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The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

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Just a few minutes ahead of the actual day.. but didn't want to miss the chance to pop in and wish you a happy Birthday, O Grey One. :D

 

Hope your day is a blast!! :D

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Scott, I guess the saying applies to me as being "a day late and a dollar short" (well, several dollars) but a heartfelt Happy Birthday to you. This place is lucky to have you and we are too.

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Thank you Quiet Gal, Bronxie, Grahame's Guy, and Cowboy Chris for the birthday wishes!  I greatly appreciate them.  I loved the wide range of greeters.  From Gabrielle (who?!) to Imhotep to Norma Shearer.  That's one crazy birthday bash!

 

And thank you Movieman for the very kind words.  Too kind!

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Glad to hear that the Grey Dude had a good b-day!! 

 

 

And now.. from the "grey" to the SPARKLY!! Just want to say.. happy, happy, HAPPY Birthday to Sweet Little T!!!!! Hope  your day is fabulous little gal!! 

 

Time to celebrate!! Sparkly Cupcakes for everybody!!!! :D

 

 

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I'm not sparkly?!  Oh, wait.  That's a good thing.

 

Happy Birthday to BittersourGreer!  I hope she learns to laugh and have fun as her birthday present.  She's too darn serious! :P

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I missed Butterscotchgreer's Birthday!

 

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Now I'm in big trouble!

 

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Sorry for being tardy Sweet T

 

Hope you had a great day!

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Great cap, Molo.

 

I did too. HappyBirthday Greer!

 

And a belated Birthday Greeting to Scott.

 

laffite

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All right, let's see how far I get with this. :D

 

Denotes: film can be found on YouTube.

 

1. The Time Machine (1960) -- I was pleasantly surprised by the emotion in this sci-fi classic.  I also loved some of the questions the film posed.  Even while the advancement in science and human knowledge grows and grows, there's still something beautiful about a simple life with love.  Ignorance is bliss.  Is it?  Rod Taylor is an actor I enjoy. I like his physicality.  But he plays the smart guy in this one.  I greatly enjoyed Alan Young.  Love "Willlllbur".  I loved his devotion to H. George Wells (Taylor).  I liked the actual time machine.  The quaintness of it.  And there's also the lovely, sweet Yvette Mimieux.  The film really struck a chord with me.

 

2. Toni (1935) -- What a revelation this film was.  This is a film produced by Marcel Pagnol and directed by Jean Renoir.  I feel it combines elements of both, which helps to make this film a hidden gem.  You will find the rich characters of Pagnol and the existential theme of Renoir.  Love, lust, devotion, betrayal, selfishness, and sacrifice are to be found.  And it's all presented in a humanistic way, as both Pagnol and Renoir are known to be exceptional at doing.

 

3. Ladies of Leisure (1930) -- The first pairing of Frank Capra and Barbara Stanwyck was a winner with me.  Barbara's brash party girl collides with a shy artist (Ralph Graves) and an opposites-attract relationship develops.  I just love it when Barbara plays these kind of characters, ala The Lady Eve and Ball of Fire.  The film has some nice dramatic flourishes and I especially liked the ending.  The lack of an interesting male presence works for me in this kind of 30s film since the fella isn't that confident to start with.

 

4. Forbidden (1932) -- Another 30s flick?!  What's wrong with me?! Ahhhh, but it's Capra and Stanwyck, back together again.  Magical.  I'd say this film is a precursor to Now, Voyager!.  The framework is somewhat similar.  But this film digs a lot deeper.  There are some serious dilemmas involved in this one, and how it all plays out is strongly felt.  It certainly raises the question, "what would you do?"  Adolphe Menjou plays Barbara's rendezvous.  I usually don't see Adolphe in such a role, but he was quite good here.

 

5. BUtterfield 8 (1960) -- From the 30s to Liz Taylor soapy trash?  Huh?  Yeah, well, when soapy trash is done right, I'm for it.  And this one was done right.  In an odd way, this is the trashy version of Breakfast at Tiffany's.  It's dirty and cheap and emotionally strong.  Liz sure knew how to do dirty and cheap and do it with such class and beauty.  She continues to rise with me.  The two men in her life are quite the contrast.  One is a selfish jerk and the other the nice guy.  Laurence Harvey and Eddie Fisher play the men.  I bet you cannot guess who plays who. :D  The supporting cast of Mildred Dunnock, Betty Field, and Dina Merrill are all good.  But Mildred and Betty are the standouts.  Can't say I liked the ending that much, though.

 

6. The Enforcer (1951) -- I admit, the title of this film always kept me from watching it.  It seemed so bland for a Humphrey Bogart picture.  And I still don't like the title.  But the film was a real nice surprise.  Bogie plays a district attorney looking to break the crime syndicate, Murder Inc..  While the supporting cast of Everett Sloane, Ted de Corsia, and Zero Mostel (yes, this helped lead him to "Hold me, touch me") doesn't necessarily strike fear in one's heart, it proves compelling.  What also helps this film is a dark secret that is eventually revealed.  If you're looking for lots of Bogie, the film may be a letdown.  He's only a component.

