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The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

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I agree that Kurosawa is wonderful story teller. Sometimes I feel that the same material in the hands of a lesser filmmaker would fall flat. I suppose you could say that with every good movie but the thought is often there with K because at times he seems to belabor a point or have a repetitious scene or something that that and I think, this should be boring but I'm not bored at all, I'm engrossed.

 

Another excellent storyteller is Yimou Zhang. He can take a simple idea and ram it down your throat but I find myself watching, watching, watching, and I will not quit until the end. I recently watched The Road Home, Not One Less, and Story of Qui Ju in succession and was astonished to realize that they were similar in one great respect. Each story has a female protagonist that is on a mission and they simply will not give up. It nearly tries your patience to see them jumping through all these hoops. The story lines are simple on the surface but themes here and there pop up. Zhang has also done films that are a bit more lavish and perhaps a bit more complicated as well, at times quite tragic ...

 

Both Kurosawa and Zhang veer perilously close to alienating the viewer (it seems to me) in that they do things that might not work. But they do work, masters both.

 

I love Asian movies.

 

I always choke up at the final scene in Karamazov, when Dimitri tries these faux apologies to the old Captain, who looks to his young son for approval. That kid knows what he wants. When Dimitri finally stops the BS and truly humbles himself, it is quite moving.

 

--

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Sorry to interrupt any ongoing conversation in the ole "Torture Thread" but wanted to pop in here and wish our sweet friend, Ms Jackie a very happy birthday.

 

You are missed around here, friend. Hope your day is a happy one. Sending a hug (and a little cupcake action!) your way!! :D

 

Have a great birthday, little missy. 

cupcake.jpg

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Sorry to interrupt any ongoing conversation in the ole "Torture Thread" but wanted to pop in here and wish our sweet friend, Ms Jackie a very happy birthday.

 

You are missed around here, friend. Hope your day is a happy one. Sending a hug (and a little cupcake action!) your way!! :D

 

Have a great birthday, little missy. 

cupcake.jpg

 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, JACKIE

 

I hope you come back some day, dear friend.

 

Ro, I ate the cupcake. Please don't tell Jackie. Just say it was taken away by the Cupcake Monster. I don't think it is generally known that we pirates are fond of cupcakes. Don't spread it around though.

 

==

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No worries, Pirate Dude.. Your secret's safe with me. :)

 

And even so, I am sure Ms Favell is happy to share, so to borrow from an old Dorito's commercial.. ha. "Eat all you want.. we'll bake more!" :D 

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Here is another group of films that I have finished watching:

 

Always Goodbye (1938)

Appointment in Honduras (1953)

Bambi (1942)

A Bill of Divorcement (1932)

Born to Dance (1936)

Bright Leaf (1950)

Bullfighter and the Lady (1951)

Cabiria (1914)

Cry of the City (1948)

The Deep Blue Sea (1955)

El Paso (1949)

Flaxy Martin (1949)

Gentle Annie (1944)

Guns of Darkness (1962)

The Hatchet Man (1932)

Haunted Honeymoon (1940)

If I Were King (1938)

Jennifer (1953)

The Joker Is Wild (1957)

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

Les Miserables (1935)

A Life at Stake (1954)

The Limping Man (1953)

Lost Horizon (1937)

The Mad Doctor of Market Street (1942)

Maisie Goes to Reno (1944)

The Mandarin Mystery (1936)

Mrs. Parkington (1944)

Murder Over New York (1940)

The Naked Maja (1958)

Of Human Hearts (1938)

Private Detective 62 (1933)

Riding Shotgun (1954)

Sanctuary (1961)

The Second Woman (1950)

Sin Takes a Holiday (1930)

Slattery's Hurricane (1949)

Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956)

Star Spangled Rhythm (1942)

Strange Intruder (1956)

Sucker Money (1933)

Teresa (1951)

Topaze (1933)

Torchy Runs for Mayor (1939)

Under Two Flags (1936)

Walk a Crooked Mile (1948)

The Wildcat (1921)

The Wistful Widow of Wagon Gap (1947)

 

Any thoughts from anyone?

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If I Were King (1938)

 

 

I love this movie very much!

 

It is very nearly perfect in all ways.

 

Ronald Colman philosophically and poetically buckling swashes! He tweaks the noses of the king's guard, faces down an enemy envoy and falls deeply and madly in love at first sight. He leaps over barriers both physical and metaphoric. He is cunning and fearless and becomes tongue-tied when alone with a lady. He is what all good women want a man to be. He is also what all bad women want a man to be. ;)

 

Basil Rathbone is absolutely precious as blathering King Louis XI. His humor is so dry it would mummify a squid. So beset that life and death problems bemuse him. 

 

I wish very dearly that TCM would air this movie again.

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I love this movie very much!

 

It is very nearly perfect in all ways.

 

Ronald Colman philosophically and poetically buckling swashes! He tweaks the noses of the king's guard, faces down an enemy envoy and falls deeply and madly in love at first sight. He leaps over barriers both physical and metaphoric. He is cunning and fearless and becomes tongue-tied when alone with a lady. He is what all good women want a man to be. He is also what all bad women want a man to be. ;)

 

Basil Rathbone is absolutely precious as blathering King Louis XI. His humor is so dry it would mummify a squid. So beset that life and death problems bemuse him.

 

I wish very dearly that TCM would air this movie again.

Sansfin,

I dearly love your description of this movie. Especially what you write of King Louis XI who is a favorite of European monarchs with me . What a character. Have you seen Barrymore's silent version?

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Here is another group of films that I have finished watching:

 

You really grind them out, don't you? I'm quite shamed by my paltry viewings.

 

Always Goodbye (1938) - I was rather disappointed, which is rare that I am with early Stanwyck. I blame a rushed and silly storyline.

 

Bambi (1942) - though it has been some time, it's probably the most moving Disney experience I remember. The ones told from animals' perspective usually get me. To see the view of the hunted presented so dramatically in 1942, when such practices weren't even questioned, and in a cartoon feature--is remarkable. So many people have told me how traumatic that one scene with the doe was for them.

 

A Bill of Divorcement (1932) - it is very creaky and stagey, still, seeing Kate debuting with Barrymore as her father is compelling. She came a long way after in terms of her comfort with the camera. It's interesting to see the different ways actors develop.

 

Bright Leaf (1950) - I was very disappointed. Gary's character isn't very deep to me, just spiteful. I think that Pat and Lauren might have fared better had they switched roles. Jack Carson delivers another stand-out supporting performance.

 

Bullfighter and the Lady (1951) - I absolutely adore the respect and live as it is displayed between Gilbert Roland and Katy Jurado. Truly, they are among my most admired screen couples. They both have "stature" indeed.

 

The Deep Blue Sea (1955) - Vivien again places herself in the predicament of an aging woman experiencing love and it's awkwardness in her situation. Such revealed insecurities, fears and pride--I'm not sure anyone did it better, even if the material was not the greatest (in the screen version anyway). The poor quality of the print I saw also distracted me.

 

El Paso (1949) - a wonderful cast (Gail Russell, John Payne & Sterling Hayden) gets lost in a story that drags out far too long. Gail's part is typically too brief and the male characters aren't very deep. The movie felt almost like some if the simpler silent westerns with their stereotypes. I hoped for more.

 

Gentle Annie (1944) - on the other hand, this little "B" programmer rose above its limitations and turned out to be very entertaining and sprightly. I love seeing Donna Reed so feisty and Harry Morgan in a larger than usual role at that stage. The biggest surprise was finding a James Craig character I actually liked!

 

 

The Hatchet Man (1932) - I thought this Edward G. Robinson movie about Chinese gangs very interesting. Certainly a change of face if not pace (he's still in gangster land).

 

 

If I Were King (1938) - very much enjoyed it; I love the subject (Villon) and setting (King Louis XI's reign) and thought Colman superb. I still prefer Barrymore's version slightly, but both are excellent. Best of all are any scenes between Villon and Louis matching wits.

 

 

The Joker Is Wild (1957) - Frank is in his element here and captures the highs and lows of a man in a world much like his own off-screen.

 

Lawrence of Arabia (1962) - Not a movie I can describe my feelings for in just a few short sentences. I'm interested in how it went down with you.

 

Les Miserables (1935) - I prefer this version largely for Laughton's performance. Like Lawrence, it's a timeless tale. Injustice and the unfairness of the "system" are beautifully personalized.

 

[ b]Lost Horizon (1937)[/b] - this is an odd movie I like but can't feel very warmly toward. I I admire it and find it unsettling at the same time. Interesting how imperfect man's concept of the ideal is compared to God's.

 

 

The Naked Maja (1958) - I can't help it but Franciosa really ruins it for me. Ava is ravishing, no doubt.

 

Of Human Hearts (1938) - the definition of heart wrenching mother love. Who knew Jimmy could be such a Pratt!!

 

 

Slattery's Hurricane (1949) - I suppose it is a bit of a soap opera but I really like this movie. And Veronica turns in her most poignantly touching performances.

 

Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956) - it took me a while to want to see this movie through but I ended up liking it. Again, a sport I hate makes for such a good setting for a story. I even got over Paul's New Yawk accent. Surprising to see a young Steve McQueen in a bit part.

 

Topaze (1933) - wonderfully sly and risqué. Barrymore and Myrna are delightful together.

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I dearly love your description of this movie. Especially what you write of King Louis XI who is a favorite of European monarchs with me . What a character. Have you seen Barrymore's silent version?

 

I thank you for your kind words. 

 

I am sure that I have watched John Barrymore's portrayal of F. Villon but I am sad to say that it has been many years and I do not recall it clearly.

 

I find it of interest that your favorite monarch is King Louis XI. I believe him to be one of the less-well-known French kings. I find it of interest because: Lucrezia Borgia is one of my idols. I have often read comparisons between her and King Louis XI in that they used similar methods of subtlety to achieve their goals.

