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The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

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Howdy Grey Dude. Sorry it's taken me a few days to answer.. too many irons in my fire lately. :)

 

Queen of the Snow Furies 

 

Ha.. not this winter.. we've gotten off easy (though we did have a pretty fair amount of snow a couple of weekends ago. It HAS been miserably cold off and on since October (single digits, etc) but not much of the white stuff for ole KC this year (at least compared to all that you folks out east have gotten) Today it is sunny and almost 70.. yippee!

 

I really did like the mixing of the light and the dark.  The sweetness combined with danger makes for a great film

 

It is such an innocent film if taken on the surface, but it does show how fragile the "balance" of nature can be.

 

I always think it takes a self-assured, arrogant kind of person to do what Lawrence does.  But then if they succeed, they are in danger of letting that arrogance consume them.  That's certainly what happens to Lawrence.

 

That is exactly the right way to say it. He had to have a level of that "arrogance" but he did let it overtake him and it more or less ruined him, even if on the surface much of what he did (or tried to do) was successful (at least early on) He wasn't a strong enough person (internally) to be a good leader and motivator with any lasting influence.. he ended up just a "rock star".

 

You dated a young man?  You? 

 

Yes.. back when I was young too.. ha. (you know. Dinosaur days. We stopped for Brontosaurus burgers like the Flintstones did at the end of their show.. ha. (silly man) 

 

This was only the second film of his that I have seen.  The other being How to Steal a Million.  I have liked him in both.

 

I highly recommend The Lion in Winter (ha.. and when/if you see it.. you will be SO surprised that I told you that.. it is not my "typical" sort of film. I actually saw it the first time in college in a Film Literature class I took (ha.. about the same age as when I was dating the "young man" in fact, now that I think about it) I can't say there is ANYONE likeable in the whole entire movie.. and yet you end up loving Katherine Hepburn AND Peter O'Toole in this film.. if only because they are so fun to watch rip each other to shreds. There's a lot of intrigue too.. between all the sons and the two parents. Everyone wants to get even, or get over.. or kill somebody. (think of it as Mourning Becomes Electra.. the medieval years) ha. Only nobody dies.. at least not that I can remember.  :D  

 

You would like The Wistful Widow of Wagon Gap.  I think your daughter may like it, too.

 

I will try to find it. We love Marjorie. 

 

Always Goodbye is a "mother" pic that you would at least find stimulating from an emotional and intellectual point of view.

 

That one looks like a tear-jerker.. I will have to stock up on my Kleenex. :) 

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Here's the latest crop of films that I have watched:

 

Arrowhead (1953)

Bachelor Mother (1939)

Break of Hearts (1935)

Cain and Mabel (1936)

City That Never Sleeps (1953)

Dead Men Tell (1941)

Dear Brigitte (1965)

A Double Life (1947)

A Free Soul (1931)

Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)

Golden Boy (1939)

Gone to Earth (1950)

The Gorgeous Hussy (1936)

Hatter's Castle (1942)

The Hoodlum (1951)

If Winter Comes (1947)

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)

Killers of Kilimanjaro (1959)

Kismet (1944)

Kitty Foyle (1940)

Ladies of Leisure (1930)

The Lady from Cheyenne (1941)

Lady with a Past (1932)

The Late George Apley (1947)

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943)

Love on the Run (1936)

Mad Dog Coll (1961)

One Sunday Afternoon (1933)

On the Double (1961)

Portrait in Black (1960)

Raffles (1930)

The Redhead from Wyoming (1953)

Roxie Hart (1942)

Ruthless (1948)

Siege at Red River (1954)

The Sleeping Tiger (1954)

The Southerner (1945)

The Story of Temple Drake (1933)

Take a Letter, Darling (1942)

Tea and Sympathy (1956)

A Terrible Beauty (1960)

The Thief (1952)

Till the Clouds Roll By (1946)

Top Gun (1955)

Way of a Gaucho (1952)

 

Any thoughts from anyone?  I'd love to hear them.

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Here's the latest crop of films that I have watched:

 

Arrowhead (1953)

Bachelor Mother (1939)

Break of Hearts (1935)

Cain and Mabel (1936)

City That Never Sleeps (1953)

Dead Men Tell (1941)

Dear Brigitte (1965)

A Double Life (1947)

A Free Soul (1931)

Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)

Golden Boy (1939)

Gone to Earth (1950)

The Gorgeous Hussy (1936)

Hatter's Castle (1942)

The Hoodlum (1951)

If Winter Comes (1947)

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)

Killers of Kilimanjaro (1959)

Kismet (1944)

Kitty Foyle (1940)

Ladies of Leisure (1930)

The Lady from Cheyenne (1941)

Lady with a Past (1932)

The Late George Apley (1947)

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943)

Love on the Run (1936)

Mad Dog Coll (1961)

One Sunday Afternoon (1933)

On the Double (1961)

Portrait in Black (1960)

Raffles (1930)

The Redhead from Wyoming (1953)

Roxie Hart (1942)

Ruthless (1948)

Siege at Red River (1954)

The Sleeping Tiger (1954)

The Southerner (1945)

The Story of Temple Drake (1933)

Take a Letter, Darling (1942)

Tea and Sympathy (1956)

A Terrible Beauty (1960)

The Thief (1952)

Till the Clouds Roll By (1946)

Top Gun (1955)

Way of a Gaucho (1952)

 

Any thoughts from anyone?  I'd love to hear them.

 

I like Take a Letter, Darling.  It was the first time I thought Fred MacMurray was attractive, lol.

A Terrible Beauty and Ruthless sound interesting.  I've not seen either, or quite a few on your list for that matter. 

I've often railed on Kitty Foyle as one of my least favorite Ginger characters.  My sympathies were entirely with her fiance's stuck up family!  She deserved the annoying doctor.

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Hello there Grey Dude.. 


 


Here's the latest crop of films that I have watched:


 


Not too many I can comment on, but I have seen a few: 


 


Bachelor Mother (1939)


 


I like it well enough.. but can't call it a favorite or anything. I think I prefer the remake w/ Debbie Reynolds (Bundle of Joy) but not by much, maybe. They are both good enough for a smile.. but neither are what I would call a "stand out" overall. 


 


Dear Brigitte (1965)


Saw it way.. way.. WAY back when I was a teenager. (yes.. they DID have TV way back then) May I just say.. BAH!   :rolleyes:  :D


 


The Gorgeous Hussy (1936)


I have seen parts of this film, (a couple of times) but I always came in on it way too late to really get a good chance to see it. I would like to see it all the way through sometime. 


 


Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)


Always fun for a smile.. ha. (I doubt they MEANT for it to be thought of that way, back in the day, though.. ha) We (the QT and I) love the ending with that poor guy running down the street shouting "You're next" ha. (anytime we see someone we think MIGHT be a "pod-person" in real life.. ha.. we'll look at each other and say.. "They're here already!! You're next!") ha. Silly us. :D


 


Kitty Foyle (1940)


 


Haven't seen it in a very long time but I remember it had a bit of "soap opera" feel to it.. not necessarily a BAD thing.. ha.. if taken in small doses now and then,  but may not have been your cup of tea altogether. (but I confesss.. I would need to see it again to be sure of what I am saying) 


 


The Story of Temple Drake (1933)


 


I saw this once a few years ago and I remember it being a very hard to watch sort of tale.. (but I mean that in a good way) I do recall it is very intense in places, but I would have to see it again to be able to say much more. If you like this one.. you might also enjoy another that I came across on youtube (by total accident) I have to say the subject matter is not ordinarily to my liking, but I thought that the way the story is told is so creative and different.. it really kept me thinking for days after I saw it:


 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9ZY_G53Xc8 


 


Top Gun (1955)


I have never seen this.. but oh wait.. yes I have. But hey.. this movie was made in 1955??? Ha.. I didn't think Tom Cruise and Meg Ryan were that old.. Hahahahahahahaha. (KIDDING!!) :D


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zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz  and z

 

:P 

 

(wake me up if he ever comes back in here to tell us how he rated them) 

 

:D

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YO! Grey Dude.. if you ever wake up from your nap.. (oh wait.. I am the one who fell asleep waiting for you to post.. ha, never mind) Let me start over.. if you ever come out of the SHADOWS... ha. I wanted to pop in here and tell you that I just re-watched Green Dolphin Street and I remembered that you had this one in a batch of your movies a while back.  

 

16. Green Dolphin Street (1947)

 

When you originally posted on it, I think I mentioned that I had seen it but did not recall much beyond the big earthquake scene. I am glad to say I got a chance to rewatch it again tonight (after all these years) 

 

Wowsa.. the earthquake was every bit as "cool" as I recall (way cool and very well done) And I have to say there were some other really amazing scenes too. (like poor Donna Reed climbing up that cliff with the tide moving in.. woo)

 

But one thing that I have to say left me pretty flat (overall) was the whole Marianne-William-love-THING ha. (too convoluted) :D

 

But I did enjoy Van Heflin and the part he played in it all. And I really.. oh me... I REALLY was blown away by Edmond Gwenn. (spoiler alert) I totally love him anyway.. but that bit where he is with his wife and she is dying, and he tells her that he knew her big secret all along.. and the exact moment she began to love him.. AGH!! That was something. I think that was about as fine a piece of acting on his part I think I have ever seen.. very moving. (for both of them really.. but me oh my.. that was a standout moment for him to be sure) 

 

Ok.. back to my siesta now.. I will wait (and wait.. forever.. ha) for  you to post on your latest list, I guess, but meanwhile, I just had to pop in a drop a line or two about GDS.. very glad to have caught it again this evening after all these years. 

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Howdy, Quiet Gal!

 

I'm impressed by your watching "Green Dolphin Street"! I know I entered my viewing a bit wary. I was surprised to find myself really liking it.

 

I loved the convoluted love stories! Everyone seemed to be in love with someone who didn't love them back. I live on Green Dolphin Street!

 

Loved Van Heflin in this one. Edmund was good, too.

