTube but it's not (they seem to have slim pickings lately).

 

 

Shockingly, if there is one area where we're in agreement, it may be this.  I am also drawn to a romantic, European setting with musicals above all else.  Of course, I prefer the ones with male sexuality in them, such as Lubitsch's musicals.  But they are also decidedly "continental".  Do you prefer dance over song, ballerina?

 

Lubitsch, certainly.  I prefer dance but essentially, as long as it's a "book" musical I'm okay with either.  What I can't tolerate are the all-singing musicals (like The Umbrellas of Cherbourg----which is lovely if you shut the sound off).

 

 

 

Hedy surely wasn't given the best of scripts in her career.  What is her most recognized and beloved film?

 

I suppose the most recognized would be Algiers, though it's more Boyer's film.  The line (which isn't in the film) "Take me to the Casbah" makes it immortal.

 

 

I shall watch Bolero.  I can't wait to see Bo Derek! :P

 

My only comment is that the Ravel piece is a good one.

 

Only because the Ambersons were on the gravy train in the past!  Foresight!

 

Their class also had grace and graciousness.  

 

*******************************

Since you have such a mania for lists, have you thought to make a list of movies by screenwriter?  You might find writers who worked on the kind of movies you like.  You said you liked Clifford Odets, I believe.  

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I have no idea how many times he was married.  I'm not sure why actors even got married after a while.  What was the point?

 

 

I believe it may be due to fact that birth control methods were not wholly effective. It was very damaging to career to have child out-of-wedlock. Birth of full-term child after merely six months of marriage would be stigma also. It may have been convenience to marry to avoid possibility of bad publicity.

 

It may also be that some stars feel besieged when they are single. To marry was to have shield against aggressive overly-romantic fans.

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If at first you don't succeed....

 

Fail some more? :D

 

The moment with the old priest was a very significant one for Dimitri.  Neither he nor anyone else looked upon him as a worthwhile soul.  Yet of them all the priest singled him out for blessing.

 

That's a very good point.  You have a nice grasp of The Brothers Karamazov.

 

I suggest you start with his films in "contemporary" settings.  They look more familiarly urban.  The Idiot is set in a fairly urban world, in wintertime mostly, with snow over everything.  Kurosawa was a real storyteller, about human beings and their inner lives, not just "action". John Ford had a lot of respect for him.

 

I love snowy settings, so The Idiot sounds very appealing to me.  I'll look to get it when B&N has a Criterion sale in July.

 

And that's the edited version!  It was originally planned for two features---one about Caesar and Cleopatra, the second about Anthony and Cleopatra.  

 

Now that makes greater sense.  Although, I do know how epics love to be grandiose and lengthy.

 

I'll say.  Vivien would have breathed spirit, fragility and sensuality into the character.

 

But what about the ice?!  I want the ice of Ann Todd!

 

I've always liked pre-codes, though I did like them more when i was younger.  In terms of my favorite stars, I find the 30s fun because they all are raw and full of zest.  They haven't formed their images to perfection, and just the sheer number of movies they did before becoming major stars gives you a lot to discover.  It's a "star" decade, not necessarily a story decade. Escapism is the name of the game.  That is why a movie like Counsellor at Law is such a jolt. It's harsh and uncompromising for the 30s.  Only the zingers from the receptionist and office boys are typically 30s. The kind of characters the 30s made us all admire (rich WASPs) are the real villains of the story.

 

I do agree with your assessment of the 30s.  I think the story-telling is why I struggle with the 30s more than the 40s and 50s.  Also, the kind of stories told in the 30s don't resonate with me as much as the later years.

 

Fernando, who used to post here, discovered a very early Powell I have never heard of called BEHIND THE MAKE-UP. It co-stars Fay Wray. I wish it were on YouTube but it's not (they seem to have slim pickings lately).

 

I never heard of that one.  I do like Fay.

 

Lubitsch, certainly.  I prefer dance but essentially, as long as it's a "book" musical I'm okay with either.  What I can't tolerate are the all-singing musicals (like The Umbrellas of Cherbourg----which is lovely if you shut the sound off).

 

Ha!  I know that title but I have no idea what it's about.

 

I suppose the most recognized would be Algiers, though it's more Boyer's film.  The line (which isn't in the film) "Take me to the Casbah" makes it immortal.

 

That's a good choice.  It's certainly the film I like the most of Hedy's.

 

Only because the Ambersons were on the gravy train in the past!  Foresight!

 

Their class also had grace and graciousness.  

 

I thought Eugene (Joseph Cotten) had grace and graciousness.  He was laughed at and put down a great deal by that class.  By their not accepting him surely doesn't show much graciousness.

 

Since you have such a mania for lists, have you thought to make a list of movies by screenwriter?  You might find writers who worked on the kind of movies you like.  You said you liked Clifford Odets, I believe.

 

I have been looking into doing that, but it can be difficult to weed through because many writers contributed but didn't write.  Odets is the perfect suggestion for me, though.  Way to go!  I actually had not thought of him.  And, surprisingly, I have seen most of his works.  He did an Elvis film?  I never knew!

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I believe it may be due to fact that birth control methods were not wholly effective. It was very damaging to career to have child out-of-wedlock. Birth of full-term child after merely six months of marriage would be stigma also. It may have been convenience to marry to avoid possibility of bad publicity.

 

I'm sure there were some situations that matched what you were saying. But I think many just married to marry.

 

It may also be that some stars feel besieged when they are single. To marry was to have shield against aggressive overly-romantic fans.

 

Quite possibly.  And your words did stir a reason why I think they would marry.  Publicity!  Stay in the spotlight.

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