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Alright Frankenstein, Here's what I think your top 10 are! YAY! This should be fun!

 

 

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

The Joker Is Wild (1957)

Bambi (1942)

Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956)

Guns of Darkness (1962)

Cry of the City (1948)

The Hatchet Man (1932)

The Deep Blue Sea (1955)

El Paso (1949)

The Naked Maja (1958)

 

I can't believe you sat through Mrs. Parkington. I know you hated it. Heehee!

 

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I haven't seen most of these films, except for classics like Lawrence of Arabia, which I love (best epic ever); Lost Horizon, which I love most of; and Mrs. Parkington (Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon are much sexier than usual; love their opening scenes, love the scene with the bustle, love Agnes Moorehead, and in general like this quite a lot.

 

Teresa is a very odd film, with all the various ingredients very well directed by Fred Zinnemann. Closest in style to The Search in its Italian scenes, but the New York half is like a number of 50s movies about overbearing moms. That nice Patricia Collinge seeks her teeth into the terrible mom role, and Pier Angeli is like a young Ingrid Bergman. None of her other work is on this level, though she's certainly good in The Angry Silence. Hollywood didn't know how to develop the very special quality she shows in this film and turns her into a generic pretty young actress.

 

I love that the John Ericson character is shown as a coward, and never redeemed. This was probably career suicide for the young actor, who's capable. It's very important that the screenplay is by Stewart Stern, who will go on to write Rebel Without a Cause. Much of that is seen in embryo here: the overbearing mother, the sensitive young man who must stand up to her, the pretty young woman who helps make a man of him. Also similar is the weird relationship where the Ericson character thinks his commanding officer is like his father (parallel with Sal Mineo allegedly seeing James Dean and Natalie Wood as his parents). Just as the Mineo/Dean relationship is sexual on Mineo's side, notice the soldier at the beginning who offers bread to Ericson--this is a pass.

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Hello there, Grey Dude. Sorry to be so late chiming in.. 

 

another group of films that I have finished watching

 

Boy, you have almost missed me completely on this list. Only just a handful that I can say I have seen or know much about at all. 

 

Bambi (1942)

 

Very dear film.. (ha.. no pun intended!!) :D  Extremely sweet and touching and utterly beautiful. Not sure how well all the "sweetness" is going to resonate with you, but I imagine if nothing else you will be able to comment on the beauty of it. 

 

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

 

Other than Bambi.. this one is probably the only other one on your list I could comment on very much. It is an amazing film. (and one of the rare classic films that I can actually say I have seen on the big screen.. not once, but TWICE even) It is a very good story. Very amazing plot and very amazing performance by OToole.(and was there ever anyone onscreen past or present who was so lovely as he?? Wowsa. He was so 'purty" it almost hurts to look at him) :)  Can't say I have ANY love in my heart for that character.. but oh ME he was something.  I would be very interested in hearing your thoughts on it all. 

 

Les Miserables (1935

Have not seen this version of that particular story, but I have seen (most of) another more modern telling. 

 

Lost Horizon (1937)

I can't call this one a huge favorite. I saw it several years ago and remember commenting on it elsewhere on the message board. It has some things that I like very much.. but the story overall is not one I personally found to be my cup of tea, though I can't remember enough about it to carry too much of a conversation on it all now. Colman was good (and a few others as I recall) Just not a huge favorite. 

 

Mrs. Parkington (1944)

I have not seen this one in a good long while (and may have only seen it once) but I do remember liking it overall. I like stories that are centered around the "comeuppance" of greedy family members.. ha. (I like to see them put in their place.. ha!) so that aspect of it is always going to be fun.. but I also like the "back story" too. (as I recall.. though I do confess I can't remember as much about it as I should to say for certain) 

 

Of Human Hearts (1938)


At first I did not recognize the title of this one and then after talking to Miss G recently I realized that I HAVE seen this film but it has been a VERY long while. I wish I had a better memory for the entire story, but oh that Jimmy.. ha. He was in need of a "comeuppance" himself in this one, wasn't he??
 

That is about all that I have seen on your list this time (even less than usual for me this go around) but I will l look forward to hearing more about some of the titles  you have on here. Miss G even pointed out a few that were on youtube to me, so I am hoping to watch a couple of them (will try to get to them soon, I hope, but can't say for sure what my week is going to look like) and maybe could chime in on a couple more if I can get a chance to watch before the conversation runs out.  

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I will look to reply to everyone tomorrow evening.  Thank you for replying!

 

1. Bambi (1942) -- Oh wow, what a great Disney film.  This is now one of my favorites.  I just loved the atmosphere, one of both great innocence and great fear.  The parental worry of attempting to protect one's child while also teaching them so they can do so on their own.  I love the mixing of light and darkness in this picture.  The villain is one of the best in a Disney film.  That really made the film to me.  Loved seeing the animals.  The movement of the animals is wonderful.  The entire look of the film is beautiful.

 

bambi3_zps5fr9n42f.jpg

 

2. Lawrence of Arabia (1962) -- It took me a little while to get into this film but I eventually got there.  David Lean does an excellent job of building characters, especially Lawrence (Peter O'Toole).  To see Lawrence start off as a go-getting officer who feels he can conquer the world to a disillusioned puppet of a man who sees the politics of war for what they are was truly remarkable.  The long journey is rewarding in a character-study way.  Not to mention the breathtaking visuals found in this film.  They are something to behold.  Also bringing much great depth and pleasure to the picture are Omar Sharif and Anthony Quinn, who help to both hinder and aid Lawrence along his odyssey.  They are both tremendous.

 

3. The Wistful Widow of Wagon Gap (1947) -- This is one of the funniest Abbott & Costello films I have watched to date.  When outsider Chester (Lou Costello) accidentally shoots a man dead, he is confronted with an option: be hanged or assume the responsibilities of the deceased.  The choice seems obvious, right?  Ha!  What ensues is some great comedic turns by Abbott and Costello with the help of our lovely widow, played hilariously by Marjorie Main.  The major twist in this film is an absolute riot.

 

wistfulwidowofwagongap1_zpscbozttbb.jpg

 

4. Bullfighter and the Lady (1951) -- While the arena of bullfighting is definitely not my kind of thing to watch, all of the characters in this film are.  Egotistical American Johnny Regan (Robert Stack) falls under the spell of bullfighting while vacationing in Mexico.  Thanks to the help of the great matador Manolo (Gilbert Roland), he sets out to enter the arena and take on his greatest challenge.  Budd Boetticher directs this film with amazing beauty.  It's a gorgeous looking film.  The bullfighting scenes are superb.  The care given to the relationships in the film is also done beautifully.  And it's the relationships that really heighten this film.  Roland is once again sensational.  The guy is terrific. Katy Jurado plays Gilbert's wife with great emotion.  She's another great performer.  I also loved Joy Page, who plays the "Mexican" love interest of Stack.  Love her energy.  This is a lovely, understated picture.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-7KERKaphM

 

5. Flaxy Martin (1949) -- An under-the-radar film noir that is made better by its cast of Virginia Mayo, Zachary Scott, and Dorothy Malone.  The film is about a double-cross, one that places the love-struck Walter Colby (Zachary Scott) in a major predicament.  His object of desire?  Flaxy (Virginia Mayo)!  Virginia is a peach in this one.  She's got the Miss Goddess charms working in this one.  Elisha Cook, Jr. plays another memorable character.  In fact, I find his scenes to be on par with his in Phantom Lady.  He's terrific. The film itself plays similarly to Impact.  It's quite enjoyable.

 

6. Of Human Hearts (1938) -- If you are looking for a good "Mother's Day" picture, this one would qualify.  And if you love horses, this one has one of my favorites: "Pilgrim".  As the story goes, Jason (James Stewart) is growing up in a religiously-rigid household.  His father is the new preacher in town, played sternly by the brilliant Walter Huston.  Jason resents the firm hand of his father and aspires to become something more worldly.  He wishes to be a doctor.  His mentor is the town doc (Charles Coburn), who doesn't play by the rigid rules of religion.  The clash between father and son ultimately places mother Mary (Beulah Bondi) smack in the middle.  The love of Mary permeates the film.  It's beautiful.  This is a folksy, homespun film told in a loving way.  It's a sweet film.  There's also an important scene featuring John Carradine who plays Abraham Lincoln.

 

7. Walk a Crooked Mile (1948) -- As a rule, I usually don't care for the "Red Scare" films noir.  They tend to be so one-sided with a forced way of thinking.  Well, this one is actually enjoyable.  The reason being, the pairing of Dennis O'Keefe and Louis Hayward.  O'Keefe plays an American F.B.I. agent and Hayward is from Scotland Yard.  The two team up to try and figure out who is leaking info at an atomic energy plant.  The film plays as a "buddy" pic and this helps enliven what could otherwise be a bland, flag-waving docu-noir.  It's rather good.  It doesn't hurt that Raymond Burr is also around.  There's no way he'd be a spy.  Get out!

 

8. Appointment in Honduras (1953) -- Glenn Ford stars in this "jungle" flick by Jacques Tourneur as a committed American rebel to a South American freedom-fighting cause.  In order to make his "appointment in Honduras", he enlists some criminals to help guide him through the thick jungle.  Ann Sheridan and Zachary Scott, a married American couple, are captives caught in Ford's journey.  What makes this film so enjoyable is Ford's no-nonsense "Jim Corbett".  He is bound and determined to meet his destination.  I love it when Ford is like this.  Just a really good role for him.