 

7. Sylvia (1965) -- Miss Goddess posted her favorite films a while ago and I attempted to watch all of them.  All of them I did watch.  All but this elusive title.  I eventually found a way to view it.  It didn't disappoint.  And it's so very much "Miss G".  Sylvia is played by a favorite of mine, fellow Quaker Stater, Carroll Baker.  And while Carroll is very good in the picture, the film is more about catching up with Sylvia. And I guess you could say this could be the trashy version of Laura. :D  George Maharis is the private detective who is hired to find out what he can about the mysterious Sylvia and her past.  The cast is loaded with credible performers, such as Joanne Dru, Peter Lawford, Edmond O'Brien, Ann Sothern, Viveca Lindfors, and Aldo Ray.  Ann's appearance is entertaining.  There is some heart in this film, too.  I liked that.

 

8. Gone to Earth (1950) -- This is considered lesser Powell-Pressburger, but I don't think so.  I enjoyed this one.  The film makes the comparison of an earthy young woman and the hunted fox and how men make a sport of the two.  Jennifer Jones plays the girl.  It's the kind of woman Jenny excelled at playing.  The mysterious, enchanting, elusive girl.  Despite her sweetness and innocence, there is something doomed about her.  David Farrar plays a similar character to the one he played in The Archers' Black Narcissus.  Although, I think he's less likable here.

 

9. I Walk Alone (1948) -- Star power goes a long way in this film noir, as Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, and Lizabeth Scott headline.  It's a real treat to see Burt and Kirk doing battle.  As the story goes, Frankie (Burt) is fresh out of doing a prison rap and he's back to assume his share of the business with Kirk.  It's harmonious from here on out. :D  The film features the kind of players you'd expect, Mike Mazurki, Marc Lawrence, and the weasly Wendell Corey.

 

10. Bachelor Mother (1939) -- It's only natural to leap from film noir right to a charming mix-up comedy starring Ginger Rogers and David Niven, right?  This is prime "Ginger", to me.  She's beautiful and funny.  She comes darn close to Carole Lombard when she's right.  And she's right in this picture.  The story is about David (Niven) mistakenly believing Polly (Ginger) is the mother of a baby when she isn't.  Bring on the comedy.  This "mistaken" comedy reminded me of one of my favorite shows, Three's Company.  So it easily connected with me.  And a comedy from this time always goes up with Charles Coburn in the cast.  Arguably the best of his kind.

 

11. All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) -- While this all-time classic didn't register with me as highly as I anticipated, it still scored highly.  I can see how it is regarded as one of the greatest war films ever made.  The ending alone makes the film one of the best.  What a terrific ending.  I also love the set-up at the beginning, the selling of war with idealism.  Just great.  And so very true.  How the film creates a story arc for many of the characters is done exceptionally well.  Lew Ayres is probably viewed as the "star" of the film, but I'd say it's mostly a starless film without a single-character focus.

 

12. City That Never Sleeps (1953) -- So who here thinks a film noir with Gig Young as the lead is going to be any good?  Well, it is.  This one is messy.  Johnny (Gig) -- guys have to be named Johnny or Frankie in film noir -- is on the verge of a major life change, brought about by his lust for "Angel Face" (Mala Powers).  It's always wise to run off with an "Angel Face".  Especially if they are behind the wheel.  And in film noir, "running off" always happens without a hitch.  Helping to make this happy romance occur are Edward Arnold, Marie Windsor, and William Talman.  Yeah, they live up to their reputations.  There is a nice look to the film and the ending has a few high points.

 

13. The Road to Singapore (1931) -- Hope and Crosby meet William Powell in Singapore.  Bill and Bing fight over Myrna Loy and Bob is left with Asta.  Well, maybe not.  This is a Bill Powell flick and one that I enjoyed.  Why?  Well, because Bill plays a super breezy womanizer.  All the women are throwing themselves at him.  Mothers and daughters.  It's on the sexy side.  Eventually, someone gets under his skin.  And, yeah, all of this does happen in Singapore.  He was banished there for being a bad boy.  All good stuff to me.

 

14. The Old Maid (1939) -- Bette Davis and Miriam Hopkins as cousins.  Cousins that love the same man, Clem (George Brent).  Who did you expect with Bette?  With love comes other things.  And with those other things more things can show up.  And so the web is woven.  I like Bette during this time of her career.  Here she's mostly repressed and subdued.  Miriam gets to behave badly.  She's pretty good at it, too.  Yes, this is a woman's picture.  It's one I liked.

 

15. Along the Great Divide (1951) -- A rather underrated western by Raoul Walsh, starring Kirk Douglas.  The film certainly feels very "Walshian".  It's all about the lone guy taking on the world.  Foolish?  Stubborn?  Principled?  Here, Marshal Merrick (Kirk) is seeking a fair trial for "Pop" (Walter Brennan), who is accused of a murder by a cattle king.  Along for the ride is Pop's daughter Ann (Virginia Mayo).  She only complicates the matter as Miss G often does.  As you may imagine, the trek to justice is a challenging one.  Douglas turns in a strong performance, as usual.

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What??? You had all this TIME and you only posted your top 15??? (of your gazilion film list??) ha. :P 

 

(You knew I had to say SOMETHING bad, didn't you, Mr. "Man in the Shadows" ) 

 

But hey! I was glad to read it. You gave us very nice run down. Always worth waiting for.. even if I had to wait.. practically FORever!! :D

 

And wow. The Time Machine came in at #1 for you. That is a bit of a surprise since I don't see you as such a huge sci-fi guy overall. But I am sure the themes (and Yvette!) pushed this over the top for you perhaps. 