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Well HELLO there Grey Dude.. It's about TIME you stepped out of the shadows for a change. I was beginning to worry that you and Belle went dancing off into the mist or something. :D

I'm impressed by your watching "Green Dolphin Street"! I know I entered my viewing a bit wary. I was surprised to find myself really liking it. 
 

I was really glad to have caught it again. I had seen part of it a long while back and always wanted to catch it to see all the way through. Am glad I was finally able. 

I loved the convoluted love stories! Everyone seemed to be in love with someone who didn't love them back. 

 

Ha.. I am too practical maybe to go for the "convoluted" stuff.. I especially had to roll my eyes at the drunken letter writing mistake.. oh bruddah.. ha. But overall.. you are right. Everyone more or less had a lot to learn about love.. and WHO they loved. It was quite the tangled mess. 

 

I live on Green Dolphin Street!

 

Ha.. Better there than on that island.. with all those earthquakes! :D

Loved Van Heflin in this one. Edmund was good, too. 

 

Yep.. neither one were the main star.. but they really stood out for me.

 

Come back at outta those shadows more often.. you have a LOT of movies listed here that I waiting to hear all about. :) 

 

Don't MAKE me go get my hatpin. :D:P

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Hey there Frank and my fellow Frank torturers :)

 

One word:

 

Ketchup!

 

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Yep! That's me!

 

Frank has watched about 10,000 movies it seems and I haven't commented on a good many of them, even the ones I recommended. I have been going through his old lists and now I am going to try and "catch up" on as many as I can.

 

This is going to take a while so any time he puts out a new list I will just stop and concentrate on that one. Then start again when there is another opening.

 

I have gone some seventy pages back in this thread and I might eventually go even further back ( I have to find those Fred and Ginger comments). So this is the first in a series of "ketchup" posts.  

 

List 9/6/13

 

4. The Kentuckian -- What a wonderful surprise this film was. I loved the message of the film. I really liked the two women in the film, Dianne Foster and Diana Lynn. How often does a film present two rival women in a positive light? I had no idea Burt Lancaster was the director of this film until the credits rolled.

 

I really liked this film too. I have said in the past that I haven't cared that much for Burt Lancaster but I going to stop saying that now. I think it all comes from when I was a kid watching the late movie. (Back then, at least where I lived, you only had two choices at that hour. The late movie or Carson and I picked the movie usually.) I would see him in films like The Rose Tattoo and Come Back, Little Sheba. Those films are a lot to digest for a ten year old boy who has the TV on while he is playing army by himself. Yet I would see things on the surface of these films that made lasting impressions as I later became a serious film buff. My  impression of Burt suffered from this.

 

Now I see him in films like The Killers and feel like I'm really just discovering him as an actor. This is one of those films that has really changed my mind about him. I liked the story, the feel of the film. It's a great historical film. I also really liked Big Eli. I was with his character the whole way here.

 

8. The Window -- This is one of the most suspenseful films I have seen of late. The tension just builds and builds. It's almost like a darker version of "*Home Alone*." I can't believe Ruth Roman is a baddie! 

 

I commented on this one recently in the noir thread. I agree it is suspenseful. I actually like Ruth best when she's bad.

 

 

10. Mystery of the Wax Museum -- I loved the creepiness of the film along with the relationship between Florence (Glenda Farrell) and Jim (Frank McHugh). Many 30s horror films attempt to combine the serious with the silly and they usually fall short with me. This one does it right. Lionel Atwill is tremendous, as always. I thought the big reveal was done well.

 

Oh this is a favorite of mine. I agree with you about the creepiness. The film looks wonderfully weird using the two strip Technicolor.  Defintely a Warners horror film with Farrell and McHugh rolling out the dialog at a quick clip. The early fire scene was wonderfully done and the way the wax figures succumb to the flames has always stayed in my memory. Lionel Atwill is great.

 

13. Kind Hearts and Coronets -- What's crazy about this one is that I had no idea Alec Guinness played all the "D'Ascoynes"! Remarkable! The style of comedy really isn't my style. It's very dry and completely understated; terribly "British." But I ended up liking the picture because of its irony and the brilliant performance of Dennis Price. I also liked Valerie Hobson and Joan Greenwood, who play great contrasts in Woman. Joan is always so good as the ****

 

(Note these older posts have been oddly censored and I have no idea why!)

 

You also saw The Ladykillers I see, It has been a long time since I have seen these films but count me as a big fan of the Ealing output. I actually really love the British humour.

 

19. Comin' Round the Mountain -- A pretty darn good "Abbott & Costello" flick. I laughed quite a few times during this one. The entire backwoods set-up and the mixed up marriage stuff was hilarious. Margaret Hamilton has a good role and Glenn Strange is really funny as "Devil Dan." Dorothy Shay is lovely, too.

 

I'm really glad that you are viewing all the Abbott & Costello films. I am having a hard time remembering this one but I have seen them all. The Universal Box Set is a treasure and I have all there films on DVD. Lou Costello to me is just one of the most naturally funny performers I have ever seen. He just makes me laugh everytime.

 

20. Charlie Chan in Egypt -- One of my very favorite settings in film is the Middle East. I just love the sand, temples, mummies, catacombs, white clothes, Arabic garb and all of that. Now combine this setting with a mystery and you've got a film I'm probably going to like. And I liked this one.

 

So you have started on the Chan films here, with "Paris", "London", "Egypt" and "Shanghai" and others. I am probably going to make a separate post for just these Chan films. I am with you on the Middle East settings and for all the reasons you say. This is a favorite of mine as well.    

 

 25. It Happened in Hollywood -- I'd say this is the sweetest of the films in this group. You'd never know Sam Fuller was one of the screenwriters. The story is about Tim Bart (Richard Dix), a former silent film cowboy hero whose time has passed him by due to the advent of sound and the gangster pic. Dix shines as the earnest cowboy actor who doesn't want to let his young fans down.

 

I really like this film. I like the Hollywood story and the glimpse we get inside that era. Definitely a sweet film with the angle of trying to please the young fan at the end. Dix was good here in a role that must have struck close to home. The party with the stand-ins was certainly unique.

 

29. The Purchase Price -- This is almost like the rural version of Man's Castle. It's a rough one for the lady, who is played by Barbara Stanwyck, of all people. The film is very simple but with harsh moments. I pretty much liked it.

 

Stanwyck makes this film work for me. Brent is fine but Stanwyck keeps it interesting. In fact I thought the ending was rather abrupt. I was hoping they would seek some retribution for all they had endured.

 

31. Between Two Worlds -- A very solid otherwordly picture. I liked the cast, quite a bit. Edmund Gwenn was superb. Sydney Greenstreet is also very good. I liked Mrs. Midget's (Sara Allgood) character arc the best. I wasn't into the primary love story as much, however. I liked the message with them, though.

 

I love the idea of this film. I agree about the cast. The earlier version called Outward Bound seems to me even more mysterious perhaps because it is such an early sound film. This one brings the war into it. I'm not sure which one I prefer.

 

41.Madame Curie -- I'm not crazy about bio-pics, so this one was pretty much doomed from the start. What I did like in this film is how Pierre and Marie met and how they fell in love. After that, the film becomes rather predictable and uninteresting to me.

 

I can understand your feelings on this one. I liked it pretty well because it was pretty much what I was expecting. The first part is good. Garson works herself easily into these kind of stories and as the picture progresses and we get into the scientific process, I liked the film's earnest portrayal of it all.

 

45. If You Could Only Cook -- This is another film I wanted to like but it just didn't win me over. I thought Jean Arthur was cute but Herbert Marshall wasn't doing it for me. Leo Carrillo was really good, though. I found the overall story to be on the bland side.

 

I think I may have liked this one more than you but not by much. Jean Arthur is one of my favorite actresses and I like Marshall too but this just felt very routine throughout. Bland is about right.

 

50. They Made Me a Criminal -- I started watching this film without any idea about it. What am I speaking of? The film is a remake of *The Life of Jimmy Dolan*. Needless to say, the two films just don't compare. Maybe it's because of the presence of "The Dead End Kids."

 

The Life of Jimmy Dolan is a better picture. I also think you are right on about the presence of "The Dead End Kids" as well. Despite Garfield, Sheridan, Rains and Robson this is basically a "Dead End Kids" film and you really have to take it that way. A lot of their Warners films were remakes of earlier pictures and in the process of being remade they become vehicles for the gang.

 

I like "The Dead End Kids" and this is actually one of their better Warners films. Having been fans of the gang through their various incarnations which eventually led to low budget slapstick, it is interesting to see them in these early films going up against the likes of Cagney and Garfield. Also they are remaking some pre code films and even though the remakes have their dark moments they really can't compare to the darker originals. You might contrast Mayor of Hell and Hell's Kitchen for another example. (Maybe you already have)

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(Note these older posts have been oddly censored and I have know idea why!)

 

These older posts are being attacked by the auto censor that was installed at the latest upgrade April 2014 (which is still in effect now). It automatically applies its database of censored words to the archives. If the next upgrade, for instance, does not have an auto censor, the archives ("older posts") will no longer show any censored words.

 

==

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Thanks for that information Laffite.

 

I was wondering about that.

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Molo catching up. Part 2

 

List 10/13/13

 

22. Taxi! -- Yet another James Cagney and Loretta Young film. This one plays fast and loose. Cagney is amped up and highly volatile. He's a house on fire. Loretta plays his flame, a gal who starts off by standing up to him. What in the world is the film about? It's a revenge flick that takes place in the world of competing taxi companies. I thought it was pretty decent.

 

This is a good Warners style yarn. I liked the taxi war theme and I was mad at the start with the incident involving Guy Kibbee's Pop character. You are right about Cagney and it works well in the film. I liked Loretta Young as well. These early Young performances are some of my favorites.

 

24. Quicksand -- Money! If I could only get some money! That's what we're dealing with in this Mickey Rooney film noir. One misstep leads to another leads to another... The film is mostly entertaining. I think most people can identify with Rooney in this one, particularly young guys. What I didn't like is that the film has a "PSA" feel to it, especially towards the end. Still, it's highly watchable. I really liked the women in the picture: Jeanne Cagney and Barbara Bates. You also get Peter Lorre, in a small role.