 

 

 

appointmentinhonduras1_zps3mxyuvza.jpg

 

9. Bright Leaf (1950) -- I have to say, I was mostly fascinated by seeing Gary Cooper play the character he does in this picture.  What kind of character does he play?  A self-made tobacco magnate who is tortured by his love for one woman, played exceptionally by Miss Goddess (Patricia Neal).  Neal sure does know how to wreck Coop!  But wait, there is more.  This happens to be a triangle pic.  Brothel-owner Sonia (Lauren Bacall) has a soft spot for Coop.  And he likes her, too.  But he doesn't love her like Lady Margaret Jane (Pat).  I really liked the demons found in this film.  I think it's one of Coop's best characters and performances.  You'll also find Jack Carson in the film, who is carrying a torch for Sonia.

 

 

 

brightleaf1_zpsxzxvjjjn.jpg

 

10. The Wildcat (1921) -- As with most Ernst Lubitsch films, this one features a great deal of charm.  It is very similar to the musicals that Lubitsch would soon make with Maurice Chevalier.  The story is about a military man (Victor Janson) who is kidnapped by bandits.  At their hideout, a "wildcat" (Pola Negri) falls for the officer, and he for her.  Eventually, the two are separated.  But that won't hold back our wildcat from pursuing her love interest.  The ending is quite different than what I was expecting, pleasantly so.  This film is highly Lubitschian.  The fantastical is just right.  Also, Lubitsch uses many visual tricks to create a much more fanciful world.  It ends up looking like a big toy box.  It's quite fascinating.

 

wildcat3_zps46bfsegd.jpg

 

11. Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956) -- What is it with boxing pictures and their ability to produce such great drama?  I almost always go for them.  This one is a biopic of Rocky Graziano with Paul Newman playing "Rocky".  While the film doesn't set any standards for boxing films, it does manage to stand on its own.  Director Robert Wise ably develops the back story for Rocky at the outset of the film, and then lets the boxing and relationships develop.  I particularly loved Rocky's final boxing match and how it was shown from the outside.  It's nicely done.  Pier Angeli plays Rocky's wife, Norma.  She's really sweet.  I also liked Everett Sloane as Rocky's manager.

 

12. The Naked Maja (1958) -- Ava Gardner in a film with "naked" in the title.  Of course I'm going to go for this! :D  This is a story about famed Spanish painter Goya.  Despite the fact that Anthony Franciosa plays "Goya", I liked it.  Why?  Ava!  I feel this is one of Ava's best characters and performances.  She plays "Duchess Alba", a woman with some power and standing who enthralls Goya.  I can see why!  Ava often hits the right notes when it comes to alluring.  And what I love about her kind of alluring is that she allows you to touch her.  She's never a tease.  The film is mostly about the relationship between Goya and the Duchess with some freedom of expression power struggles mixed in.

 

13. The Joker Is Wild (1957) -- In some ways, this is Frank Sinatra's "The Hustler" mixed with "Some Came Running".  Frank plays "Joe E. Lewis", a rising singing star who thinks he's invincible.  Events change that forever.  His life goes wayward and he spends the rest of his days trying to find himself again.  Eddie Albert plays his loyal friend and pianist, "Austin Mack".  Eddie is so good at playing the "pal".  He's great, here.  The lovely Jeanne Crain plays Frank's love interest, a woman of breeding that Frank feels is above her.  Mitzi Gaynor is a show girl who plays a major role in Frank's life in the second half of the film.  All of the principals are good.  I was pleasantly surprised by this bittersweet drama.

 

 

 

14. The Deep Blue Sea (1955) -- Vivien Leigh surely played some compelling women in her day.  Women lost in the dark.  Here, she's lost in the  "deep blue sea", as it were.  Viv's "Hester" is a woman who has left her respectable, kind, older husband (Emlyn Williams) for the younger, passionate, unreliable Freddie (Kenneth More).  In an ironic twist, Hester finds herself playing the role her ex-husband used to play with her.  Can she survive her own love?  This is a dark one.  A dark challenge of love.  While the story plays out slowly it does finish on a high.  Eric Portman's presence in the film as a doctor, as a "wise force", is invaluable.  He really brings the film home.  That and Viv's performance, particularly late.

 

 

 

15. Teresa (1951) -- A rather unique Fred Zinnemann film that starts off as a war pic but ends up a familial struggle.  The one constant thread through the film is the personal growth of Philip (John Ericson).  Philip is a young man who has never had his own voice.  He eventually meets "Teresa" (Pier Angeli) in bombed-out Italy during World War II.  The two fall in love and this sets up the final act, one that finds them back in America.  This would be the anti-Of Human Hearts.  It's a "Mother's Day" flick for much different reasons.  Patricia Collinge plays Philip's mother and she's far from her "Emma Newton" in Shadow of a Doubt.  You could say this is "Rebel With a Cause".

 

 

 

16. Riding Shotgun (1954) -- A shade of High Noon can be found in this Andre De Toth western, as "Larry Delong" (Randolph Scott) finds himself battling a distrusting town while real threats are about to converge.  Like many Randy Scott westerns, this one has a feel of authenticity brought about by his own aura.  His presence alone elevates ordinary westerns.  This would be the case, here.  There isn't one standout thing about this film but it still pleases because of Scott.

 

17. Slattery's Hurricane (1949) -- With a cast of Richard Widmark, Linda Darnell, and Veronica Lake, I had very high hopes for this film.  It's a film I've been wanting to see for a while.  Well, it fell short of my lofty wishes.  Still, it's very solid.  The story revolves around Slattery (Richard Widmark), a former WWII pilot who is making a living as a private plane pilot for a drug dealer.  He aspires to have a more important job, one of flying meteorological missions for the Navy, where his pal (John Russell) works.  Slattery's life is turned upside down when his pal introduces him to his new girl, who happens to be Slattery's old flame (Linda Darnell).  To make things more complicated, Slattery is married to Dolores (Veronica Lake).  The story is rather messy and it never fully reaches a dramatic height.

 

slatteryshurricane1_zpsh2bwkcpy.jpg

 

18. Cry of the City (1948) -- A film noir take on the classic gangster era story of childhood friends who go different ways.  Here, Victor Mature plays a cop while his childhood friend, played by Richard Conte, is a thug.  It's the strong performances by both Mature and Conte combined with the beautiful NYC location shooting that help make this film.  I didn't find the story to be the strongest.  It's nothing special.  But I do love seeing Mature and Conte together.  Debra Paget plays Conte's innocent love interest that he's looking to protect.  Shelley Winters also has a minor role.  Hope Emerson has a scene you would never suspect her to have in the film.  Oh, my.  And Fred Clark as a cynical, jerk detective?  Huh?  Interesting casting.

 

cryofthecity3_zpsao4cmta8.jpg

 

19. Murder Over New York (1940) -- Another quality "Charlie Chan" offering.  In this outing, Charlie (Sidney Toler) takes on the case of his friend, a murdered Scotland Yard detective.  The case is about the crash of a British test plane, one that wreaks of sabotage. The best Chans feature good twists and intelligent scripting of crimes and forensic resolutions.  This one has all of that.  It also doesn't hurt that Ricardo Cortez is on hand again as a prime suspect.

 

 

 

20. Les Miserables (1935) -- This was my first exposure to Victor Hugo's "Les Miserables" story and I mostly liked it.  To see Fredric March and Charles Laughton matching wits was quite a joy.  Ol' Chuck sure can play the unlikable so very well.  He's wonderful.  And I do like March in the 30s.  What I liked most about the story was actually the "father/daughter" story.  I loved the sacrifice.  I also enjoyed the commentary on law and forgiveness.  Good stuff.

 

21. If I Were King (1938) -- The playfulness of Ronald Colman's "Villon" is so very winning in this picture.  He's definitely playing my kind of rascal.  Basil Rathbone is also quite good as "King Louis XI".  Amusement seems to be his driving force.  I really like it when Colman plays fast and loose.  It suits him well.  I especially like the poetic philosophy of "Villon" and his championing the poor.  Certainly my kind of themes.  That's what you get when Preston Sturges is behind the script.  It's a fun film.

 

Serious audio delay with this link:

 

 

 

22. Private Detective 62 (1933) -- Not the best of William Powell but still enjoyable.  Powell plays a disgraced diplomat who eludes the law and eventually takes up with a private detective and legitimizes his business.  Most of his work revolves around his spying on rich, married women who are suspected of cheating.  Margaret Lindsay is his latest target.  And she's quite lovely.  Ruth Donnelly plays the secretary at the detective agency.  She's rather cute.  Powell is entertaining, but not as charming as he is in his best work.

 

23. Topaze (1933) -- At first, I thought this film was going to be an American take on The Blue Angel.  It isn't.  It's a comedy about a do-good professor named Topaze (John Barrymore), a man who hasn't lived in the "real world" and who ends up being tossed into the dishonest world of business and selling products.  The experience is an eye-opener for Topaze, who "grows up" and becomes wise to the ways of the world.  Barrymore is excellent.  He plays "Topaze" in a similar fashion that Peter Sellers and Alec Guinness would use years later.  He's really amusing.  Myrna Loy plays a character you rarely see her play: a mistress.  Her name is "Coco".  Delicious!  This is such a pleasing film.  It was originally a play by Marcel Pagnol, who also wrote the "Fanny" trilogy.

 

24. Guns of Darkness (1962) -- David Niven and Leslie Caron caught up in a South American coup?  Say what?!  That just doesn't seem possible.  But it is.  And it's actually decent.  While the setting and situations are centered around a wounded, deposed president of a South American country, the heart of the matter is the relationship between Niven and Caron.  The two play a married couple who have been drifting apart.  The film almost plays as a pseudo-African Queen because of the journey they encounter together.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hGFVsOFZbE

 

25. Maisie Goes to Reno (1944) -- It's Ava Gardner in a "Maisie" movie!  All right!  Ava is playing a sweetheart of a woman in this one.  She's a rich woman who is in the dark when it comes to the goings on around her.  Maisie (Ann Sothern) is on hand to help shine some light.  Tom Drake plays Ava's jettisoned husband, a soldier who is trying to get back in her good graces.  John Hodiak plays Maisie's love interest.