 

Of the ones on your list  here,  I think I would be interested in maybe # 3 and 15. (OH.. and I don't think I listed in my comments way back on your original list, but I believe I HAVE seen #14 and Bette did a great job, as I recall) 

 

Any others in your grouping that I have not seen that I should check out??? 

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What??? You had all this TIME and you only posted your top 15??? (of your gazilion film list??) ha. :P

 

I know!  I'm slowing down in my old age.  Slowing way down!  What's pathetic is that it takes me three hours to write about 15 films.

 

But hey! I was glad to read it. You gave us very nice run down. Always worth waiting for.. even if I had to wait.. practically FORever!! :D

 

Thank you.  It's crazy how tough it has been for me to write.

 

And wow. The Time Machine came in at #1 for you. That is a bit of a surprise since I don't see you as such a huge sci-fi guy overall. But I am sure the themes (and Yvette!) pushed this over the top for you perhaps. 

 

I'm also surprised by The Time Machine being my favorite of that group.  I think the mixture of entertaining and through-provoking struck the right chord with me.

 

Of the ones on your list  here,  I think I would be interested in maybe # 3 and 15. (OH.. and I don't think I listed in my comments way back on your original list, but I believe I HAVE seen #14 and Bette did a great job, as I recall) 

 

Yeah, I'd say The Old Maid is one you'd find enough to like.  It's a "mother" flick.  And I agree, I think you'd like Along the Great Divide a bit.  The idea of doing the right thing is a strong theme.  I'm not sure about you going for Ladies of LeisureForbidden is probably one that interest you more because of the dilemma.

 

Any others in your grouping that I have not seen that I should check out???

 

Of that group, I'd say The Enforcer and City That Never Sleeps, two films noir, would be the ones you'd find entertaining.  The films aren't elite, but they are very solid.

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Denotes: film can be found on YouTube.

 

16. Golden Boy (1939) -- A very solid boxing pic made so by the combination of Barbara Stanwyck and William Holden.  It also doesn't hurt that it's written by Clifford Odets, one of my favorite writers.  And this film resembles a later Odets picture, Humoresque.  Both feature musicians who are pushed and pull in directions they are unsure of.  Barbara plays a character very reminiscent of her trademark early-40s pics: the impure-motive dame who finds a heart.  Holden is fresh-faced in his first leading role and Lee J. Cobb is even more over-the-top than usual.

 

17. Flight from Ashiya (1964) -- I was rather surprised by this unheralded picture.  Not only do you get two strong male stars in Yul Brynner and Richard Widmark but you also get three interesting stories.  And for me, it's the stories that really grabbed me.  The film is about an air rescue unit and their past demons.  These demons are presented via flashback.  Yul's story was my favorite.  It's a different kind of love story.  Widmark's deals with personal tragedy and how it shaped his opinions of today.  The third man in the story is George Chakiris.  His story is also rather good.

 

18. The Children's Hour (1961) -- Lillian Hellman's play is presented in a stronger version than the 30s picture, These Three.  While I did enjoy this William Wyler film, I prefer the 30s version because the focus in that film is more on the lies of the student, something I found fascinating.  This film pretty much glosses over the student lies and places a greater emphasis on the relationship between Karen (Audrey Hepburn) and Martha (Shirley MacLaine).  Their relationship is compelling, to be sure.  The 30s version eliminated the homosexuality and made the film simply a competition between two women (Merle Oberon and Miriam Hopkins) for one man (Joel McCrea).  I love the casting of Miriam as the aunt in this version.  A nice nod.  Love Shirley in this film, too.

 

19. Appointment with Danger (1951) -- A solid but unspectacular film noir about a postal inspector (Alan Ladd) who must infiltrate a crime syndicate to solve the murder of a fellow officer.  Films like this benefit from having a lead like Ladd and a supporting cast of film noir favorites, such as Paul Stewart, Jan Sterling, and the Dragnet duo of Jack Webb and Harry Morgan.

 

20. Tea and Sympathy (1956) -- Another film with homosexuality at the forefront but hidden in the shadows.  And this offering is done so with the tenderness the title suggests.  And who better to provide the tea and sympathy than Deborah Kerr?  Deborah delivers a strong performance of conflicted understanding, as she often knows how.  John Kerr plays the young man who is dealing with his feelings of "different".  It's an excellent showing by him.  Just a nice, sensitive film from Vincente Minnelli.

 

21. Kitty Foyle (1940) -- I pretty much enjoyed this "class" romance starring Ginger Rogers.  Once again, I'm taken by Ginger at this stage of her career.  I just love her mix of comedy, romance, and drama.  She ended up winning the Oscar for "Best Actress" for this performance and I can see how.  The drama really gets heavy in this picture and I thought it was quite good.  The ending has a nice kick.

 

22. On the Double (1961) -- Danny Kaye got off to a slow start with me, but he's slowly picking up steam.  When he's simply focusing on comedy and not singing, I like him a good bit.  I think he's brilliant.  This flick was one of my favorites of Kaye.  While Kaye is once again zany fun, it's the presence of Dana Wynter and Diana Dors that helps elevate the film.  Diana is very sexy, but so is Dana.  I didn't know Dana could be this sexy.  Margaret Rutherford also has a funny scene in the pic, too.  What's the film about?  Like many Danny comedies, it's about mistaken identity.  Here, Danny is used as the decoy double for a British colonel.