 

I don't remember this one too well but I remember liking Rooney in it. I think you are right about being able to identify with his character. This was also my introduction to Jeanne Cagney. Mixing her in with Rooney and Lorre made for a surprisingly good noir. I don't remember the PSA feel to. I would have to check this out again.

 

 

List 11/12/13

 

1. Nothing But the Truth (1941) -- I was quite taken by this Bob Hope comedy. I don't always find myself laughing out loud with classic comedies, but this is one that had me doing just that. The comedy stems from Hope's 24-hour bet with Edward Arnold, Leif Erickson, and Glenn Anders that he wouldn't tell a lie. Hope is ultimately pressured into speaking awful truths in front of others. It's pretty darn funny. I really like the pairing of Hope and Paulette Goddard. 

 

Well I'm a huge Hope fan and he and Goddard paired up for three really good comedies. There are a lot of fun moments here. Hope was at the top of his game during this era.

 

2. Talk About a Stranger (1952) -- This was the biggest surprise of the group for me. It's a rather unique film noir/horror picture. What makes the film different than most is that it's from the point of view of a child. The only film I have seen that is similar is *The Window*. But where the two films depart is in what the boy sees or believes. There is a lot of heart and sweetness to be found in the film, and the horror elements are heightened by the cinematography of John Alton. There is also a hidden message in the film that is quite interesting. I don't know if Jackie has seen this one or not, but I believe she'd love it. I'm pretty sure Quiet Gal would really like it, too. It's too bad it's not on DVD or YouTube.

 

This film is coming up soon as part of the "Summer of Darkness" schedule. So people will get another chance to check it out. I saw this ages ago and it has always stuck with me. Billy Gray is a good child actor, particularly when doing comedy, but here he is practically unsettling and very intense with his suspicions of a new neighbor. 

 

You are right about the cinematography. There is wonderful and foreboding imagery throughout the film. I think that was most memorable for me. This is one of Dore Schary's lesser known "message pictures" that Mayer used to complain about when the two were battling at MGM.

 

6. Lady for a Day (1933) -- This is yet another film that took me by surprise. I now feel this is an under-appreciated Frank Capra film. I'd say this was the sweetest of the films that I watched. I've never seen Warren William playing such a swell guy. And this was definitely his film. May Robson was also quite good as "Apple Annie." And all the mugs and dames in the film really added to the feel of the film.

 

This is a fun one to watch.  I agree with everything you say here. Wonderful characters populate this sweet film. I particularly like Nat Pendleton, but really so many fine character actors get a chance to shine in this. It's a fairy tale.

 

12. Black Legion (1937) -- A "ripped-from-the-headlines" film from the 30s that packs some punch. It's also rather prescient. The story is about a hate group that threatens and attacks people they don't view as "real Americans" for taking jobs away from the "real Americans." The film does an excellent job of showing how fear and hatred create a paranoia with those who are easily manipulated. "They are out go get you." It also wisely shows the lucrative side of organizing and preaching this fear and hate. Humphrey Bogart is our lead. It's not a Bogie you'd ever expect.

 

Definitely an interesting role for Bogart and he really is remarkable here. A family man and working guy we see his disappointments and frustrations turned into something much darker. He loses himself. He loses control. He's a pawn for the agenda of others and Bogart really doesn't hold back with his performance.

 

15. It All Came True (1940) -- This is Bogie? Really? What a charming little film this is. It's rather similar to *Lady for a Day* but it's also a lot like *The Life of Jimmy Dolan,* *Hide-Out,* *You Can't Take It with You*, and *The Ladykillers*. The set-up: Bogie, on the lam from cops, blackmails a young underling of his into hiding him at his mother's boarding house. The inhabitants of this boarding house are unaware of Bogie's being a notorious nightclub owner/gangster. I must say, the combination of the gangster and comedy genres is usually quite good with me. The cast is superb. You not only get Bogie, but there's also Ann Sheridan. The broth is composed of Felix Bressart, Una O'Connor, Zasu Pitts, Jessie Busley, John Litel, and Grant Mitchell. This was a Jackie recommendation, and I know Quiet Gal would actually like this "tomato" picture.

 

"Charming" is a good word to describe this one. We get a different Bogart here. I loved the  boarding house and all the characters in it. I like Sheridan and Bogart together as well. It's really fun to watch Bogart in this. He is uncertain of the whole set up at first, and then he becomes sort of bemused by it all. Staring back at the stuffed live animals that are staring at him in his room, scaring suspicious ZaSu Pitts to the point of hysterics, it's all good fun and one of his more unique films, particularly for his early career.

 

19. *Keeper of the Flame (1942)* -- I certainly wasn't prepared for this one. I had no idea Kate and Spence made such a dark and mysterious film as this. It's awfully intriguing. It has the feel of *Citizen Kane*, actually. I couldn't believe it. The film is about the death of an industrialist, a man who stood for "Americana." Or did he? Spence plays a journalist who is looking to write the story of this great man. Kate plays the great man's widow. What will Spence uncover? Of the Kate & Spence pictures I have seen, this one ranks third, behind *Without Love* and *Desk Set*. I liked it.  
 

I was wondering what you would think of this one. It's certainly different than any other Tracy/Hepburn film. It has been too long since I have seen it. I remember Spencer pursuing the story and being fascinated by the way Kate handles it all.

 

26. *Hold That Ghost (1941)* -- Bud and Lou are stranded at a "haunted house" with others? That sounds great to me! But the film just didn't match my expectations. It's good, but I wanted it to be better. The highlight of the film is Joan Davis, who is terrific. She has a dance sequence with Lou that is genius. She's also good with the candle bit. On the flip side, I thought the film was really dragged down by the book-ending of Ted Lewis. That was draining.

 

I wanted this one to be better too. It's a great premise but they seem to run out of good ideas somewhere along the way. I still enjoyed it for the most part though. When I discovered Joan Davis I didn't know what to make of her at first but then I started to warm up and now she is a favorite of mine. She is good in support but a few of her starring vehicles such as Kansas City Kitty and Beautiful But Broke are pretty darn funny.

 

In Hold That Ghost she is very funny. She may have been a little too funny for Lou who I think felt she got more laughs than he cared for in an A&C picture. She never worked with them again.

 

Also the Andrews Sisters had appeared in the first two A&C films and they were originally not in this picture. It seems Universal did some testing and felt that the audience expected to see them so they were brought in with Ted Lewis to film the two scenes that bookend the film. I like the Andrews Sisters, especially when they are actually involved in the stories of the film in which they appear, but they didn't add much to this film.

 

27. Merton of the Movies (1947) -- The primary reason I watched this film was for Gloria Grahame. To my great surprise, I ended up liking it for Red Skelton and Virginia O'Brien. They are both wonderful. The film is very sweet. And there is some funny moments, thanks to Red and his pratfalls. Gloria? She's a treat, too.

 

You really surprised me here! I wasn't sure you would care for this one at all. I'm so glad you liked it. I like Skelton but sometimes he can be a bit much. In this he is toned down just enough and is character is really likable and funny. I can never seem to get enough of O'Brien and in this film she is finally given a lead role. You are right they are both wonderful.

 

Generally O'Brien sings and she is great with the deadpan expression and novelty songs, yet in this film she doesn't sing a note. Having worked herself up to this level and doing so well in this film, I have never figured out exactly why her career basically ended after this picture.

 

Gloria was pretty funny in this. I liked the scene where she tries to get Red drunk. I wish she got to do more comedy but it probably would have changed the course of her career.
 

30. Private Lives (1931) -- Is this the 30s version of *Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?* ? It really had that feel to me. Of course, it's nowhere near as harsh as "Woolf." Plus, there are some loving moments to be found. Elyot (Robert Montgomery) and Amanda (Norma Shearer) love each other so much that they despise each other. This divorced couple spends their honeymoon with their new spouses... together. Yeah, it's that screwy. They spend the film adoring each other and bludgeoning each other. And those two events constantly seesaw. The sensitivities of each are often trampled. This one is not for the feint of heart.

 

Okay you are surprising me yet again. I haven't seen Private Lives in ages so it is hard for me to comment directly on the film but I have often wondered how you would react to Norma Shearer. I have defended her so much that maybe I have become defensive about her. I want to see this one again because I remember it as being rather stagey.

 

As for Shearer, she is a fascinating enigma. Sophisticated, often over mannered and rather bold on the surface, she has a nervous underlining and an often eruptive sensuality that can sneak up on you. Hitchcock could have done wonders with her. I would have thought that of all her films you might have enjoyed The Women and you might have liked her performance in Escape (the closest she ever got to Hitchcock territory) Her early career is the most interesting though and now I will have to reassess everything!  :)   

 

36. *No Man of Her Own (1932)* -- I've been interested in seeing this film for a little while because of the pairing of Clark Gable and Carole Lombard. I was told it wasn't all that good. It's not that great, but it's not that bad, either. Gable plays Babe Stewart, a card sharp who is being tracked by the law. He's eventually forced to go "lay low," where he meets Connie (Carole), a bored librarian who says she's going to run off with the next interesting man in her life. The twist in the story is that Connie believes Babe is a respectable man. Does Babe really love Connie? Enough to change who he is? Can Connie love Babe for who he he really is? I thought Gable was Gable, Carole was cute, and Grant Mitchell was wonderful as Gable's partner in crime.

 

I first watched this film with high expectations ages ago and came away disappointed. I revisited it a while back and liked it somewhat better. Agreed it's not great but it has some interesting moments. Your last sentence sums it all up pretty well.

 

42. Three on a Match (1932) -- Bette Davis, Joan Blondell, and Ann Dvorak, together? Wow! Now that's quite a gathering. Now add in Bogie and Warren William. This has to be good! It didn't live up to the billing, for me. Ann, Joan, and Bette play three schoolyard friends. Ann is the "goody two shoes," Joan is the "bad girl," and Bette is their friend in the middle. As time goes on, everyone is playing their part. That is, until Ann, who is married with a son, starts to feel restless in her life and chooses to be "bad" for the first time. It's downhill from there. Harsh, pre-code lessons are to be learned. This is definitely Ann Dvorak's film, all the way. The rest of the cast is on the vanilla side. 