 

26. Torchy Runs for Mayor (1939) -- Torchy gets down and dirty in the final Glenda Farrell "Torchy".  She does some illegal deeds to get the story and expose the criminal activities of the mayor's office.  Eventually, she chooses to run for mayor, thus risking her own life in the process.  I was surprised by the darkness in this "Torchy".  That's atypical for the series.

 

27. Gentle Annie (1944) -- A thoroughly sweet film that centers around a train-robbing family and private investigator who befriends them.  Marjorie Main plays the titular character, who, along with her two sons (Harry Morgan and Paul Langton), have benefited from a train heist.  Enter James Craig, an undercover agent who is taken in by the friendly family.  Donna Reed brings her own brand sweetness to the film, as she is the object of affection for Langton and Craig.  "Gentle" really is the right word for this picture.

 

28. Sanctuary (1961) -- A very strange and salacious story from William Faulkner.  The story is about Temple Drake (Lee Remick), a tease of a young woman who ends up encountering the attractive but dangerous "Candy Man" (Yves Montand), a bootlegger.  What happens after this is a mess.  It's best to see it yourself.  It's out there.  No one's a winner in this one.  Singer Odetta turns in a sterling performance as "Nancy", who is Candy Man's housekeeper for a spell.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMnzFM_Sq8s

 

29. Always Goodbye (1938) -- On the heels of Stella Dallas comes another "mother" flick for Barbara Stanwyck.  Here, Barbara places her baby up for adoption due to circumstances.  A couple years later, she runs into her son.  A relationship quickly builds.  This creates a major dilemma for Barbara.  Does she attempt to remain in her son's life or choose to be with the man (Herbert Marshall) she loves?  If you are one to like "mother" pictures, I feel this one is pretty good.  The ending is the best.  And, for once, I was not annoyed by the little boy (Johnny Russell).

 

 

 

30. Under Two Flags (1936) -- In an odd way, I see this film as a desert "My Darling Clementine".  Ronald Colman once again plays a charming rascal who begins to find himself in the French Legion.  He soon falls for the charms of Cigarette (Claudette Colbert), a passionate woman who runs a local club.  In due time, Colman's former love, the prim and proper daughter of an officer, Lady Venetia (Rosalind Russell), blows into camp.  Who will Ronald choose?  What really spices this film up is the presence of Victor McLaglen, who is Colman's superior and who is also in love with "Cigarette".  The actual story lacks teeth but the soap is mostly compelling.

 

 

 

31. The Limping Man (1953) -- A foreign intrigue film starring Lloyd Bridges that starts off with a bang.  From there, the film becomes a whodunit with Bridges caught in the middle.  Moira Lister plays Lloyd's past flame, "Pauline".  She is a prime a suspect that leaves Lloyd wondering if she could be involved in the mystery.  And who the heck is this limping fella?!  What actually adds to this film is that it takes place around a stage hall, ala Stage Fright.  There's a number with Helene Cordet that is quite entertaining.

 

 

 

32. Jennifer (1953) -- Ida Lupino in The Shining!  Well, sort of.  Ida is asked to house sit an empty estate and then strange doings start to occur.  Are they real or imagined?  What really happened in this house?  Is Ida losing her mind?  While the film doesn't live up to its potential, it is genuinely creepy at times.  The story does get sidetracked by the boring Howard Duff, but there's still enough atmosphere to make the film "good enough".

 

 

33. A Life at Stake (1954) -- Angela Lansbury is up to her naughty tricks again.  This time, she is the bored wife of an older, wealthy real estate man (Douglas Dumbrille).  To pass the time, Angela decides to start her own real estate project.  She wishes to build some homes on her land, so she needs a builder.  Enter beefy Keith Andes.  Let the games begin.  Oh, Angela.

 

 

lifeatstake1_zpsceyctuen.jpg

 

34. Strange Intruder (1956) -- This is an odd kind of film noir with a tinge of horror.  It is somewhat reminiscent of Ernst Lubitsch's Broken Lullaby in that a soldier returns to the States with the idea of seeking out the family of a friend, who was killed in action. His friend's dying request is what he seeks to keep.  But what is this request?  Edmund Purdom plays the returning soldier.  The Carmichael family is who he meets and spends time with.  Ida Lupino plays the fallen's wife and Carl Benton Reid and Ann Harding are his parents.  But the two most important figures in the family are the fallen's young children (Mimi Gibson and Eric Anderson).  They seem to be at the center of it all.  There is some good tension at film's end, which makes this a solid programmer.

 

 

35. Haunted Honeymoon (1940) -- Robert Montgomery and Constance Cummings take a crack at their own "The Thin Man" in this breezy murder mystery.  The chemistry and script on not on par with Nick & Nora, but it's enjoyable enough.  Peter (Robert) is a private detective while his fiancee Harriet (Constance) is a mystery writer.  The two are moving into their new home, a home that finds a dead body.  Curious.  Talented British performers, such as Robert Newton, Leslie Banks, and Googie Withers help add some class to the film.  It's just that the script and its pay-off let them down.

 

36. The Mad Doctor of Market Street (1942) -- A horror film starring Lionel Atwill and directed by Joseph H. Lewis surely had me excited.  The results weren't as thrilling.  Lionel plays a doctor who is attempting to bring people back from the dead.  The problem is, he is creating some of the dead.  This causes him to flee the country via ship.  Eventually, he and other shipmates land on an island with natives and the good doctor's powers are put to use.  For good or bad?  Hmmmmm... Una Merkel and Nat Pendleton provide the comic relief, making the film the strange mix of horror and comedy that the previous decade often utilized.

 

37. El Paso (1949) -- John Payne, Sterling Hayden, and Gail Russell!  What headliners!  But, once again, the stars are greater than the material.  What does make this western interesting is that it actually promotes "an eye for eye", at least for a while.  That gave the film a different feel.  The story is about a lawyer (John Payne) who comes to town to find out his father's friend (Henry Hull) is a lost soul due to booze and the town has turned corrupt thanks to land-hungry Bert Donner (Sterling Hayden).  Gail plays Hull's daughter, who Payne has feelings for.  Mary Beth Hughes and Gabby Hayes are around to provide some yuks.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSKELaPnvLE

 

38. The Second Woman (1950) -- A promising beginning to this film is undermined by its stagnant direction and storytelling.  I wasn't too keen on the twist ending and its conclusion, either.  Not to mention, Betsy Drake was a rather bland female lead.  But even with those warts, there are some redeeming qualities to the film.  The mysterious doings that are happening around Jeff (Robert Young) keep your attention.  If Jeff doesn't have a death wish, someone has one for him.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvF8p7hJBeM

 

39. The Hatchet Man (1932) -- Edward G. Robinson is the star of this peculiar William Wellman film about ancient Chinese traditions and the changing times.  Robinson is the "Hatchet Man", an honorable man who is in charge of offing those the elders deem must be done in due to their violation of the ancient code and principles.  Eddie is asked to do in his friend.  Before his demise, his friend bequeaths his baby girl to Eddie.  The baby girl grows up to be Loretta Young.  How nice!  The film then starts to mirror Loretta's silent with Lon Chaney, Laugh, Clown, Laugh.  The film is not your typical film, I'll say that.

 

hatchetman1_zpsomwezryr.jpg

 

40. Sin Takes a Holiday (1930) -- A merry-go-round of love that runs awry.  Constance Bennett ends up marrying her boss (Kenneth MacKenna), who is simply looking to avoid the advances of another woman.  In other words, it's all a game for the boss.  Connie eventually goes abroad, alone, where she runs into her boss' friend, Reggie (Basil Rathbone).  The two soon start an affair.  Hence our title.  Will they end up together or will Connie stay with her husband?  I found all of the love in the film to be shallow.  None of the guys were likable to me.

 

 

41. Sucker Money (1933) -- Mischa Auer as a phony spiritualist!  It's unlike any role I had seen him play before.  Auer as "Swami Yomurda" is the best thing about this light 30s horror pic.  He's basically in a Bela Lugosi role.  Quite a refreshing change.  The rest of the film features uninteresting 30s performers and storytelling.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XiWnirftd0

 

42. Lost Horizon (1937) -- If there is one thing that is almost a given to bore me to death it's spiritualism that leads to peace of mind.  I immediately think of The Razor's Edge and Tyrone Power's "Larry Darrell" as exhibit A of boring.  Now the beginning of this film did interest me.  It reminded me of She.  But the minute we arrive at Shangri-La, the film goes downhill with me.  It feels like everyone becomes brain dead.  I did enjoy the selfishness of John Howard in the film and the She-like fate of Margo.  That was good.

 

43. The Mandarin Mystery (1936) -- I'm not that familiar with Eddie Quillan or "Ellery Queen", but I wasn't impressed with either in this one.  Eddie is "Ellery", a wanna-be sleuth whose father, Inspector Queen (Wade Boteler), attempts to keep under his thumb.  His father never succeeds.  When two people turn up dead and a valuable stamp goes missing, Ellery decides to go a sleuthing.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmDUbs-KDj8

 

44. A Bill of Divorcement (1932) -- A creaky George Cukor film about mental illness and how it was perceived back in the day.  John Barrymore plays "Hilary", a man who has spent years in a mental asylum who finally returns home.  Upon his return, he soon learns that his wife (Billie Burke) has moved on from him and is now in love with another.  Can the two reconcile after all these years?  Also involved is Sidney (Katharine Hepburn in her screen debut), his daughter.  What kind of relationship can these two now have?  The premise is good but the film just doesn't dig too deep, which is often the case during these days.  The ending is what I liked best about the film.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CexLVkQ2sSo

 

45. Born to Dance (1936) -- This one was a roller coaster.  The first two numbers in this musical had me frightened to watch the rest of the film.  But then Cole Porter finally kicked in with "Hey, Babe, Hey".  That was a lovely song and performed by all of the key performers in the cast.  And then we get "Easy to Love" and Virginia Bruce sings "I've Got You Under My Skin".  At this point, I'm okay with the film.  But the final act just takes the film down for me.  The "put on a show" stuff kills me.  The story itself was all right.  No great shakes.  I definitely liked seeing James Stewart in a musical.  I never knew Buddy Ebsen could dance like that.  He reminded me of a young Will Rogers, for some reason.  I also liked Una Merkel and Virginia and her pekinese.  Eleanor Powell?  Not so much.  I'll have to see how she fares with me in future films.