 

23. A Double Life (1947) -- One of the most interesting and unique of films that I watched in this group.  Ronald Colman plays "Anthony John", a theatrical actor who becomes consumed in his parts.  Eventually, life begins to imitate art, in dangerous ways.  His current role?  Othello.  Yikes.  Colman is the show here and this is arguably his greatest performance.  He is under the microscope throughout.  Pretty much his The Lost Weekend.  And there's something about seeing a cool cat like Colman unravel that makes it all the more unnerving.

 

24. Man with the Gun (1955) -- An underrated Robert Mitchum western.  On the surface, it seems like many westerns.  Mitchum is a gunslinger who is hired by a town to rid it of a power broker running roughshod.  That's very conventional.  But beneath this veneer is a darker tone plus a hidden past that delivers some emotion.  Jan Sterling plays Mitchum's emotionally-burned ex-wife, who is the local madam.  Angie Dickinson is one of her ladies.  Henry Hull and Ted de Corsia add some supporting spice to the film.

 

25. Thunder Over the Plains (1953) -- While this western is mostly "run of the mill", it does highlight the appeal of Randolph Scott.  And for that reason, I enjoyed it.  Scott, like many of these kind of westerns, is placed in charge of protecting government officials in Texas.  Always honorable and dutiful, Scott encounters the other side.  Nothing ground-breaking, story-wise.  What's a bit different is Charles McGraw plays more of a good guy and Lex Barker is a baddie. Barker's advances on Scott's wife (Phyllis Kirk) in the picture are quite uneasy.

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Scott, love these paragraph reviews you do. Very satisfying. It's an art and you have it down.

 

And who better to provide the tea and sympathy than Deborah Kerr?

 

No one. On the Candids thread, a picture of her was posted on her birthday. I wrote a reply that just said, "Deborah!" I don't why that came out but I didn't analyze it, just let it be. Fact is there is something about her on-screen personas that really touches me.

 

==

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And who better to provide the tea and sympathy than Deborah Kerr?

 

No one. On the Candids thread, a picture of her was posted on her birthday. I wrote a reply that just said, "Deborah!" I don't why that came out but I didn't analyze it, just let it be. Fact is there is something about her on-screen personas that really touches me.

 

==

 

There is an elegance to Deborah Kerr. I would also think a softness that not every actress has. Even when she her character has flaws as in "From Here To Eternity" it is hard not to like her. (Of course, it helps that her husband is a pain.)

 

I totally agree about Scott's gift for comments on his movies.

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There is an elegance to Deborah Kerr. I would also think a softness that not every actress has. Even when she her character has flaws as in "From Here To Eternity" it is hard not to like her. (Of course, it helps that her husband is a pain.)

 

I totally agree about Scott's gift for comments on his movies.

 

Interesting that you find a softness in Kerr;  I believe many at this forum has found that she is rather cold,  somewhat like Grace Kelly. 

 

So what some define as elegance is instead viewed as coldness (maybe distance is a better description).    In FHTE her character isn't very warm but this is understandable given her circumstances (that husband is more than just a pain!).  

 

In Tea and Sympathy her character is softer and open.     Kerr was a versatile and gifted actress and we see this in the characters she played.            

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Bonjour, Laffite -- Thank you for the kind words.  Very appreciated.

 

And who better to provide the tea and sympathy than Deborah Kerr?

 

No one. On the Candids thread, a picture of her was posted on her birthday. I wrote a reply that just said, "Deborah!" I don't why that came out but I didn't analyze it, just let it be. Fact is there is something about her on-screen personas that really touches me.

 

She has the same effect on me.  She's dignified and honorable.  She's repressed with longing.  She can also be sexy and funny.  There are many levels for her.  She's the kind of lady I'd enjoy being around.

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Hey there Frank,

 

I agree that your capsule reviews are great. It is always a pleasure to read your thoughts on all these films.

 

My thoughts on your top 25.

 

Well, I'm struck by how many I haven't seen! I mean really, I question my own film buff cred when I have to admit that I haven't got around to watching Golden Boy, The Children's Hour or All's Quiet on the Western Front. At least I don't remember watching any of these. All the noir on your list I either haven't seen or don't remember well enough to comment. Still you are bringing these films to my attention again and I like that. 

 

Also a few films on the list are new to me. I like that too.

   

1. The Time Machine (1960) -- I was pleasantly surprised by the emotion in this sci-fi classic.  I also loved some of the questions the film posed.  Even while the advancement in science and human knowledge grows and grows, there's still something beautiful about a simple life with love.  Ignorance is bliss.  Is it?  Rod Taylor is an actor I enjoy. I like his physicality.  But he plays the smart guy in this one.  I greatly enjoyed Alan Young.  Love "Willlllbur".  I loved his devotion to H. George Wells (Taylor).  I liked the actual time machine.  The quaintness of it.  And there's also the lovely, sweet Yvette Mimieux.  The film really struck a chord with me.

 

As I said before I love this film. I'm a little suprised that it tops your list but I agree with your reasons. I like the quaintness as well. I also liked the cast and the characters they portray. The story is interesting and thoughtful. It is visually appealing. It is just fun to watch.