 

A  couple of thoughts about this film, I find the set up of the three friends to be interesting. Davis and Blondell are good and important to the structure of the story. I like the way the story comes around.

 

The second thing is that Ann Dvorak really makes this a great film. You see her slide into the gutter and lose everything she has. You get the interesting pre-code situations. It is those final scenes of Dvorak in the apartment and her reactions and eventual final decision that are so memorable and push the film in the direction of being a minor classic. The final toast provides a fitting close.

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I'll definitely get to replying to your post tomorrow, Molo.  You deserve lots of credit for digging that far back!  Amazing!

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Hey there Frank,

 

It has been a lot of fun going through the thread and catching up with all the films you've seen. Plus I get to read all the great discussions. I'm up to page 34 I think. Still a ways to go. I'll get there though.  :) 

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Hiya, Grahame's Guy -- Frank has watched about 10,000 movies it seems and I haven't commented on a good many of them, even the ones I recommended. I have been going through his old lists and now I am going to try and "catch up" on as many as I can.

 

You're a glutton for punishment!

 

This is going to take a while so any time he puts out a new list I will just stop and concentrate on that one. Then start again when there is another opening.

 

I hope I find the energy!

 

I have gone some seventy pages back in this thread and I might eventually go even further back ( I have to find those Fred and Ginger comments). So this is the first in a series of "ketchup" posts.  

 

Some of your favorites have been watched.  Definitely Fred & Ginger.  Jean Harlow.  Charlie Chan.  Heck if I remember when!

 

I really liked this film too. I have said in the past that I haven't cared that much for Burt Lancaster but I going to stop saying that now. I think it all comes from when I was a kid watching the late movie. (Back then, at least where I lived, you only had two choices at that hour. The late movie or Carson and I picked the movie usually.) I would see him in films like The Rose Tattoo and Come Back, Little Sheba. Those films are a lot to digest for a ten year old boy who has the TV on while he is playing army by himself. Yet I would see things on the surface of these films that made lasting impressions as I later became a serious film buff. My  impression of Burt suffered from this.

 

That's funny!  If my first viewing of Burt was The Rose Tattoo, I'd probably avoid him.  That's my least favorite performance for him.  I like the film, but not him.  I believe the first time I watched Burt was Elmer Gantry.  That was the perfect kind of film for me to like Burt.

 

Now I see him in films like The Killers and feel like I'm really just discovering him as an actor. This is one of those films that has really changed my mind about him. I liked the story, the feel of the film. It's a great historical film. I also really liked Big Eli. I was with his character the whole way here.

 

I loved seeing "down home" Burt in The Kentuckian.  Loved the little "family" and the romance.  A very different kind of picture for Burt.  And a very different kind of toque!

 

I commented on this one recently in the noir thread. I agree it is suspenseful. I actually like Ruth best when she's bad.

 

I never knew Ruth Roman could be bad!  I usually find Ruth to be appealing.

 

Oh this is a favorite of mine. I agree with you about the creepiness. The film looks wonderfully weird using the two strip Technicolor.  Defintely a Warners horror film with Farrell and McHugh rolling out the dialog at a quick clip. The early fire scene was wonderfully done and the way the wax figures succumb to the flames has always stayed in my memory. Lionel Atwill is great.

 

That's a great description of Mystery of the Wax Museum.  I came away liking it quite a bit.  Watching "Torchy Blane" got me to appreciate Glenda.  Her scenes with McHugh crackle.  They are great fun together.  And Lionel is right at home in this one.  All of the ingredients worked with me.

 

You also saw The Ladykillers I see, It has been a long time since I have seen these films but count me as a big fan of the Ealing output. I actually really love the British humour.

 

You can count me as a fan of Alec Guinness!  I only knew him as Obi-Won Kenobi.  I didn't know he was such a great comedic actor.  One of the best.

 

I'm really glad that you are viewing all the Abbott & Costello films. I am having a hard time remembering this one but I have seen them all. The Universal Box Set is a treasure and I have all there films on DVD. Lou Costello to me is just one of the most naturally funny performers I have ever seen. He just makes me laugh everytime.

 

I liked A&C as a kid, but I didn't know their films.  I would see bits of them and find them funny.  They remain just as funny to me today as a kid.  Not that I've really grown up.  I seemingly prefer the later A&C, where the focus is primarily on them and not others.

 

So you have started on the Chan films here, with "Paris", "London", "Egypt" and "Shanghai" and others. I am probably going to make a separate post for just these Chan films. I am with you on the Middle East settings and for all the reasons you say. This is a favorite of mine as well.

 

I've been trying to watch the Chan films in order.  Needless to say, nobody around here likes them or has seen them. :D  I enjoy them a lot.  They go down easy.

   

I really like this film. I like the Hollywood story and the glimpse we get inside that era. Definitely a sweet film with the angle of trying to please the young fan at the end. Dix was good here in a role that must have struck close to home. The party with the stand-ins was certainly unique.

 

That was a very unique party.  Surreal, almost.  I can't believe Sam Fuller was one of the screenwriters for It Happened in Hollywood.

 

Stanwyck makes this film work for me. Brent is fine but Stanwyck keeps it interesting. In fact I thought the ending was rather abrupt. I was hoping they would seek some retribution for all they had endured.

 

Good point about the ending.  I liked seeing Barbara get to play both sides: tough and eventually loving.  Brent's character surely wasn't likable!  And George usually plays the likable guy.

 

I love the idea of this film. I agree about the cast. The earlier version called Outward Bound seems to me even more mysterious perhaps because it is such an early sound film. This one brings the war into it. I'm not sure which one I prefer.

 

I'll have to give Outward Bound a looksee!

 

I can understand your feelings on this one. I liked it pretty well because it was pretty much what I was expecting. The first part is good. Garson works herself easily into these kind of stories and as the picture progresses and we get into the scientific process, I liked the film's earnest portrayal of it all.

 

"Earnest" is a good word for Madame Curie and Greer Garson.  "Murderous" is another good word for Greer.

 

I think I may have liked this one more than you but not by much. Jean Arthur is one of my favorite actresses and I like Marshall too but this just felt very routine throughout. Bland is about right.

 

Jean is also one of my favorite performers, so that tells you how disappointed I was in If You Could Only Cook.

 

The Life of Jimmy Dolan is a better picture. I also think you are right on about the presence of "The Dead End Kids" as well. Despite Garfield, Sheridan, Rains and Robson this is basically a "Dead End Kids" film and you really have to take it that way. A lot of their Warners films were remakes of earlier pictures and in the process of being remade they become vehicles for the gang.

 

I like "The Dead End Kids" and this is actually one of their better Warners films. Having been fans of the gang through their various incarnations which eventually led to low budget slapstick, it is interesting to see them in these early films going up against the likes of Cagney and Garfield. Also they are remaking some pre code films and even though the remakes have their dark moments they really can't compare to the darker originals. You might contrast Mayor of Hell and Hell's Kitchen for another example. (Maybe you already have)

 

I'm definitely not a fan of the "Dead End Kids".  They annoy the heck out of me.  I haven't seen Hell's Kitchen, but I thought Mayor of Hell to be pretty good.

 

This is a good Warners style yarn. I liked the taxi war theme and I was mad at the start with the incident involving Guy Kibbee's Pop character. You are right about Cagney and it works well in the film. I liked Loretta Young as well. These early Young performances are some of my favorites.

 

Taxi! and Man's Castle are two films that find Loretta dealing with some rough dudes.

 

Well I'm a huge Hope fan and he and Goddard paired up for three really good comedies. There are a lot of fun moments here. Hope was at the top of his game during this era.

 

Absolutely love Hope and Goddard together.  Bob had me rolling in Nothing But the Truth.  I thought it was laugh-out-loud funny.

 

This film is coming up soon as part of the "Summer of Darkness" schedule. So people will get another chance to check it out. I saw this ages ago and it has always stuck with me. Billy Gray is a good child actor, particularly when doing comedy, but here he is practically unsettling and very intense with his suspicions of a new neighbor. 

 

You are right about the cinematography. There is wonderful and foreboding imagery throughout the film. I think that was most memorable for me. This is one of Dore Schary's lesser known "message pictures" that Mayer used to complain about when the two were battling at MGM.

 

I'll easily side with Dore over Louis most every time. :D  I didn't know Talk About a Stranger was coming up.  I highly recommend it to those who aren't looking for a heavy film noir.  I'd say it's "Disney noir".  The look is quite good for such a low-budget pic.

 

This is a fun one to watch.  I agree with everything you say here. Wonderful characters populate this sweet film. I particularly like Nat Pendleton, but really so many fine character actors get a chance to shine in this. It's a fairy tale.

 

I like your calling Lady for a Day a "fairy tale".  That's good.

 

Definitely an interesting role for Bogart and he really is remarkable here. A family man and working guy we see his disappointments and frustrations turned into something much darker. He loses himself. He loses control. He's a pawn for the agenda of others and Bogart really doesn't hold back with his performance.

 

That's a great synopsis of Black Legion.  It's a harrowing film.

 

"Charming" is a good word to describe this one. We get a different Bogart here. I loved the  boarding house and all the characters in it. I like Sheridan and Bogart together as well. It's really fun to watch Bogart in this. He is uncertain of the whole set up at first, and then he becomes sort of bemused by it all. Staring back at the stuffed live animals that are staring at him in his room, scaring suspicious ZaSu Pitts to the point of hysterics, it's all good fun and one of his more unique films, particularly for his early career.

 

Another good write-up!  The oddball elements of this film make it somewhat similar to You Can't Take It with You.

 

I was wondering what you would think of this one. It's certainly different than any other Tracy/Hepburn film. It has been too long since I have seen it. I remember Spencer pursuing the story and being fascinated by the way Kate handles it all.