 

46. Mrs. Parkington (1944) -- It's becoming more and more clear, I struggle with "life stories" unless it's Citizen Kane.  I just go nuts over these drawn-out stories of when two people meet, they get married, they have kids, one of the kids dies, and then the spouse dies, then a parent dies, then they are old.  Ugh!  What I did like about the film was Walter Pidgeon's come-ons to Greer Garson when they first meet.  Walter Pidgeon!

 

47. Cabiria (1914) -- In terms of spectacle, this Italian silent needs to be seen.  It's very impressive in terms of sets and costumes.  It's remarkable, really.  In terms of story, I was completely lost and eventually uninterested.  As far as I could gather, the story is about two men who look over a little girl, Cabiria.  They lose the girl and spend their years attempting to find her again.  In this way, the film mirrors The Searchers.

 

 

48. Star Spangled Rhythm (1942) -- A war-time musical comedy that never strikes the right chord.  My favorite number in the film is easily "A Sweater, a Sarong, and a Peak-a-Boo Bang" performed by Paulette Goddard, Dorothy Lamour, and Veronica Lake.  That alone helped me like the film some.  My favorite skit is the sexist "Card-Playing Skit" where Ray Milland, Fred MacMurray, Franchot Tone, and Lynne Overman pretend to behave like women playing poker.  It's rich.  Bob Hope's skit is pretty good. Alan Ladd's skit is over in a blink.  Betty Hutton, Eddie Bracken, and Victor Moore are the driving force of the film.  I do like Betty.  Preston Sturges and Cecil B. DeMille also appear in the film.  Preston's scene is pretty funny.

 

starspangledrhythm1_zpsggbmlzr2.jpg

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This may be the list that I have seen fewer movies than any other.  However, of what I have seen I tend to follow your ranking - more or less. 

 

"Lawrence of Arabia" is a massive undertaking and they mostly carry the story for all of its time. Like Ro, I have seen it on the big screen because it needed to be seen there. O'Toole is brilliant and it is often exciting and beautifully filmed. I often like epics just for my amazement that of what goes into making the picture.

 

"Wistful Widow of Wagon Gap." It's been a LONG time since I saw it but I liked it because, if I recall, it was rather different in the setting than most A&C pictures. (Try "Time of Their Lives" if you haven't seen it. They are different there.)

 

"Of Human Hearts" I  saw recently and if ever a man was born to play the father it was Walter Huston. Stern, rigid and unbending often with a hint of love under it but suffocating most of the time. I found myself getting annoyed somewhat with Stewart's character because he seemed to take his mom for granted. Bondi is wonderful.

 

"Somebody Up There Likes Me." I don't remember much of it but I thought they paid him a pretty good compliment by casting Newman. I remember Graciano on TV after his career. He was fun but he certainly lacked Newman's good looks.

 

"If I Were King." It's been a while but always liked about anything Colman has done. That includes his bit as neighbor to Jack Benny on Benny's radio program. ("The Prisoner of Zenda" hopefully is on one of your lists.)

 

Take care.

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Good evening, SansFin -- Ronald Colman philosophically and poetically buckling swashes! He tweaks the noses of the king's guard, faces down an enemy envoy and falls deeply and madly in love at first sight. He leaps over barriers both physical and metaphoric. He is cunning and fearless and becomes tongue-tied when alone with a lady. He is what all good women want a man to be. He is also what all bad women want a man to be. ;)

 

What a lovely description of Colman in If I Were King!  Superb!

 

Basil Rathbone is absolutely precious as blathering King Louis XI. His humor is so dry it would mummify a squid. So beset that life and death problems bemuse him. 

 

Mummify a squid?!  Ha!  Can't say that I have heard that before.

 

I wish very dearly that TCM would air this movie again.

 

So do I.  The uploaded film at YouTube has a horrendous sync problem.

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Howdy, Texas Two-Step -- Alright Frankenstein, Here's what I think your top 10 are! YAY! This should be fun!

 

All right!

 

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

The Joker Is Wild (1957)

Bambi (1942)

Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956)

Guns of Darkness (1962)

Cry of the City (1948)

The Hatchet Man (1932)

The Deep Blue Sea (1955)

El Paso (1949)

The Naked Maja (1958)

 

That's some fine guessing, T!  You pretty much hit on many films that placed right around my top ten, including picking my top two.

 

I can't believe you sat through Mrs. Parkington. I know you hated it. Heehee!

 

I can't believe I made it through! :P

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Hey there, Kingrat -- I haven't seen most of these films, except for classics like Lawrence of Arabia, which I love (best epic ever); Lost Horizon, which I love most of; and Mrs. Parkington (Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon are much sexier than usual; love their opening scenes, love the scene with the bustle, love Agnes Moorehead, and in general like this quite a lot.

 

I'm amazed I have watched some films others haven't seen!  Talk about a rarity.

 

I also liked the opening scenes with Walter and Greer in Mrs. Parkington.  That was my favorite part of the film, for sure.  What do you love about Lost Horizon?

 

Teresa is a very odd film, with all the various ingredients very well directed by Fred Zinnemann. Closest in style to The Search in its Italian scenes, but the New York half is like a number of 50s movies about overbearing moms. That nice Patricia Collinge seeks her teeth into the terrible mom role, and Pier Angeli is like a young Ingrid Bergman. None of her other work is on this level, though she's certainly good in The Angry Silence. Hollywood didn't know how to develop the very special quality she shows in this film and turns her into a generic pretty young actress.

 

That's an excellent description of Teresa.  It really is an odd film.  I'll have to check out The Angry Silence.  Your comparison of Pier to Ingrid in the film is quite interesting.

 

I love that the John Ericson character is shown as a coward, and never redeemed. This was probably career suicide for the young actor, who's capable. It's very important that the screenplay is by Stewart Stern, who will go on to write Rebel Without a Cause. Much of that is seen in embryo here: the overbearing mother, the sensitive young man who must stand up to her, the pretty young woman who helps make a man of him. Also similar is the weird relationship where the Ericson character thinks his commanding officer is like his father (parallel with Sal Mineo allegedly seeing James Dean and Natalie Wood as his parents). Just as the Mineo/Dean relationship is sexual on Mineo's side, notice the soldier at the beginning who offers bread to Ericson--this is a pass.

 

It certainly was a brave role for Ericson, one that I appreciated.  He comes off well in Italy but he's a serious weakling in the States.  He does end up showing some backbone by the very end, at least.

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Hola, Queen of the Furies -- Boy, you have almost missed me completely on this list. Only just a handful that I can say I have seen or know much about at all. 

 

I seem to have missed most everyone with this list!

 

Bambi (1942)

 

Very dear film.. (ha.. no pun intended!!) :D  Extremely sweet and touching and utterly beautiful. Not sure how well all the "sweetness" is going to resonate with you, but I imagine if nothing else you will be able to comment on the beauty of it. 

 

I loved the sweetness of it!  I like animals, so this one really struck a chord with me.  And it really is a beautiful film.

 

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

 

Other than Bambi.. this one is probably the only other one on your list I could comment on very much. It is an amazing film. (and one of the rare classic films that I can actually say I have seen on the big screen.. not once, but TWICE even) It is a very good story. Very amazing plot and very amazing performance by OToole.(and was there ever anyone onscreen past or present who was so lovely as he?? Wowsa. He was so 'purty" it almost hurts to look at him) :)  Can't say I have ANY love in my heart for that character.. but oh ME he was something.  I would be very interested in hearing your thoughts on it all. 

 

You have a thing for Peter O'Toole?  You?  Who knew?!  I'm impressed that you have seen Lawrence of Arabia on the big screen, twice.  That's a great one to see on the big screen!

 

Lost Horizon (1937)

I can't call this one a huge favorite. I saw it several years ago and remember commenting on it elsewhere on the message board. It has some things that I like very much.. but the story overall is not one I personally found to be my cup of tea, though I can't remember enough about it to carry too much of a conversation on it all now. Colman was good (and a few others as I recall) Just not a huge favorite. 

 

I remember you discussing it on "Rambles", I believe.  Since I hadn't seen the film yet, I didn't read what was being written.  I wasn't too enthralled with the picture, either.

 

Mrs. Parkington (1944)

I have not seen this one in a good long while (and may have only seen it once) but I do remember liking it overall. I like stories that are centered around the "comeuppance" of greedy family members.. ha. (I like to see them put in their place.. ha!) so that aspect of it is always going to be fun.. but I also like the "back story" too. (as I recall.. though I do confess I can't remember as much about it as I should to say for certain) 

 

The whole annoying thing is a back story! :P

 

Of Human Hearts (1938)


At first I did not recognize the title of this one and then after talking to Miss G recently I realized that I HAVE seen this film but it has been a VERY long while. I wish I had a better memory for the entire story, but oh that Jimmy.. ha. He was in need of a "comeuppance" himself in this one, wasn't he??

 

I was for him, but then he lost me when he didn't keep in touch with his mother.  Although, there was a war going on.
 