 

2. Toni (1935) -- What a revelation this film was.  This is a film produced by Marcel Pagnol and directed by Jean Renoir.  I feel it combines elements of both, which helps to make this film a hidden gem.  You will find the rich characters of Pagnol and the existential theme of Renoir.  Love, lust, devotion, betrayal, selfishness, and sacrifice are to be found.  And it's all presented in a humanistic way, as both Pagnol and Renoir are known to be exceptional at doing.

 

I know nothing of this film but I'm going to check it out based on your comments.

 

3. Ladies of Leisure (1930) -- The first pairing of Frank Capra and Barbara Stanwyck was a winner with me.  Barbara's brash party girl collides with a shy artist (Ralph Graves) and an opposites-attract relationship develops.  I just love it when Barbara plays these kind of characters, ala The Lady Eve and Ball of Fire.  The film has some nice dramatic flourishes and I especially liked the ending.  The lack of an interesting male presence works for me in this kind of 30s film since the fella isn't that confident to start with.

 

4. Forbidden (1932) -- Another 30s flick?!  What's wrong with me?! Ahhhh, but it's Capra and Stanwyck, back together again.  Magical.  I'd say this film is a precursor to Now, Voyager!.  The framework is somewhat similar.  But this film digs a lot deeper.  There are some serious dilemmas involved in this one, and how it all plays out is strongly felt.  It certainly raises the question, "what would you do?"  Adolphe Menjou plays Barbara's rendezvous.  I usually don't see Adolphe in such a role, but he was quite good here.

 

I haven't seen either of these in a good while but I have always been big on the Capra/Stanwyck films and remember liking these two. Stanwyck was such a powerful presence right out of the gate. I love her characters and I love watching her in these films. I need to check out these two again. I think Forbidden will be first up.

 

5. BUtterfield 8 (1960) -- From the 30s to Liz Taylor soapy trash?  Huh?  Yeah, well, when soapy trash is done right, I'm for it.  And this one was done right.  In an odd way, this is the trashy version of Breakfast at Tiffany's.  It's dirty and cheap and emotionally strong.  Liz sure knew how to do dirty and cheap and do it with such class and beauty.  She continues to rise with me.  The two men in her life are quite the contrast.  One is a selfish jerk and the other the nice guy.  Laurence Harvey and Eddie Fisher play the men.  I bet you cannot guess who plays who. :D  The supporting cast of Mildred Dunnock, Betty Field, and Dina Merrill are all good.  But Mildred and Betty are the standouts.  Can't say I liked the ending that much, though.

 

At number five this had me on the floor. :) First off I have never seen the film though the premise does interest me. I have never been that interested in Liz Taylor's sixties output to be honest. I think it is the "soapy trash" part that put's me off. That you think highly of it may push me to get around to this one. Maybe. :D

 

10. Bachelor Mother (1939) -- It's only natural to leap from film noir right to a charming mix-up comedy starring Ginger Rogers and David Niven, right?  This is prime "Ginger", to me.  She's beautiful and funny.  She comes darn close to Carole Lombard when she's right.  And she's right in this picture.  The story is about David (Niven) mistakenly believing Polly (Ginger) is the mother of a baby when she isn't.  Bring on the comedy.  This "mistaken" comedy reminded me of one of my favorite shows, Three's Company.  So it easily connected with me.  And a comedy from this time always goes up with Charles Coburn in the cast.  Arguably the best of his kind.

 

I agree this is "prime Ginger". Also agree about Coburn. I really wonderful and funny film.

 

13. The Road to Singapore (1931) -- Hope and Crosby meet William Powell in Singapore.  Bill and Bing fight over Myrna Loy and Bob is left with Asta.  Well, maybe not.  This is a Bill Powell flick and one that I enjoyed.  Why?  Well, because Bill plays a super breezy womanizer.  All the women are throwing themselves at him.  Mothers and daughters.  It's on the sexy side.  Eventually, someone gets under his skin.  And, yeah, all of this does happen in Singapore.  He was banished there for being a bad boy.  All good stuff to me.

 

Ha! Well Powell is another favorite that I just enjoy watching as he works his charm in films like these. I'm with you on this one. I think High Pressure was on this list or maybe another list. I forget at the moment. That is another favorite from this era.

 

14. The Old Maid (1939) -- Bette Davis and Miriam Hopkins as cousins.  Cousins that love the same man, Clem (George Brent).  Who did you expect with Bette?  With love comes other things.  And with those other things more things can show up.  And so the web is woven.  I like Bette during this time of her career.  Here she's mostly repressed and subdued.  Miriam gets to behave badly.  She's pretty good at it, too.  Yes, this is a woman's picture.  It's one I liked.

 

I saw this ages ago and was mainly intrigued by the pairing of Davis and Hopkins. I've always found Hopkins rather fascinating. Like you say she is good at being bad. A good soap opera.

 

21. Kitty Foyle (1940) -- I pretty much enjoyed this "class" romance starring Ginger Rogers.  Once again, I'm taken by Ginger at this stage of her career.  I just love her mix of comedy, romance, and drama.  She ended up winning the Oscar for "Best Actress" for this performance and I can see how.  The drama really gets heavy in this picture and I thought it was quite good.  The ending has a nice kick.

 

I didn't care that much for this one as I recall. I didn't hate it but I think it wore me down. I thought the drama was a little forced here and there. Ginger did get her Oscar though. 