 

I enjoyed Keeper of the Flame.  It really is a very different kind of Tracy/Hepburn film.  Oddly enough, I don't seem to like some of their best-liked pictures (Adam's Rib & Woman of the Year).  It's the "lesser ones" that have struck a chord with me.

 

I wanted this one to be better too. It's a great premise but they seem to run out of good ideas somewhere along the way. I still enjoyed it for the most part though. When I discovered Joan Davis I didn't know what to make of her at first but then I started to warm up and now she is a favorite of mine. She is good in support but a few of her starring vehicles such as Kansas City Kitty and Beautiful But Broke are pretty darn funny.

 

In Hold That Ghost she is very funny. She may have been a little too funny for Lou who I think felt she got more laughs than he cared for in an A&C picture. She never worked with them again.

 

Ha!  That got a chuckle out of me.  I can believe it.  I thought Joan was funnier than Lou in their bit.

 

Also the Andrews Sisters had appeared in the first two A&C films and they were originally not in this picture. It seems Universal did some testing and felt that the audience expected to see them so they were brought in with Ted Lewis to film the two scenes that bookend the film. I like the Andrews Sisters, especially when they are actually involved in the stories of the film in which they appear, but they didn't add much to this film.

 

I'm less fond of the musical-comedy A&C compared to the straight comedy A&C.  But I did like the Andrews Sisters when they were in the actual story.

 

You really surprised me here! I wasn't sure you would care for this one at all. I'm so glad you liked it. I like Skelton but sometimes he can be a bit much. In this he is toned down just enough and is character is really likable and funny. I can never seem to get enough of O'Brien and in this film she is finally given a lead role. You are right they are both wonderful.

 

Loved Virginia in Merton of the Movies.  She's a doll.  As for Red, this was my first viewing of him and I was surprised to like him.  I thought he would be too much, as you say.

 

Generally O'Brien sings and she is great with the deadpan expression and novelty songs, yet in this film she doesn't sing a note. Having worked herself up to this level and doing so well in this film, I have never figured out exactly why her career basically ended after this picture.

 

I have since seen Virginia sing her novelty songs and I have liked those, as well.  That's an upset!  She's a good one.

 

Gloria was pretty funny in this. I liked the scene where she tries to get Red drunk. I wish she got to do more comedy but it probably would have changed the course of her career.
 

Gloria was good as the "star".  It's another role that seems to fit her well.

 

Okay you are surprising me yet again. I haven't seen Private Lives in ages so it is hard for me to comment directly on the film but I have often wondered how you would react to Norma Shearer. I have defended her so much that maybe I have become defensive about her. I want to see this one again because I remember it as being rather stagey.

 

As for Shearer, she is a fascinating enigma. Sophisticated, often over mannered and rather bold on the surface, she has a nervous underlining and an often eruptive sensuality that can sneak up on you. Hitchcock could have done wonders with her. I would have thought that of all her films you might have enjoyed The Women and you might have liked her performance in Escape (the closest she ever got to Hitchcock territory) Her early career is the most interesting though and now I will have to reassess everything!  :)   

 

Ironically, I have recently talked to Snippy and Bittersour T about my odd attraction to Norma.  I don't know what it is.  I haven't seen many of her films, but I'm looking to watch more of her.  I don't like The Women all that much with the exception of Norma.  And I'm sure I'm probably one of the few who would cite Norma as their favorite of those in The Women.  I haven't seen Escape.  I'll look to watch it soon.

 

A  couple of thoughts about this film, I find the set up of the three friends to be interesting. Davis and Blondell are good and important to the structure of the story. I like the way the story comes around.

 

My issue with Bette and Joan is that I find both to be rather uninteresting.  And for me to think that of those two actresses, it's saying a heckuva lot.  They don't seem to be themselves in Three on a Match.  Heck, even Warren William doesn't seem like himself.

 

The second thing is that Ann Dvorak really makes this a great film. You see her slide into the gutter and lose everything she has. You get the interesting pre-code situations. It is those final scenes of Dvorak in the apartment and her reactions and eventual final decision that are so memorable and push the film in the direction of being a minor classic. The final toast provides a fitting close.

 

Now this I can agree with.  The film is completely Ann's and I think she does a nice job.  Ann is an actress I'm starting to like a bit more.

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Hey there Frank,

 

Some of your favorites have been watched.  Definitely Fred & Ginger.  Jean Harlow.  Charlie Chan.  Heck if I remember when!

 

I may have to dig back even farther! This could take a while. :)

 

That's funny!  If my first viewing of Burt was The Rose Tattoo, I'd probably avoid him.  That's my least favorite performance for him.  I like the film, but not him.  I believe the first time I watched Burt was Elmer Gantry.  That was the perfect kind of film for me to like Burt.

 

I haven't seen Elmer Gantry yet. I have it though. Some day!

 

I liked A&C as a kid, but I didn't know their films.  I would see bits of them and find them funny.  They remain just as funny to me today as a kid.  Not that I've really grown up.  I seemingly prefer the later A&C, where the focus is primarily on them and not others.

 

I tend to agree. When I was around ten I went to a summer camp that had I think four movie nights. Every film was an A&C film. I guess they figured they were safe with those. I have always liked them.

 

I've been trying to watch the Chan films in order.  Needless to say, nobody around here likes them or has seen them. :D  I enjoy them a lot.  They go down easy.

 

I think I started with some of the later Warner Oland ones, then went to some of the Toler Chans. I'll be writing about them soon. I like them! I think Bronxie likes them too. She's our kind of gal!  :)

 

I'm definitely not a fan of the "Dead End Kids".  They annoy the heck out of me.  I haven't seen Hell's Kitchen, but I thought Mayor of Hell to be pretty good.

 

Babble Alert!

 

Have you seen Dead End? ( I guess I'll find out) That's the reason we have the Dead End Kids in the first place. On Dress Parade is one you might try. It's different than the others.

 

After they left Warners their history gets really confusing. A few of them would work together at Universal. Keep 'Em Slugging is one I like that features a few of them there. Most of them ended up at Monogram. Billy Hallop is gone at this point.

 

At Monogram they became the East Side Kids but the first film called East Side Kids doesn't feature any of the gang. Gorcey, Hall, Jordan and Dell made those films, joined by Ernest "Sunshine Sammy" Morrison and a few other interchangable actors. It's all low budget from here on out. These films mixed some serious themes with humor and gradually they became out and out comedies. I like them pretty well.

 

After the war they became the "Bowery Boys" and that is probably their most popular period. That started with Gorcey, Hall and Jordan, along with Billy Benedict and David Gorcey. Those early films are pretty entertaining.It's all mainly for laughs now. Hanging out at Louie's (Bernard Gorcey) malt shop and getting into various kinds of trouble. Some pretty funny running gags too. Routine nine!

 

They tended to follow A&C doing low budget versions of ideas that were borrowed from the A&C films. but they did other stuff too. It really comes down to whether you like Gorcey and Hall. They were the comedy team and eventually the only two of the original gang left. I find them pretty funny and I like the low budget and "on the fly" nature of their films.

 

Finally Huntz Hall was the last man standing and it all ended in 1958 with the last Bowery Boys film In the Money. A quite respectable twenty year run for the gang. 

 

Loved Virginia in Merton of the Movies.  She's a doll.  As for Red, this was my first viewing of him and I was surprised to like him.  I thought he would be too much, as you say.

 

O'Brien and and Skelton appear together in Panama Hattie which is a musical that I like. Ann Southern is in that too as well as Rags Ragland, who is another favorite of mine. 

 

Ironically, I have recently talked to Snippy and Bittersour T about my odd attraction to Norma.  I don't know what it is.  I haven't seen many of her films, but I'm looking to watch more of her.  I don't like The Women all that much with the exception of Norma.  And I'm sure I'm probably one of the few who would cite Norma as their favorite of those in The Women.  I haven't seen Escape.  I'll look to watch it soon.

 

This is really interesting to me! I can't wait to see what you think of some of Shearer's other films. As for The Women I agree that many would not pick Norma as their favorite in that crowd. She is the central figure but all the others are mainly playing for laughs and of course a lot of people like Joan Crawford's man eating portrayal of Crystal Allen. I'm sure that fashion show went down well with you too. :)

 

Now this I can agree with.  The film is completely Ann's and I think she does a nice job.  Ann is an actress I'm starting to like a bit more.

 

I'm not sure Ann ever really matched that performance. I haven't seen all her films though.

 

Okay I'm going to keep digging in this thread. It is great seeing what you think about all these films. I remember when you wouldn't watch a musical to save your life.  :) 

 

 

 

 

 

   

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I've long been a fan of Alec Guiness and "Kind Hearts" is one of the reasons. Gloriously dry, as you say, but wickedly funny in a subtle way. 

 

Other Guiness comedies to look for include "The Man In The White Suit," "The Lavender Hill Mob," "Last Holiday" (though more gentle than the others) than after "The Lady Killers" he drifted to drama where he lived until "Murder By Death."

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I may have to dig back even farther! This could take a while. :)

 

You'll never get out of Chumley's if you do that!

 

I haven't seen Elmer Gantry yet. I have it though. Some day!

 

I don't see you going for it.  Burt is explosively "Burt".

 

I tend to agree. When I was around ten I went to a summer camp that had I think four movie nights. Every film was an A&C film. I guess they figured they were safe with those. I have always liked them.

 

An A&C summer camp?  Who knew?

 

I think I started with some of the later Warner Oland ones, then went to some of the Toler Chans. I'll be writing about them soon. I like them! I think Bronxie likes them too. She's our kind of gal!  :)

 

She is!  She's always been one of my faves.

 

Have you seen Dead End? ( I guess I'll find out) That's the reason we have the Dead End Kids in the first place. On Dress Parade is one you might try. It's different than the others.

 

Yes I have.  And I pretty much liked it.  I would have loved it if the "Dead End Kids" weren't in it.  It was everyone else who had me hooked.  The worst one I have seen is Angels with Dirty Faces.  That killed me.