That is about all that I have seen on your list this time (even less than usual for me this go around) but I will l look forward to hearing more about some of the titles  you have on here. Miss G even pointed out a few that were on youtube to me, so I am hoping to watch a couple of them (will try to get to them soon, I hope, but can't say for sure what my week is going to look like) and maybe could chime in on a couple more if I can get a chance to watch before the conversation runs out.

 

Many are available to watch on YouTube, actually.

 

I must have screwed up the Abbott & Costello film, because I thought you suggested it to me.  It's one you'd really like.  It also doesn't have Bud slapping Lou, as far as I can remember.  It's too bad Gentle Annie isn't on YouTube.  That's one you'd probably like.

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Howdy, Cowboy Chris --  I did see your post out west.  I hope to answer you.

 

This may be the list that I have seen fewer movies than any other.  However, of what I have seen I tend to follow your ranking - more or less. 

 

Yet another I have unintentionally stumped!

 

"Lawrence of Arabia" is a massive undertaking and they mostly carry the story for all of its time. Like Ro, I have seen it on the big screen because it needed to be seen there. O'Toole is brilliant and it is often exciting and beautifully filmed. I often like epics just for my amazement that of what goes into making the picture.

 

I'm not one for epics, typically, but I liked this one.  The visuals really are stunning.  The entire vastness of the film is surely felt.  Great performances abound.

 

"Wistful Widow of Wagon Gap." It's been a LONG time since I saw it but I liked it because, if I recall, it was rather different in the setting than most A&C pictures. (Try "Time of Their Lives" if you haven't seen it. They are different there.)

 

I haven't seen that one but I do have it on DVD.  I shall watch it for the next group of films.

 

"Of Human Hearts" I  saw recently and if ever a man was born to play the father it was Walter Huston. Stern, rigid and unbending often with a hint of love under it but suffocating most of the time. I found myself getting annoyed somewhat with Stewart's character because he seemed to take his mom for granted. Bondi is wonderful.

 

I agree with all you wrote.  Huston is sensational as the stern father and Beulah is sweet as the understanding mother.

 

"Somebody Up There Likes Me." I don't remember much of it but I thought they paid him a pretty good compliment by casting Newman. I remember Graciano on TV after his career. He was fun but he certainly lacked Newman's good looks.

 

I have never seen the real Rocky Graziano, which probably was to my benefit in terms of watching the film.  If I knew how he really was, I may have struggled with Paul Newman playing him.

 

"If I Were King." It's been a while but always liked about anything Colman has done. That includes his bit as neighbor to Jack Benny on Benny's radio program. ("The Prisoner of Zenda" hopefully is on one of your lists.)

 

He was his neighbor on the radio program?  That's terrific!  What a voice to hear on the radio.  I have seen The Prisoner of Zenda.  I think it's pretty decent.  I don't like it as much as others do, though.

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Aloha, Hawaiian Goddess -- You really grind them out, don't you?

 

It's a little easier for me in the winter.

 

I'm quite shamed by my paltry viewings.

 

Say what?!  You have seen every film!

Always Goodbye (1938) - I was rather disappointed, which is rare that I am with early Stanwyck. I blame a rushed and silly storyline.

 

You found it silly?  You didn't like the decision Barbara faced?

Bambi (1942) - though it has been some time, it's probably the most moving Disney experience I remember. The ones told from animals' perspective usually get me. To see the view of the hunted presented so dramatically in 1942, when such practices weren't even questioned, and in a cartoon feature--is remarkable. So many people have told me how traumatic that one scene with the doe was for them.
 

That's a very nice write-up.  And like many great horror films, we don't even see any of the violence.  Love seeing the animals, as well.  Such a lovely film.

 

A Bill of Divorcement (1932) - it is very creaky and stagey, still, seeing Kate debuting with Barrymore as her father is compelling. She came a long way after in terms of her comfort with the camera. It's interesting to see the different ways actors develop.

 

A very good point about seeing John and Katharine together.  And I did find the film to be creaky.  But it was worth seeing.

Bright Leaf (1950) - I was very disappointed. Gary's character isn't very deep to me, just spiteful. I think that Pat and Lauren might have fared better had they switched roles. Jack Carson delivers another stand-out supporting performance.

 

And my response to this film was the opposite.  Pat Neal is so good at being the mean one!  I don't know if I would have bought Lauren in such a role.  And I thought Coop simply got caught up in himself but understood what he lost by film's end.  I liked seeing him being unlikable.  That was a refreshing change for Coop.

Bullfighter and the Lady (1951) - I absolutely adore the respect and live as it is displayed between Gilbert Roland and Katy Jurado. Truly, they are among my most admired screen couples. They both have "stature" indeed.

 

That's a fantastic description of Gilbert and Katy.  It's right on point.  Gilbert is especially great in this film.

The Deep Blue Sea (1955) - Vivien again places herself in the predicament of an aging woman experiencing love and it's awkwardness in her situation. Such revealed insecurities, fears and pride--I'm not sure anyone did it better, even if the material was not the greatest (in the screen version anyway). The poor quality of the print I saw also distracted me.

 

Once again, you are right on target!  I agree, Viv is the best at playing this kind of fragile woman.  It probably hits close to home with her, too.

El Paso (1949) - a wonderful cast (Gail Russell, John Payne & Sterling Hayden) gets lost in a story that drags out far too long. Gail's part is typically too brief and the male characters aren't very deep. The movie felt almost like some if the simpler silent westerns with their stereotypes. I hoped for more.
 

You describe the film perfectly.  It's the stars that make the film worth watching.  Payne is the one who stands out.  I also liked Henry Hull.  Sweet Gail is around to try and sooth everyone.  She soothed me!  Sterling is a bulldozer.

 

Gentle Annie (1944) - on the other hand, this little "B" programmer rose above its limitations and turned out to be very entertaining and sprightly. I love seeing Donna Reed so feisty and Harry Morgan in a larger than usual role at that stage. The biggest surprise was finding a James Craig character I actually liked!

 

You are hitting on all cylinders!  You capture the film exactly!  Harry really does have a big role in this one, which is a pleasant surprise.  I also like James Craig in this one.  Donna is a doll.  And when is Marjorie Main ever "gentle"?!  As you said, this little film plays bigger.

The Hatchet Man (1932) - I thought this Edward G. Robinson movie about Chinese gangs very interesting. Certainly a change of face if not pace (he's still in gangster land).
 

"A Change of face if not pace"!  Very funny!

If I Were King (1938) - very much enjoyed it; I love the subject (Villon) and setting (King Louis XI's reign) and thought Colman superb. I still prefer Barrymore's version slightly, but both are excellent. Best of all are any scenes between Villon and Louis matching wits.

 

I'm very surprised to learn you like a silent version more.  Especially since this film is so witty.

The Joker Is Wild (1957) - Frank is in his element here and captures the highs and lows of a man in a world much like his own off-screen.
 

You got it.  This is the kind of "Frank" that I really go for.

 

Lawrence of Arabia (1962) - Not a movie I can describe my feelings for in just a few short sentences. I'm interested in how it went down with you.
 

It went down well after a slow start.  David Lean almost always wins me over by film's end.

 

Les Miserables (1935) - I prefer this version largely for Laughton's performance. Like Lawrence, it's a timeless tale. Injustice and the unfairness of the "system" are beautifully personalized.
 

Boy, you are razor sharp with your assessments.  "Beautifully personalized."  That's excellent.

 

[ b]Lost Horizon (1937)[/b] - this is an odd movie I like but can't feel very warmly toward. I I admire it and find it unsettling at the same time. Interesting how imperfect man's concept of the ideal is compared to God's.

 

Oh, I love the idea of Shangri-La.  That is, unless it makes people so empty and mindless.

The Naked Maja (1958) - I can't help it but Franciosa really ruins it for me. Ava is ravishing, no doubt.

 

She's so very inviting in this one.  I love how playfully sexy she is.  Ava is truly hard to best with that.  And she's Garbo again!

Of Human Hearts (1938) - the definition of heart wrenching mother love. Who knew Jimmy could be such a Pratt!!

 

He was at least doing good!  Poor Pilgrim!

Slattery's Hurricane (1949) - I suppose it is a bit of a soap opera but I really like this movie. And Veronica turns in her most poignantly touching performances.

 

You're right, Veronica really is touching in this one.  That's unlike her.  What do you like about the film?

Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956) - it took me a while to want to see this movie through but I ended up liking it. Again, a sport I hate makes for such a good setting for a story. I even got over Paul's New Yawk accent. Surprising to see a young Steve McQueen in a bit part.
 

I think Ben Mankiewicz mentioned McQueen in his intro, so I knew to look for him.  He shows up pretty darn quickly.  And then he's gone!  Even as a diehard sports fan, I usually dread watching boxing films.  Yet, I almost always like them.

 

Topaze (1933) - wonderfully sly and risqué. Barrymore and Myrna are delightful together.

 

There you are again as Myrna, Coco!

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Hola, Queen of the Furies 

 

Well hello my DEAR friend. (ha)  Or should I be saying my DEER friend. :D

 

I am so surprised (and yet also pleased) to see that you put that one at the top. Wowsa. Who knew you were so "sweet" on "sweet" :D

 

I still remember seeing that film  for the very first time. I think I was either a very young adult or very old teenager by the time I actually got to see it, and I remember just being a blubbery mess by the time it was all over. ha. It is so beautiful in so many places (not just visually, but in the telling of the story and in the characters too.) I am so glad to hear that you liked it so well. 

 

And then Woo.. look at  you, Mr. "Of Arabia" ha. That is not nearly so much of a surprise. It is awfully hard not to be impressed with LOA. it really is a masterpiece of film making (no matter how cliche that may sound) 

 

a thing for Peter O'Toole?  You?  Who knew?!  