 

I'm looking forward to your rankings of the other films on your list. I'm curious to read your thoughts and I'm sure I'll have more to say on some of those. :)

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This slow process of writing continues. :D

 

Can be found on YouTube

 

26. Arrowhead (1953) -- A surprisingly involved western that finds a conflicted Charlton Heston in the middle of a war between the Cavalry and the Apaches plus affections for two different women.  I enjoyed Heston in this one.  He's quite rebellious.  He's often being pushed and he pushes back pretty strongly.  Katy Jurado plays one of the women he has feelings for.  Do you expect anything less than great emotion with Katy?  She's great.  Brian Keith, who is always a pleasant sight, plays a Cavalry captain who also has his eye on Heston's other love interest, played by Mary Sinclair.  Jack Palance plays the young Apache who is looking to stand his own ground and who has a history with Heston.  There's also Doc (Milburn Stone) from Gunsmoke.  This isn't a top-tier western, but it's an entertaining middle-of-the-road oater.

 

27. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) -- I had high expectations for this iconic sci-fi thriller.  I'd have to say it fell short of those expectations.  Still, it's a quality picture that surely deserves its lofty standing.  There really is something creepy about those pods.  I also liked the paranoid atmosphere.  It was all very unnerving.  But I do prefer It Came From Outer Space much more.  A film I feel is similar.

 

28. The Gazebo (1959) -- Molo's suggestion was a pretty good one.  It's a black comedy that mostly hits more than misses.  The film almost plays like a twisted Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House.  Very odd.  Glenn Ford is the star of the show.  He plays a writer who is being blackmailed and this leads to some funny and even disturbing situations.  Debbie Reynolds plays Glenn's wife and Carl Reiner, who is excellent, plays his best friend.  And then there is Herman the Pigeon.  Surreal!

 

29. The Sleeping Tiger (1954) -- I came to this Joseph Losey film because I have it in a cheap PD DVD box set and because I wanted to watch some Alexis Smith.  It turned out to be a worthwhile exploration.  The film has an uneasy feel throughout, one of "what are you doing?" and "this ain't gonna end well".  As the story goes, Dirk Bogarde plays a young convict whom psychologist Alexander Knox feels he can rehabilitate.  So what's Knox's brilliant idea?  He'll take him into his home.  He invites the troubled, handsome young man into his home with his wife, played by Alexis.  I'm sure you can figure out that Alexis has her own issues.  Yeah, it's messy.

 

30. Psyche 59 (1964) -- Speaking of messy, this one is hazardous.  Trauma-induced blindness is at the forefront of the film.  What's the trauma?  That's the mystery.  Patricia Neal is the blind woman at the center of the storm.  As usual, she's terrific.  Curd Jurgens, another strong performer, plays her husband who has his eye on Samantha Eggar, who is Patricia's younger sister.  Yeah, it's on the lascivious side.

 

31. Ruthless (1948) -- Many films have been made about the ladder-climbing woman.  But how about the man?  Well, this Edgar G. Ulmer flick is just that.  Zachary Scott is our ambitious "hero" and he's not gonna stop until he has everything he wants.  The women who encounter good ol' Zach are Diana Lynn, Martha Vickers, and Lucille Bremer.  Rounding out the strong supporting cast are Sydney Greenstreet, Raymond Burr, and Louis Hayward.  I liked the ending to this one.  And who plays a snake better than Zachary?

 

32. Lady on a Train (1945) -- A film noir starring Deanna Durbin?  And it has Edward Everett Horton?  This has to be a cutesy mystery.  And yeah, it has some elements of that.  But what really surprised me was that there's a deadly feel to it, as well.  Even though the title of the film suggests a film like The Lady Vanishes or Strangers on a Train it's really more like Rear Window.  What really helps elevate the film is the presence of Dan Duryea, Ralph Bellamy, and Allen Jenkins.  Yeah, it's a mish-mash, but it all worked for me.

 

33. Beware of Pity (1946) -- Miss Goddess suggested this film to me and I enjoyed it.  It's a British picture starring Lilli Palmer as a paralyzed young woman who is struggling with her desires and reality.  It's something so many of us deal with, even outside of a disability.  The film captures the pain of longing for love so beautifully.  It also captures the want to make someone with a disability happy that it can sometimes create other issues.  Lilli's parents are played by veterans Cedric Hardwicke and Gladys Cooper.  The man of Lilli's affection is Albert Lieven, a guy I'm unfamiliar with.

 

34. One Touch of Venus (1948) -- It's Xanadu before Xanadu!  Also Mannequin of the 80s. And it stars one of my very favorites: Ava Gardner.  Yeah, I know, the boyish Robert Walker, who is the lead in this film, isn't a favorite of too many.  But I was okay with him in this lighthearted fantasy pic.  But make no mistake, this film is all about Ava and her seductive beauty.  She's as beautiful as ever in this film.  What's the film about?  A statue of Venus comes to life in the form of Ava Gardner and Walker immediately is smitten.  Can such a fantasy remain a reality? Does it matter?!

 

35. Strangers in the Night (1944) -- A very early Anthony Mann film that is intriguing but not all the way fulfilling.  Yet again, this is another film dealing with fantasy and reality.  In this case, it's haunting.  The film plays as a nightmare more than anything.  But there's a great deal of sadness to be found, too.  The story is about a woman (Helene Thimig) who starts a pen-pal relationship with a soldier (William Terry).  Things start to get close and then...