 

After they left Warners their history gets really confusing. A few of them would work together at Universal. Keep 'Em Slugging is one I like that features a few of them there. Most of them ended up at Monogram. Billy Hallop is gone at this point.

 

At Monogram they became the East Side Kids but the first film called East Side Kids doesn't feature any of the gang. Gorcey, Hall, Jordan and Dell made those films, joined by Ernest "Sunshine Sammy" Morrison and a few other interchangable actors. It's all low budget from here on out. These films mixed some serious themes with humor and gradually they became out and out comedies. I like them pretty well.

 

After the war they became the "Bowery Boys" and that is probably their most popular period. That started with Gorcey, Hall and Jordan, along with Billy Benedict and David Gorcey. Those early films are pretty entertaining.It's all mainly for laughs now. Hanging out at Louie's (Bernard Gorcey) malt shop and getting into various kinds of trouble. Some pretty funny running gags too. Routine nine!

 

They tended to follow A&C doing low budget versions of ideas that were borrowed from the A&C films. but they did other stuff too. It really comes down to whether you like Gorcey and Hall. They were the comedy team and eventually the only two of the original gang left. I find them pretty funny and I like the low budget and "on the fly" nature of their films.

 

Finally Huntz Hall was the last man standing and it all ended in 1958 with the last Bowery Boys film In the Money. A quite respectable twenty year run for the gang. 

 

Impressive!  That was superb, Molo.  Love that you know their story that well.

 

O'Brien and and Skelton appear together in Panama Hattie which is a musical that I like. Ann Southern is in that too as well as Rags Ragland, who is another favorite of mine. 

 

I recorded that one, primarily for Ann.  I didn't know Virginia was in it.  That's another selling point.

 

This is really interesting to me! I can't wait to see what you think of some of Shearer's other films. As for The Women I agree that many would not pick Norma as their favorite in that crowd. She is the central figure but all the others are mainly playing for laughs and of course a lot of people like Joan Crawford's man eating portrayal of Crystal Allen. I'm sure that fashion show went down well with you too. :)

 

Ha!  Oh, yeah.  Loved it. :D

 

Okay I'm going to keep digging in this thread. It is great seeing what you think about all these films. I remember when you wouldn't watch a musical to save your life.  :)

 

I guess I'm suicidal now. :D

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I've long been a fan of Alec Guiness and "Kind Hearts" is one of the reasons. Gloriously dry, as you say, but wickedly funny in a subtle way. 

 

Other Guiness comedies to look for include "The Man In The White Suit," "The Lavender Hill Mob," "Last Holiday" (though more gentle than the others) than after "The Lady Killers" he drifted to drama where he lived until "Murder By Death."

 

I've seen all of those but Last Holiday.  And I really liked all those I've seen.  I also liked SansFin's suggestion of Our Man In Havana.  That's another goodie.

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Catching up. Part 3

 

Howdy Frank,

 

Still moving through the thread.

 

List 2/13/14

 

2. The Catered Affair (1956) -- And this is yet another filmed play that takes place in NYC. I seem to love these kind of films. This film comes as a major surprise to me since I was worried to find out it's about a wedding reception, something I loathe. But it turns out it's really about a family, namely a married couple played by Bette Davis and Ernest Borgnine. Both are exceptional. To see Bette playing a Brooklyn housewife is quite a spectacle. I also love Barry Fitzgerald in this film.

 

Bronxie write: So glad you appreciate THE CATERED AFFAIR! What do you think of Debbie? I love her here; she really displays serious acting chops.

Frank replies: I thought Debbie was pretty good. She was very sweet in her trap. But my focus was much more on Bette, Ernest, and Barry. They all help to convey quite a range of emotions. I liked Barry's budding romance with Mrs. Rafferty (Dorothy Stickney).

 

I liked this film well enough. I remember being impressed by Reynold’s performance. She really held her own here. I would like to see it again to give Bette Davis' performance another look. I recall being sympathetic to each character even in their different points of view. The pairing of Borgnine and Davis as a couple was what originally drew me to the film.

 

35. I'm No Angel (1933) -- It's looking like I may not be a fan of Mae West. And this actually surprises me. You'd think Mae's sexual innuendos would be right to my liking. And they sometimes are. It just seems like I can only take so much of Mae. The story in this film was very thin. I didn't buy Cary Grant falling as quickly as he did.

 

Miss G writes: I don't seem to get into her, either. She's too much of a caricature, I guess, they never show her just being human, or playing more of a "character" instead of the bold outlines of a provocateuse.

 

I like Mae West. She was a Hollywood singularity, an unlikely vessel for the view that sex is the heart of the matter in all things. Her innuendo is delicious. Her movement sublime. Her ample, tightly wrapped, hour glass shape entrances all the men around her. Her films and her character give pause to the idea that, while love is complicated, sexual desire is our most instinctive diversion against the troubles of life.

   

Watching her initial run of films you can feel she is in control on both sides of the camera. It was always a battle with the censors to see how far she could go. The stories are indeed thin and set up just for her arrival. The films are also very short, so we can all get out before she overheats.

 

It can all seem pretty base but West was never really vulgar. She knew what belonged on each side of the bedroom door. Once the films ended the idea lingered in the mind. She became part of the popular culture and the caricature became part of the persona.

 

I enjoyed these early films. She gets an unformed Cary Grant to play with in her first two starring vehicles. They are interesting together and any challenge she received came from him. Still it is all West's show. She was controversial in her time but her early popularity shows that many in those depression era audiences found her remarkable, refreshing and fun.

 

I am guessing that you have already seen She Done Him Wrong. That is my favorite Mae West film. I'm No Angel was pretty entertaining for me too. Belle of the Nineties isn't bad but more constrained, after that the code finally catches up with her. The later films can be fun too but she has to go in different directions.

 

I am also guessing you have seen her debut in Night After Night. She isn't the center of attention in that one but she is great in it. She steals the picture and makes it much better. It may be my favorite West performance. Maybe she will grow on you.

 

List 3/13/14

 

1. The Blue Angel (1930) -- I wasn't captivated by this film until the final act. The last act is a knockout. It makes this film one of the very first "films noir". I was stunned to see this. The story is clearly "film noir", as a repressed older gentleman (Emil Jannings) falls for a young nightclub performer (Marlene Dietrich). Happy endings! Emil matches his brilliant performance in *The Last Laugh*. He's outstanding. It's easy to see how Marlene would find her way to Hollywood after this film. She's the more accessible Garbo.

 

I see you have been going through the Dietrich/von Sternberg films. These were some of the first films I watched when home video made older films more accessible. I can't believe that it is going on thirty years now and except for Blonde Venus and Shanghai Express I don't think I have come back to any of them. It's not because I didn't like them, I was fairly mesmerized by these early Dietrich films, I just went on to other things.

 

The Blue Angel does stay with you though. Poor Professor Rath! I agree with you about the last act. I never really thought about it as one of the first noirs but I agree with you there too. Dietrich came of age in Weimar Germany and no matter all the promotion, her own feelings and actions; or Sternberg's lighting; or the role she was playing; the sad, fatal decadence of that period always shown on her face. As Lola she is in the moment. I love watching her. 

 

2. Hail the Conquering Hero (1944) -- Everything that is great about Preston Sturges can be found in this wonderful comedy. The zany characters and situations are abundant. The smart socio-political commentary is ever present. The misinterpretations are all over the place. The love for one's characters is pleasing. It's all so terrific. I loved all the performers, from Eddie Bracken and Ella Raines to the always fantastic William Demarest to the Strurges standbys of Raymond Walburn, Franklin Pangborn, and Jimmy Conlin.

 

I just loaned out some Sturges films the other day. I don't know what possessed him during those few years and those few remarkable films but I'm definitely thankful. This is one of my favorites. I agree with everything you say here. 

 

MissGoddess writes: Eddie Bracken is a stumbling block for me. I find him too annoying to enjoy the films. I also rarely like "sap" movies.

 

Frank responds: Film noir is full of saps! When Robert Mitchum is a sap, that's all right. You don't like weak saps. Eddie is also a goober. That's never going to work with you.

 

Butterscotchgreer writes: I always love Eddie Bracken in anything. He gives a fresh perspective on the more physical side of comedy....like Jack kind of!

 

Thank you sweet Baby T, wherever you are! I'll take Bracken in anything too. He may be a sap and a goober but I love his comedic talent. MissG., I get your point. It is funny how performers just strike people differently. Frank seems to have it all figured out. :)

 

The whole cast is great. I also enjoyed Demarest a lot in this film. He and Bracken work off of each other well. (Bracken and Hutton do too I think, but those are other films.) It will be interesting to see what you think of the other Sturges films as I move through the thread.

 

7. In This Our Life (1942) -- I wanted to check this film out because it's directed by John Huston. What I was very pleased to find was a great Bette Davis performance. She plays a wreck of a young woman in this picture. She goes after what is not hers just because she wants it. It's selfishness run amok in a way that only Bette can do. She puts on a real show. Charles Coburn plays a character I never thought I'd see him play. Jaw-dropping! And I really liked Bette's defeated father in the film, played by Frank Craven. I also liked the interesting ending. Times haven't changed all that much. This is a good one.

 

MissGoddess writes: You are so unpredictable! I figured you would have loathed Bette and the whole thing. It is entertaining and the Charles Coburn twist is what really bends one's mind. This and his doctor in King's Row really show what an outstanding actor he was.

 

I'm with MissG., in my surprise on this one. This is why I never like to rank how you like films! I never thought of this as particularly great but I did enjoy it. There is certainly a lot going on. Davis is definitely something to see here and I thought her scenes with Coburn where memorable.

 

Another thing is that while it is never precisely mentioned, the film takes place in my hometown of Richmond. It is obvious from the source material. I can't think of another film that takes place here and it is not even an historical film!

 

I have to also give a shout out to Hattie McDaniel. She didn't get a lot of chances but she knew how to make the most out of an opportunity. She does so here.