 

Ha.. no. I wouldn't say I have a THING for him.. but I do know "purty" when I see it. ha. But in truth he is almost TOO beautiful to behold. It really does get to be hard to look at him sometimes. (sort of like looking at the sun too long, ha). And then there is his voice. It is perfect for this character.. so nonchalant and yet so purposeful all at the same time. He was quite commanding, and everyone who came under his spell just couldn't help but follow him. Trouble was.. he loved himself (and the pull he had on others) just a little too much. He sort of began to believe his own press and he didn't want anyone's opinion other than his own. He was extremely self-absorbed and extremely self assured.  And it was one of  his  greatest strengths and probably his biggest weakness.. both at the same time.  

 

I'm impressed that you have seen Lawrence of Arabia on the big screen, twice.

 

I saw it once when I was in college. (about 1982-ish) The young man that I dated then took me to see it at a theater that occasionally showed classic films on certain nights of the month. (back before everyone and their dogs had VCR's, ha. so if you wanted to watch an old favorite you either had to catch it on the late-late show or just wait until a theater might be showing them for fun.  

 

And then the second time I saw it was about 6 or 7 years later (very late 80's?) when they did some sort of restoration to the film and re-released it nationwide (I assume it was nationwide) Anyway.. the theater was pretty full and I remember thinking how gorgeous it looked (even compared to that first time I saw it years before) It was great to get to see it that way.  

 

As for my fondness for O'Toole, I can say that I do enjoy him as an actor. But apart from this film..  A Lion in Winter would be the only other one that really stands out the most for me. (and he is decidedly UN-purty in that one as he was lovely  in LOA.. boy..talk about your polar opposites. ha)  

 

I remember you discussing it on "Rambles", I believe.  Since I hadn't seen the film yet, I didn't read what was being written.  I wasn't too enthralled with the picture, either

 

Actually.. it was a different thread altogether. I went looking for it because I wanted to remember what I had said about it all those gazillion years ago. (ok.. really only about 7 years ago.. ha. But golly it was a good long while) I did find the thread.. here is a link to the discussion I had w/ Nightwalker and Movieman, and a few others. As for what I said about it all,  it was pretty much what I remembered.  (if you start at about #110 you can see where i started and then scroll up toward the top, and you'll find most of the conversation if you care to read any of it. I think it goes on from page 6 to page 5 but it is not too very long of a chat) 

 

http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/18792-frank-capra-and-his-films/page-6

 

The biggest issues I had with the story was the whole "Shangri-la" and the spiritualism. I am pretty well-grounded in my personal belief system and while I respect others and their opinions.. I just had a hard time not "rolling my eyes" at all the "guru" stuff. That's probably just me. Others may not agree. I wish I had a better memory for all of the characters. Re-reading my original comments did  help, but I would have to see the film again to be able to comment much further.   

 

I must have screwed up the Abbott & Costello film, because I thought you suggested it to me. 

 

No.. the one I remember talking to you about was the one Mr. Movieman mentioned to you tonight.. The Time of their Lives. I have not heard of the others  you mentioned in your list. I will see if I can find them at the library maybe. 

 

I am going to do my best to try and look in on some of your youtubes but it might not be until next week. Any stand outs you think I should go for first?? 

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It's a little easier for me in the winter.


 

Nothing is easier for me in the winter.

 

Say what?!  You have seen every film!

 

Your lists are showing me otherwise.

You found it silly?  You didn't like the decision Barbara faced?

 

It's a decision I've seen faced several times in pre-codes, I guess.  And I really didn't like how rushed the beginning was.  But Barbara is always worth watching at this stage.

That's a very nice write-up.  And like many great horror films, we don't even see any of the violence.  Love seeing the animals, as well.  Such a lovely film.

 

I'm very surprised it ranked #1 for you.  Seriously?  Better than LoA?

 

And my response to this film was the opposite.  Pat Neal is so good at being the mean one!  I don't know if I would have bought Lauren in such a role.  And I thought Coop simply got caught up in himself but understood what he lost by film's end.  I liked seeing him being unlikable.  That was a refreshing change for Coop.

 

Lauren is pretty mean in Young Man with a Horn, so she can do it.  I appreciate what you say about a change of pace for Cooper but I didn't really get under the skin of the character.  Maybe the script was lacking.

 

That's a fantastic description of Gilbert and Katy.  It's right on point.  Gilbert is especially great in this film.

 

I like what you wrote about the movie.  I just admire the marriage of Katy and Gilbertito.  They understand each other on an individual and cultural level.  This is their world, they understand every nuance of it, of the language of bullfighting and what it means for a man to be one and for a woman to be married to one.  Beautiful.  My hat is off to Boetticher for the sensitivity.  And the two did not get on very smoothly.   I believe Roland's father was a bullfighter and he did it himself in his youth in Mexico, so he took the whole thing very seriously.  Boetticher himself was an amateur bullfighter but with a big ego.

 

Once again, you are right on target!  I agree, Viv is the best at playing this kind of fragile woman.  It probably hits close to home with her, too.

 

I admire her for playing such roles, but I'm afraid they damaged her, reinforced her negative feelings and mental instability. 

 

I like Kenneth More but his character and that situation is just not one I can empathize with.  I've always been more drawn to older, not younger men.


 

You describe the film perfectly.  It's the stars that make the film worth watching.  Payne is the one who stands out.  I also liked Henry Hull.  Sweet Gail is around to try and sooth everyone.  She soothed me!  Sterling is a bulldozer.

 

Ha!  Bulldozer is hilariously true.  I think he probably visualized that and made it his M.O. for playing the character.  Still, I'm glad I watched it.  Do you have Way of a Gaucho?

 

"A Change of face if not pace"!  Very funny!

 

A vastly better film about Asian gangsterland is The Yakuza with Mitchum.  But that's Japan, not Chinatown.

 

It went down well after a slow start.  David Lean almost always wins me over by film's end.

 

Did you feel as Kathy that Lawrence keeps you arms's length as a character?  I can never feel all that sympathetic for him though I do have tremendous admiration.  What's your favorite scene.  I love Alec Guinness' character, too, by the way.  He seems the most modern---like some more westernized Arab leaders today. 

 

Les Miserables (1935) - I prefer this version largely for Laughton's performance. Like Lawrence, it's a timeless tale. Injustice and the unfairness of the "system" are beautifully personalized.
 

Boy, you are razor sharp with your assessments.  "Beautifully personalized."  That's excellent.

 

I think that has to be the secret to an epic, if you can't see the universal in an individual it can be a bore.  I'm talking more about Hugo.  Which do you prefer, storywise---this, or The Hunchback of Notre Dame?

 

Oh, I love the idea of Shangri-La.  That is, unless it makes people so empty and mindless.

 

I think now that is my problem with the picture, not that it's that big an issue.  I just found most of the characters annoying.  We really don't spend that much time with Ronald, either.  I'd like more of him and his feelings and less of the other whiners and complainers.

The scene on the path with the girl who runs away---and what happens to her---was pretty chilling I admit.  Good special effects/make-up.

 

Have you seen The Time Machine?


She's so very inviting in this one.  I love how playfully sexy she is.  Ava is truly hard to best with that.  And she's Garbo again!

 

I wonder if we're the only ones who see the correllation between the careers of those two actresses.  Ava and Spain, what a potent combination, as Frank learned only too well, lol.

Of Human Hearts (1938) - the definition of heart wrenching mother love. Who knew Jimmy could be such a Pratt!!

 

He was at least doing good!  Poor Pilgrim!

 

What about the gloves?  Didn't he make a big deal about having the right gloves when a soldier????  Am I wrong?  I seem to remember being infuriated at him for being so childish.

Slattery's Hurricane (1949) - I suppose it is a bit of a soap opera but I really like this movie. And Veronica turns in her most poignantly touching performances.

 

You're right, Veronica really is touching in this one.  That's unlike her.  What do you like about the film?

 

It's a soap opera, and I love all the actors.  Though Slattery himself is too abrasive and swinish.  I could kill him for how he treats Veronica.  Her short hair makes her look even more vulnerable.  I just feel so bad for her.

I think Ben Mankiewicz mentioned McQueen in his intro, so I knew to look for him.  He shows up pretty darn quickly.  And then he's gone!  Even as a diehard sports fan, I usually dread watching boxing films.  Yet, I almost always like them.

 

Maybe they make for easy, accesible metaphor?  I recommend Cinderella Man for a modern one that's good. 

 

Topaze (1933) - wonderfully sly and risqué. Barrymore and Myrna are delightful together.

 

There you are again as Myrna, Coco!

 

You didn't seem to care for it.  Why?

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Good evening, Queen of the Snow Furies -- Well hello my DEAR friend. (ha)  Or should I be saying my DEER friend. :D

 

Very good!

 

I am so surprised (and yet also pleased) to see that you put that one at the top. Wowsa. Who knew you were so "sweet" on "sweet" :D

 

I do have a thing for animals.

 

I still remember seeing that film  for the very first time. I think I was either a very young adult or very old teenager by the time I actually got to see it, and I remember just being a blubbery mess by the time it was all over. ha. It is so beautiful in so many places (not just visually, but in the telling of the story and in the characters too.) I am so glad to hear that you liked it so well. 

 

I really did like the mixing of the light and the dark.  The sweetness combined with danger makes for a great film.

 

a thing for Peter O'Toole?  You?  Who knew?!  

 

Ha.. no. I wouldn't say I have a THING for him.. but I do know "purty" when I see it. ha. But in truth he is almost TOO beautiful to behold. It really does get to be hard to look at him sometimes. (sort of like looking at the sun too long, ha). And then there is his voice. It is perfect for this character.. so nonchalant and yet so purposeful all at the same time. He was quite commanding, and everyone who came under his spell just couldn't help but follow him. Trouble was.. he loved himself (and the pull he had on others) just a little too much. He sort of began to believe his own press and he didn't want anyone's opinion other than his own. He was extremely self-absorbed and extremely self assured.  And it was one of  his  greatest strengths and probably his biggest weakness.. both at the same time.  