 

36. Flamingo Road (1949) -- It's Joan Crawford and Zachary Scott, back together again.  I'm sure they are going to find better luck than in Mildred Pierce.  Right?  In a way, this film reminds me of Touch of Evil.  Now it doesn't have the seedy, sweaty look of Orson Welles' magnificent film noir, but it does have a similar character, a power struggle, and a feeling of desperation.  In a classic kind of role for Joan, she plays a dancer who gets bounced around due to circumstance.  She faces ups and downs throughout.  Her biggest stumbling block is Sheriff Titus Semple, played by the impeccable Sydney Greenstreet.  It's one of the best performances for Greenstreet, which is saying a lot.  He's certainly memorable.

 

37. Way of a Gaucho (1952) -- Jacques Tourneur summons Victor Hugo's "Les Miserables" in this "hunted man" adventure film.  Rory Calhoun is the man on the run from the law and Richard Boone is the Law.  Any film with Boone in such a great role is worthwhile to me.  Love Boone.  And here I am, five sentences in, and I still haven't mentioned Gene Tierney.  Sacrilege!  Gene is beautiful, as she always is.  Then there is the location of the film.  Argentina.  That adds to the beauty in the picture.  So with all these winning elements going on, why didn't I like it more?  The story is just a little short for me.  I wasn't fond of the ending, either.  It's a Quiet Gal ending.  Nooooooooooooooooooooooooo!

 

38. The Thief (1952) -- A highly unique film in that it's one without dialogue.  This helps create a serious atmosphere, one of great paranoia.  And since the film is about the Cold War, it makes the paranoia work all the more.  So does the story match the atmosphere?  Not with me.  It just never rises to the mood.  But oh that mood!  And the location shooting is also superb.  Ray Milland is the star of film.  He plays a nuclear physicist who is on the take.

 

39. Fraulein (1958) -- Dana Wynter is given a strong role and she delivers a fine performance in this film about the aftermath of World War II.  Dana plays "Erika Angermann", a woman who helps a U.S. soldier (Mel Ferrer) evade the Nazis during the war.  Her life from that point would turn to one of survival.  A chance encounter then reunites her with the soldier she once saved.  Will he need to save her now?

 

40. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) -- This beloved film by the Archers (Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger) didn't resonate as strongly with me.  I think it's because I'm rarely fond of the "life and death" pictures; films that span a lifetime of a character.  There are definitely scenes and moments in this film that I greatly enjoyed.  I particularly loved Deborah Kerr and her multiple incarnations.  That was genius.  There's some truth about us having a certain "type" or being drawn to similarities with people.  Such a nice take on that.  I also enjoy the commentary on generational views.  How we all are young and disdainful of the older generation until we find ourselves being the older generation.  Roger Livesey is, of course, brilliant in the lead role of "Clive 'Sugar' Candy".  A wonderful performance.  And the film truly is lovely.

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Hey there, Grahame's Guy -- I agree that your capsule reviews are great. It is always a pleasure to read your thoughts on all these films.

 

Thank you.  And it's great to have you around to discuss the films with.  Always a pleasure.

 

Well, I'm struck by how many I haven't seen! I mean really, I question my own film buff cred when I have to admit that I haven't got around to watching Golden Boy, The Children's Hour or All's Quiet on the Western Front. At least I don't remember watching any of these. All the noir on your list I either haven't seen or don't remember well enough to comment. Still you are bringing these films to my attention again and I like that. 

 

Ha!  No need to question your classic cred.  You're legit.  Even I'm getting to the legit level.  I've definitely come a long way since I first joined this board in 2007.  And it's because of you and others on this board that I've been able to broaden my knowledge.

 

As I said before I love this film. I'm a little suprised that it tops your list but I agree with your reasons. I like the quaintness as well. I also liked the cast and the characters they portray. The story is interesting and thoughtful. It is visually appealing. It is just fun to watch.

 

I'm also surprised it tops my list!  I would not have guessed that, myself.  I think the film hit me just right.  I like that it made me think and feel.

 

I know nothing of this film but I'm going to check it out based on your comments.

 

I'd be curious to see what your thoughts would be of Toni.  It's completely a "Jackie" pic.  I think she'd enjoy it.

 

I haven't seen either of these in a good while but I have always been big on the Capra/Stanwyck films and remember liking these two. Stanwyck was such a powerful presence right out of the gate. I love her characters and I love watching her in these films. I need to check out these two again. I think Forbidden will be first up.

 

I've been impressed by the emotion found in these Capra/Stanwyck films.  I think that's what I like most about Capra.  He makes highly emotional social commentaries.  Not everyone can reach his level of emotion with such topics.

 

At number five this had me on the floor. :) First off I have never seen the film though the premise does interest me. I have never been that interested in Liz Taylor's sixties output to be honest. I think it is the "soapy trash" part that put's me off. That you think highly of it may push me to get around to this one. Maybe. :D

 

I would say BUtterfield 8 isn't for you.  It's very soapy trash and Liz is playing a lost soul in her "Liz" way.  I actually love Liz when she's this way.  I'm a big fan of her 60s work... thus far.  She's so combative.  She makes Miss G seem like an angel.

 

I agree this is "prime Ginger". Also agree about Coburn. I really wonderful and funny film.