 

4. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969) -- The discussion about this film is precisely why I greatly enjoyed this picture. I found it all so fascinating; the methods of teaching, the damaged soul, the romanticism, the delusions, the damage one can project on the impressionable youth, the egotism, the Shakespearean/Tennessee Williams quality of the lead character, all of it. It's such a provocative film. Maggie Smith is marvelous as the titular character. She projects everything you'd want from this character.

 

Four fifteen. Not four, not four thirty, but four fifteen. Hmm. She thinks to intimidate me by the use of quarter hours? -Jean Brodie

 

I don't know why but I always loved that line.

 

This film was my introduction to Maggie Smith. Another film I saw as a kid on the late show that I am sure went right over my head. I saw it again a number of years ago and the performance and the character of Jean left quite an impression, again. She is such a fascinating character.

I enjoyed reading the discussion of this film in the thread and there was some comparison to Blanche from Streetcar. Do you remember discussing this film in this thread as part of your lists? If so I will have to search for it.

 

MissGoddess was really rolling here too:

 

Jean is not the same as Blanche, spiritually however you look at it. the similarities are in the retreat from reality, but not the reasons behind it. i judge by motives and jean's seem too ego driven.  

 

so much for an iron will, she ends up going mad. people with iron wills drive OTHERS mad and so remain sane. I think Blanche is TOO VULNERABLE TO REALITY while Jean forces reality to fit her ideas. She will never acknowledge reality is what it is but Blanche knows it, sees it but RUNS from it into her delusions. Jean thinks the world IS the way she sees it.

 

There was a lot of great back and forth between several of you in that discussion. I am mad at myself for not being around but that is why I wanted to go back through this thread.   

 

I think your description of the film and the character is wonderful. I have such a soft spot for damaged people and I felt for Jean even when she was irritating, disappointing and wrong. It is a bit murky in my mind but this may be an example of a flawed character, played so well and, at times, so movingly; that my sympathies end up going to places I didn’t think they would go.

 

I will watch this again and I will be paying more attention to Sandy (Pamela Franklin). She is, I think, the pivotal character that I am distracted from by Smith’s enthralling portrayal. If that makes any sense. :)     

 

15. Ringside Maisie (1941) -- A very entertaining "Maisie" film! It's my second favorite, thus far. Maisie (Ann Sothern) was back to being "Maisie"; full of great spunk. In this outing, Maisie finds herself "rescued" by a boxer (Robert Sterling) whose best friend (George Murphy) also serves as his manager. The ambitious manager has his eyes set on the title but does his meal ticket feel the same? Adding to the emotion in the film is the boxer's wheelchair-bound mother, played by Margaret Moffatt. There's a lot in play. And the boxing scenes are actually good.

 

I see you have been going through the Maisie films. This is one of my favorites of the series. I do like Ann in these films. She is always enjoyable to watch and most of these films give her a chance to deal with some serious stuff and let her have her lighter moments as well. I agree about the boxing scenes and I think that whole angle is presented very well. Not a huge Murphy fan but he is okay here. Rags Ragland and Virginia O'Brien pop up too. I also like Max Rosenbloom.

 

Like so many of the films on your list it has been a while since I've seen this but it is one of the Maisie series that I will pull out watch again from time to time.  

 

 

25. Heroes for Sale (1933) -- The beginning to this film had me drooling. I thought the film was going to be about war-induced drug addiction in the early-30s. I was all ready to hail this film. But the film quickly leaves that behind and it adds more and more to it. By film's end, I could have sworn I just watched the "Forrest Gump" of the Great Depression. William Wellman basically looked to cover as many social issues as he possibly could in one picture. This watered down the product for me. I did like the performance of stony Richard Barthelmess. He fits this Depression Era. Aline MacMahon and Charley Grapewin are the two I liked most.

 

I remember mentioning this to you a long time ago. Again it has been a while but I thought you would like this one. I think you are right about Wellman throwing a lot of issues into the picture. 

 

The beginning scenes catch your attention. I did like the Barthelmess character and, as is often the case, I particularly liked Aline MacMahon. I find most of Wellman's films interesting, well paced and usually pretty good.

 

34. Sunrise at Campobello (1960) -- Uh-oh, a biopic. I'm worried! But I actually liked this one. It's about FDR's struggle with his polio-induced paralysis. Ralph Bellamy plays the former president and he does so beautifully. This is Ralph's greatest performance, in my eyes. But as good as Ralph is, I liked Hume Cronyn even more. Hume plays FDR's political adviser, Louis Howe. He brings a touch of everything to the film. Greer Garson plays Eleanor. It's a good role for her... if you can get past the false teeth. The ending is very nice.

 

Have you become a Greer Garson completist now? You’ll never get through The Happiest Millionaire!

 

This is one of the few films that I have watched in pieces a bit here and a bit there. It is hard to judge a film that way. You end up saying stuff like: I liked parts of it. You would think that I would enjoy it for the history part alone but I thought it moved a little slow.

 

Since you liked it I will try to watch it in one sitting when I get the chance.

 

38. Buck Privates (1941) -- A military musical? Nooooooooooooooooooo! This is not the A&C I like! I have learned that Abbott & Costello were nearly secondary in these early films. Here, it's more about the Andrews Sisters and a love triangle. While I do like some of the Andrews Sisters' songs, I was worn out by film's end. It's real trouble when Lee Bowman is who I like the most!

 

Yeeeeeeeeeessssssssssss!

 

Oh come on Frank. No.38 on your list? I love this film. It’s true that Bud and Lou are more secondary in these early films but they pack a lot of their routines into this one. I love the rifle drill, the dice game, pretty much all of them. The Andrews Sisters are at their best here too. It is probably more musical than you are comfortable with though. Most of my favorite A&C films come later but this one is right up there with me.   

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Hola, Grahame's Guy -- I liked this film well enough. I remember being impressed by Reynold’s performance. She really held her own here. I would like to see it again to give Bette Davis' performance another look. I recall being sympathetic to each character even in their different points of view. The pairing of Borgnine and Davis as a couple was what originally drew me to the film."

 

"Sympathetic" is a good word for The Catered Affair.  It really does make you feel for each of the principal characters.  I definitely feel it was a different kind of Bette.  I loved seeing her this way for a change.  This was my kind of "Father of the Bride".

 

I like Mae West. She was a Hollywood singularity, an unlikely vessel for the view that sex is the heart of the matter in all things. Her innuendo is delicious. Her movement sublime. Her ample, tightly wrapped, hour glass shape entrances all the men around her. Her films and her character give pause to the idea that, while love is complicated, sexual desire is our most instinctive diversion against the troubles of life.

   

Watching her initial run of films you can feel she is in control on both sides of the camera. It was always a battle with the censors to see how far she could go. The stories are indeed thin and set up just for her arrival. The films are also very short, so we can all get out before she overheats.

 

It can all seem pretty base but West was never really vulgar. She knew what belonged on each side of the bedroom door. Once the films ended the idea lingered in the mind. She became part of the popular culture and the caricature became part of the persona.

 

I enjoyed these early films. She gets an unformed Cary Grant to play with in her first two starring vehicles. They are interesting together and any challenge she received came from him. Still it is all West's show. She was controversial in her time but her early popularity shows that many in those depression era audiences found her remarkable, refreshing and fun.

 

Wow!  That was sensational!  Such great writing.  And I do agree with all that you wrote about Mae.  I love that she was very "hands on" with her on-screen persona.  Very impressive.  "Sex is the heart of the matter in all things."  Hmmmm, interesting.

 

I am guessing that you have already seen She Done Him Wrong. That is my favorite Mae West film. I'm No Angel was pretty entertaining for me too. Belle of the Nineties isn't bad but more constrained, after that the code finally catches up with her. The later films can be fun too but she has to go in different directions.

 

I've only seen I'm No Angel and My Little Chickadee, I believe.

 

I am also guessing you have seen her debut in Night After Night. She isn't the center of attention in that one but she is great in it. She steals the picture and makes it much better. It may be my favorite West performance. Maybe she will grow on you.

 

No, I haven't seen that, either.  And she could very well grow on me.  Many performers do.

 

I see you have been going through the Dietrich/von Sternberg films.

 

I think that was a happy coincidence.  If anything, I was probably trying to watch some of Marlene's best-known pics.

 

These were some of the first films I watched when home video made older films more accessible. I can't believe that it is going on thirty years now and except for Blonde Venus and Shanghai Express I don't think I have come back to any of them. It's not because I didn't like them, I was fairly mesmerized by these early Dietrich films, I just went on to other things.

 

That's really interesting.  And what's crazy is that I've gotten heavy into home video just when it's going the way of the dinosaur.

 

The Blue Angel does stay with you though. Poor Professor Rath! I agree with you about the last act. I never really thought about it as one of the first noirs but I agree with you there too. Dietrich came of age in Weimar Germany and no matter all the promotion, her own feelings and actions; or Sternberg's lighting; or the role she was playing; the sad, fatal decadence of that period always shown on her face. As Lola she is in the moment. I love watching her. 

 

Nicely said.  Particularly your Weimar decadence comment.

 

I just loaned out some Sturges films the other day. I don't know what possessed him during those few years and those few remarkable films but I'm definitely thankful. This is one of my favorites. I agree with everything you say here. 

 

Love Preston Sturges, as well.  He was a unique filmmaker.  I also like his troupe.

 

Thank you sweet Baby T, wherever you are!

 

I think she's locked up somewhere.  She took Greer's murderous on-screen roles a bit too seriously.  Texan women.

 

I'll take Bracken in anything too. He may be a sap and a goober but I love his comedic talent. MissG., I get your point. It is funny how performers just strike people differently. Frank seems to have it all figured out. :)

 

Not women!  Ahhh, the miseries, I mean, mysteries of life. :D

 

The whole cast is great. I also enjoyed Demarest a lot in this film. He and Bracken work off of each other well. (Bracken and Hutton do too I think, but those are other films.) It will be interesting to see what you think of the other Sturges films as I move through the thread.