 

Nicely said.  I always think it takes a self-assured, arrogant kind of person to do what Lawrence does.  But then if they succeed, they are in danger of letting that arrogance consume them.  That's certainly what happens to Lawrence.

 

I saw it once when I was in college. (about 1982-ish) The young man that I dated then took me to see it at a theater that occasionally showed classic films on certain nights of the month. (back before everyone and their dogs had VCR's, ha. so if you wanted to watch an old favorite you either had to catch it on the late-late show or just wait until a theater might be showing them for fun.  

 

You dated a young man?  You?! :P

 

As for my fondness for O'Toole, I can say that I do enjoy him as an actor. But apart from this film..  A Lion in Winter would be the only other one that really stands out the most for me. (and he is decidedly UN-purty in that one as he was lovely  in LOA.. boy..talk about your polar opposites. ha)  

 

This was only the second film of his that I have seen.  The other being How to Steal a Million.  I have liked him in both.

 

Actually.. it was a different thread altogether. I went looking for it because I wanted to remember what I had said about it all those gazillion years ago. (ok.. really only about 7 years ago.. ha. But golly it was a good long while) I did find the thread.. here is a link to the discussion I had w/ Nightwalker and Movieman, and a few others. As for what I said about it all,  it was pretty much what I remembered.  (if you start at about #110 you can see where i started and then scroll up toward the top, and you'll find most of the conversation if you care to read any of it. I think it goes on from page 6 to page 5 but it is not too very long of a chat) 

 

I shall read it now!

 

Okay, I read it.  I pretty much agreed with your assessment of the film.  I'm actually shocked we'd agree on such a film. :D

 

The biggest issues I had with the story was the whole "Shangri-la" and the spiritualism. I am pretty well-grounded in my personal belief system and while I respect others and their opinions.. I just had a hard time not "rolling my eyes" at all the "guru" stuff. That's probably just me. Others may not agree. I wish I had a better memory for all of the characters. Re-reading my original comments did  help, but I would have to see the film again to be able to comment much further.

 

I'm for a utopian ideal but I'm not into it making one mindless and emotionless.  What fun is that?  And I don't go for following any kind of figure.  But, like you, I respect the choice to do so.

 

No.. the one I remember talking to you about was the one Mr. Movieman mentioned to you tonight.. The Time of their Lives. I have not heard of the others  you mentioned in your list. I will see if I can find them at the library maybe. 

 

You would like The Wistful Widow of Wagon Gap.  I think your daughter may like it, too.

 

I am going to do my best to try and look in on some of your youtubes but it might not be until next week. Any stand outs you think I should go for first??

 

I can't say that any of the YouTube movies would be your kind of films.  Always Goodbye is a "mother" pic that you would at least find stimulating from an emotional and intellectual point of view.  That's about it.

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Bonjour, Fordy Guns -- I really enjoyed your answers.  You exhibited a great deal of life.  I love it!

 

Nothing is easier for me in the winter.

 

Where you are it should be!

 

Your lists are showing me otherwise.

 

I blame Sweet T!

It's a decision I've seen faced several times in pre-codes, I guess.  And I really didn't like how rushed the beginning was.  But Barbara is always worth watching at this stage.

 

I'm not sure I have seen the motherly decision in Always Goodbye before.  I'd have to think about it.

 

I'm very surprised it ranked #1 for you.  Seriously?  Better than LoA?

 

I'm usually not a huge fan of epics and I also thought Lawrence of Arabia kept me at arm's length with the emotion.  It's the same feeling I had with The Bridge on the River Kwai.  I was more emotionally engaged with Bambi.

 

Lauren is pretty mean in Young Man with a Horn, so she can do it.

 

That's one I haven't seen yet.  It makes me want to see it!

 

I appreciate what you say about a change of pace for Cooper but I didn't really get under the skin of the character.  Maybe the script was lacking.

 

I do agree, Coop didn't go too deep with his single-minded "Brant Royle".  He was one-dimensional.  Still, I did enjoy his fate and the ending.  So very atypical for Coop.  That alone makes the film a plus for me.  It's Pat Neal!  She messes him up!

 

I like what you wrote about the movie.  I just admire the marriage of Katy and Gilbertito.  They understand each other on an individual and cultural level.  This is their world, they understand every nuance of it, of the language of bullfighting and what it means for a man to be one and for a woman to be married to one.  Beautiful.

 

That's wonderfully expressed.  It is true, they have a full understanding of their roles in their marriage and culture and how each is to respond to the other.

 

My hat is off to Boetticher for the sensitivity.

 

Excellent point.  It's the most sensitive of his films that I have seen.

 

And the two did not get on very smoothly.   I believe Roland's father was a bullfighter and he did it himself in his youth in Mexico, so he took the whole thing very seriously.  Boetticher himself was an amateur bullfighter but with a big ego.

 

Fascinating!

 

I admire her for playing such roles, but I'm afraid they damaged her, reinforced her negative feelings and mental instability. 

 

That's brilliant analysis of your Vivling.  I believe there's a lot of truth to what you say, too.

 

I like Kenneth More but his character and that situation is just not one I can empathize with.  I've always been more drawn to older, not younger men.

 

But us younger guys are so loving!  I didn't go for Freddie (Kenneth More), but I can see how Hester (Vivien Leigh) and women would.  He was full of life and she felt her own life was dead.  It's exciting to get close to the flame.  I liked Miller (Eric Portman) the very most.

 

Ha!  Bulldozer is hilariously true.  I think he probably visualized that and made it his M.O. for playing the character.  Still, I'm glad I watched it.

 

:D  I think Sterling was naturally a bulldozer. :)  And I'm always happy to watch Gail Russell!

 

Do you have Way of a Gaucho?

 

I actually got it for Christmas.  I will watch it in the next group.  I have high expectations for it because it's Jacques Tourneur.

 

A vastly better film about Asian gangsterland is The Yakuza with Mitchum.  But that's Japan, not Chinatown.

 

I still have to watch it!  And I got that Mitchum box set back in 2007.  Pathetic!

 

Did you feel as Kathy that Lawrence keeps you arms's length as a character?

 

Yes, completely.  I feel the film mirrors him, too.  I was much crazier about Omar Sharif because he was playing a rascal who actually grew during the story.

 

I can never feel all that sympathetic for him though I do have tremendous admiration.

 

I'd say my feelings are similar.  I like how he feels like a pawn by film's end.  I liked that a lot.

 

What's your favorite scene.

 

Hmmmmm, that's a tough question.  Probably the love scene. :P  I really liked all of the interactions between Lawrence and Sherif Ali (Omar Sharif).  I liked the scene when Lawrence went back in the desert to get the young man (saves life) and then the scene where he must kill the same man (takes life).  Very God-like.

 

I love Alec Guinness' character, too, by the way.  He seems the most modern---like some more westernized Arab leaders today. 

 

He does seem very modern.  Things haven't changed too much with all the table discussions with leaders.  It's all one big game for many of these men.  That's still going on today.  I always love David Lean's commentary on war.

 

I think that has to be the secret to an epic, if you can't see the universal in an individual it can be a bore.  I'm talking more about Hugo.  Which do you prefer, storywise---this, or The Hunchback of Notre Dame?

 

You are asking some tough questions!  I'd go with Hunchback.  I like the characters more.  Les Miserables is more personal, though.  Both films do make a commentary on society and its laws.  I like that.

 

I think now that is my problem with the picture, not that it's that big an issue.  I just found most of the characters annoying.  We really don't spend that much time with Ronald, either.  I'd like more of him and his feelings and less of the other whiners and complainers. The scene on the path with the girl who runs away---and what happens to her---was pretty chilling I admit.  Good special effects/make-up.

 

Yes, I really like the scenes with Margo.  She is willing to follow her love and it ends up killing her.  This is very similar to She, which is a film I like much better than Lost Horizon.

 

Have you seen The Time Machine?

 

I haven't.  I'm hoping to get the TCM collection with it.  I want to try and get it for around ten bucks.

 

I wonder if we're the only ones who see the correllation between the careers of those two actresses.

 

I would say yes!  I don't believe many people take Ava too seriously because she didn't have an iconic role or film.

 

Ava and Spain, what a potent combination, as Frank learned only too well, lol.

 

I heard.  She was very much like "Maxine Faulk".  Not good.

 

What about the gloves?  Didn't he make a big deal about having the right gloves when a soldier????  Am I wrong?  I seem to remember being infuriated at him for being so childish.

 

Oh, wow!  That's right!  I completely forgot about that!  That was absolutely terrible!  Jason (James Stewart) cared more about his fancy gloves than he did about anything, at that moment.  Talk about shallow and selfish.  Mary (Beulah Bondi) had to sell Pilgrim!  Unforgivable!

It's a soap opera, and I love all the actors.  Though Slattery himself is too abrasive and swinish.  I could kill him for how he treats Veronica.  Her short hair makes her look even more vulnerable.  I just feel so bad for her.

 

Poor Veronica!  She could give Viv a run for her money in reality.  I really did like seeing Veronica play such a character as she does in Slattery's Hurricane.  It was quite a switch.  I just couldn't get into the story or Richard Widmark's character.  Swinish! :D

 

Maybe they make for easy, accesible metaphor?  I recommend Cinderella Man for a modern one that's good. 

 

I know darn well why you would suggest that one!  That's your beefcake!

 

You didn't seem to care for it.  Why?

 

I kept wanting more from Topaze, the film.  It seemed too gentle for me.  The naivete kind of wore on me, after a while.  I'm surprised that you like it since you usually do not like men such as Topaze (John Barrymore).  He's similar to Bertram Potts (Gary Cooper) in Ball of Fire.

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