 

That may have been the most recent one I watched.  I can't remember.

 

I'm with MissG., in my surprise on this one. This is why I never like to rank how you like films! I never thought of this as particularly great but I did enjoy it. There is certainly a lot going on. Davis is definitely something to see here and I thought her scenes with Coburn where memorable.

 

There's a darkness to In This Our Life that really connected with me.  A bit of a film noir vibe to it.

 

Another thing is that while it is never precisely mentioned, the film takes place in my hometown of Richmond. It is obvious from the source material. I can't think of another film that takes place here and it is not even an historical film!

 

Really?  And Richmond is a sizable city.  I'm surprised it has been featured so rarely in film.  I always get a chuckle out of hearing Harrisburg in pictures.

 

I have to also give a shout out to Hattie McDaniel. She didn't get a lot of chances but she knew how to make the most out of an opportunity. She does so here.

 

There is emotion attached to Hattie in this one.

 

Four fifteen. Not four, not four thirty, but four fifteen. Hmm. She thinks to intimidate me by the use of quarter hours? -Jean Brodie 

 

I don't know why but I always loved that line.

 

That's funny!  And I don't remember that line.

 

This film was my introduction to Maggie Smith. Another film I saw as a kid on the late show that I am sure went right over my head. I saw it again a number of years ago and the performance and the character of Jean left quite an impression, again. She is such a fascinating character.

 

Boy, is she ever.  And this may have been my first viewing of Maggie, as well.

 

I enjoyed reading the discussion of this film in the thread and there was some comparison to Blanche from Streetcar. Do you remember discussing this film in this thread as part of your lists? If so I will have to search for it.

 

I know the discussion took off after Quiet Gal watched it.  I believe she commented on the film on this thread.

 

I think your description of the film and the character is wonderful. I have such a soft spot for damaged people and I felt for Jean even when she was irritating, disappointing and wrong. It is a bit murky in my mind but this may be an example of a flawed character, played so well and, at times, so movingly; that my sympathies end up going to places I didn’t think they would go.

 

Perfectly said.  And, yes, I feel a character like Jean allows for a multitude of feelings towards her.  She's as imperfect as one can be, even though she views herself as perfect.

 

I will watch this again and I will be paying more attention to Sandy (Pamela Franklin). She is, I think, the pivotal character that I am distracted from by Smith’s enthralling portrayal. If that makes any sense. :)

 

Yes, Sandy is an integral character in the story.  Jean opens the door for Sandy and her own issues.

 

I see you have been going through the Maisie films. This is one of my favorites of the series. I do like Ann in these films. She is always enjoyable to watch and most of these films give her a chance to deal with some serious stuff and let her have her lighter moments as well. I agree about the boxing scenes and I think that whole angle is presented very well. Not a huge Murphy fan but he is okay here. Rags Ragland and Virginia O'Brien pop up too. I also like Max Rosenbloom.

 

Jackie suggested the "Maisie" pics and "Torchy Blane" pics to me.  I liked Maisie more at the outset, but I now feel the "Torchy" flicks are better as a whole.

 

I remember mentioning this to you a long time ago. Again it has been a while but I thought you would like this one. I think you are right about Wellman throwing a lot of issues into the picture. 

 

The beginning scenes catch your attention. I did like the Barthelmess character and, as is often the case, I particularly liked Aline MacMahon. I find most of Wellman's films interesting, well paced and usually pretty good.

 

Wellman is a good director and I do like him.  But sometimes his alacrity hampers the building of emotion.  I think this is what holds him back with me.  I prefer a strong emotional pull in a film.

 

Have you become a Greer Garson completist now? You’ll never get through The Happiest Millionaire!

 

I've been told I must watch every Greer film or I'll be strangled to death.  I'm finally realizing I'd rather be strangled to death. :P

 

happiestmillionaire1_zpswueroldy.jpg

 

Three hours of Bible Class?!  I'm worried!

 

This is one of the few films that I have watched in pieces a bit here and a bit there. It is hard to judge a film that way. You end up saying stuff like: I liked parts of it. You would think that I would enjoy it for the history part alone but I thought it moved a little slow.

 

Sunrise at Campobello is a long film.  That can be a deterrent.  If you like Hume Cronyn and like seeing Ralph Bellamy turn in a strong performance, then the film is worth watching.

 

Oh come on Frank. No.38 on your list? I love this film. It’s true that Bud and Lou are more secondary in these early films but they pack a lot of their routines into this one. I love the rifle drill, the dice game, pretty much all of them. The Andrews Sisters are at their best here too. It is probably more musical than you are comfortable with though. Most of my favorite A&C films come later but this one is right up there with me.

 

You hit on it: more musical than comedy.  I'd rather there be less singing and more yuks.  A&C eventually gets to that point in their evolution.  For me that's a "thank goodness!"

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I'm going to attempt to write a bit again.  But instead of writing everything at once, I'm going to write about ten films at a time.  I'm combining an earlier list I posted with more films I have watched.  This is a super long list, I know.  And I don't expect anyone to comment on everything they have seen from this list.  But if you wish to comment on any of the films, please feel free to do so.  If you wish to wait until I wrote my comments about a film before chiming in, that's fine too.

 

All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)

All the King's Men (1949)

Along the Great Divide (1951)

Appointment with Danger (1951)

Around the World in Eighty Days (1956)

Arrowhead (1953)

Bachelor Mother (1939)

The Bad Sister (1931)

Beware of Pity (1946)

Break of Hearts (1935)

The Broadway Melody (1929)

Butterfield 8 (1960)

Cain and Mabel (1936)

Cavalcade (1933)

The Children's Hour (1961)

Cimarron (1931)

City That Never Sleeps (1953)

Colt .45 (1950)

Conspirator (1949)

Dames (1934)

Dead Men Tell (1941)

Dear Brigitte (1965)

Distant Drums (1951)

A Double Life (1947)

The Earl of Chicago (1940)

The Emperor's Candlesticks (1937)

The Enforcer (1951)

Escape from Burma (1955)

Ex-Lady (1933)

Flamingo Road (1949)

Flight from Ashiya (1964)

Forbidden (1932)

Fraulein (1958)

A Free Soul (1931)

The Gazebo (1959)

Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)

Golden Boy (1939)

Gone to Earth (1950)

The Gorgeous Hussy (1936)

The Great Ziegfeld (1936)

The Happy Thieves (1961)

Hatter's Castle (1942)

Hell's Half Acre (1954)

Her Cardboard Lover (1942)

Her Private Affair (1929)

The Hoodlum (1951)

If Winter Comes (1947)

In the French Style (1963)

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)

I Walk Alone (1948)

Keep 'Em Flying (1941)

Killers of Kilimanjaro (1959)

Kismet (1944)

Kitty Foyle (1940)

Ladies of Leisure (1930)

The Lady from Cheyenne (1941)

Lady on a Train (1945)

Lady with a Past (1932)

The Late George Apley (1947)

Lawyer Man (1932)

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943)

The Life of Emile Zola (1937)

Loan Shark (1952)

Love on the Run (1936)

The Loves of Edgar Allan Poe (1942)

Luxury Liner (1933)

Mad Dog Coll (1961)

The Man with the Gun (1955)

Margin for Error (1943)

Mexicali Rose (1929)

The Naked Street (1955)

The Old Maid (1939)

One Sunday Afternoon (1933)

One Touch of Venus (1948)

On the Double (1961)

Out of the Blue (1947)

Portrait in Black (1960)

Psyche 59 (1964)

Raffles (1930)

Rain (1932)

The Redhead from Wyoming (1953)

Red Skies of Montana (1952)

Rings on Her Fingers (1942)

The Road to Singapore (1931)

Roxie Hart (1942)

Ruthless (1948)

Sandra (1965)

The Saxon Charm (1948)

Second Honeymoon (1937)

Siege at Red River (1954)

Singin' in the Rain (1952)

The Sleeping Tiger (1954)

The Southerner (1945)

Strangers in the Night (1944)

The Story of Temple Drake (1933)

Sylvia (1965)

Take a Letter, Darling (1942)

Tea and Sympathy (1956)

Tension at Table Rock (1956)

A Terrible Beauty (1960)

The Thief (1952)

Thunder Over the Plains (1953)

Till the Clouds Roll By (1946)

The Time Machine (1960)

Toni (1935)

Top Gun (1955)

Trader Horn (1931)

Untamed (1955)

Way of a Gaucho (1952)

Wild in the Country (1961)

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Molo, that was a nice bit on Mae you did there (Scott eloquently points that out). I read once she was quite bitter about the Code. It ruined her career. It might be said that she lost control of both sides of the camera with that. They wouldn't let her do her stuff. I did not research this, just remember it somewhere, did I remember right? I'm too lazy to look myself.

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Sir Francis:

 

I've seen quite a few of these but to comment on a couple -

 

"Bachelor Mother" has always been a treat for me. Anything with Charles Coburn is a bonus. (Check "Vivacious Lady" where he costars with Ginger.) It's funny and you get to see Ginger dance a little.

 

"Singin' In The Rain" is just a great picture. Great dancing, funny situations. It's just a joy. I have a friend who is a dean a local school and his school was putting on a performance of it and he had never seen the movie. I'm still waiting on a review from him.

 

"Colt .45." Ordinary but entertaining enough Randolph Scott picture.

 

Some others we can come back to later. 

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LARRY!!!: Thank you sweet Baby T, wherever you are!

 

Hi Larry! I'm here! I'm sorry, I've been caught up with a lot recently. Everything sort of happened with my life and it all came at me at once. It's been a bit overwhelming. I do miss it on here and all of you and your beautiful writings. I sign in every once a while to read. I promise. :) I was planning on coming back on here shortly anyway. How are you, darling?

 

Mr. Jack in the box: I think she's locked up somewhere.  She took Greer's murderous on-screen roles a bit too seriously.  Texan women.

 

How rude! :D Texan women?! My poor Greer! What did she do to deserve such treatment? She is perfect and you know it! :P I'll get to your movie list shortly, you meanie! Heehee!

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