 

Definitely.  Coburn is always so much fun.  Well, except Kings Row and In This Our Life. :D

 

Ha! Well Powell is another favorite that I just enjoy watching as he works his charm in films like these. I'm with you on this one. I think High Pressure was on this list or maybe another list. I forget at the moment. That is another favorite from this era.

 

I believe High Pressure was on the list before this one.  That's a different kind of Powell pic.  Pretty interesting.  It's almost like he was playing a Warren William character.

 

I saw this ages ago and was mainly intrigued by the pairing of Davis and Hopkins. I've always found Hopkins rather fascinating. Like you say she is good at being bad. A good soap opera.

 

I usually like Miriam.  She can be such a troublemaker and a handful.  Then she can be a peach, such as These Three.

 

I didn't care that much for this one as I recall. I didn't hate it but I think it wore me down. I thought the drama was a little forced here and there. Ginger did get her Oscar though.

 

I know others feel the same about Kitty Foyle.  I enjoyed the "kicks to the gut" Ginger faced.  I was surprised to see her facing such things.

 

I'm looking forward to your rankings of the other films on your list. I'm curious to read your thoughts and I'm sure I'll have more to say on some of those.

 

I hope you do!

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I know how ridiculously long this list of films I have watched is.  If you find any on the list you wish to comment on, please do.

 

Above Suspicion (1943)

Adam Had Four Sons (1941)

An American in Paris (1951)

The Arrangement (1969)

Beach Party (1963)

The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend (1949)

Blonde Crazy (1931)

The Brasher Doubloon (1947)

Buffalo Bill (1944)

Chad Hanna (1940)

The Charge of the Light Brigade (1936)

Charlie Chan in Rio (1941)

A Child Is Waiting (1963)

China Gate (1957)

China Girl (1942)

The Cincinnati Kid (1965)

City of Bad Men (1953)

The Criminal Code (1931)

Dark City (1950)

Dark Hazard (1934)

Deception (1946)

Dust Be My Destiny (1939)

Elephant Walk (1954)

Escape (1948)

Fantastic Voyage (1966)

The Flame and the Arrow (1950)

Footlight Parade (1933)

Frankie and Johnny (1966)

The Front Page (1931)

The Greeks Had a Word for Them (1932)

Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957)

Guys and Dolls (1955)

Hamlet (1948)

Harper (1966)

Has Anybody Seen My Gal (1952)

Hit the Ice (1943)

Hold Your Man (1933)

Honeymoon in Bali (1939)

Hot Blood (1956)

Hud (1963)

The Idol (1966)

Invisible Ghost (1941)

Irma la Douce (1963)

The Iron Curtain (1948)

Jeanne Eagels (1957)

Jessica (1962)

Judgment at Nuremberg (1961)

The Key (1934)

Kid Galahad (1937)

Lady by Choice (1934)

Lady for a Night (1942)

Le Bonheur (1965)

The List of Adrian Messenger (1963)

Mackenna's Gold (1969)

The Madwoman of Chaillot (1969)

Millie (1931)

The Miracle Woman (1931)

Mutiny (1952)

My Friend Irma (1949)

Never So Few (1959)

A New Kind of Love (1963)

A Night to Remember (1942)

Nob Hill (1945)

No Man of Her Own (1950)

Ocean's Eleven (1960)

Our Betters (1933)

Petulia (1968)

The Phantom Creeps (1939)

Ride Beyond Vengeance (1966)

Right Cross (1950)

The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (1961)

Romeo and Juliet (1936)

Room at the Top (1959)

Rope of Sand (1949)

Scene of the Crime (1949)

The Second Face (1950)

Sex and the Single Girl (1964)

Shadow of Chinatown (1936)

She Done Him Wrong (1933)

Shipmates (1931)

The Sound of Music (1965)

Splendor in the Grass (1961)

Strangers May Kiss (1931)

Summer and Smoke (1961)

Summer with Monika (1953)

Support Your Local Sheriff! (1969)

Susan Slade (1961)

Sweet Bird of Youth (1962)

Ten Little Indians (1965)

This Above All (1942)

The Thomas Crown Affair (1968)

Three Secrets (1950)

Too Young to Kiss (1951)

Trial (1955)

Twisted Nerve (1968)

A Very Special Favor (1965)

Vigil in the Night (1940)

Walk on the Wild Side (1962)

Westbound (1959)

West Side Story (1961)

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Man, you have been busy. How long to get through this list? I admire your dedication.

 

I'll keep a few comments short. (Though I always do much better responding to yours.) I have seen many of these but for some it has been a long time. But for others there are some memorable things....

 

An American in Paris - some first rate dancing going on here. Whatever one thinks of the underlying story the dancing is to be admired and enjoyed.

 

Footlight Parade - is where I first saw Cagney dance. I knew the gangster Cagney and read he could dance but had not seen it before this one. Can't say I remember much of the movie but thought he could dance pretty well. He certainly had his own style.

 

Gunfight At The OK Corral - we've talked about this one and I've always enjoyed it. It's not "Shane" or "The Searchers" but it is good sold entertainment.

 

Guys and Dolls - didn't care much for Brando here but thought the sets and all those colors were novel. I love Jean Simmons.

 

Judgement At Nuremburg - is a big undertaking, maybe too big. Tracy, Schell, Widmark, for a start, give fine performances. I thought some of the Dietrich segment might not be needed but it has been a long time since I've seen it.

 

The List of Adrian Messenger - is a pretty good drama in spite of its gimmick. That part of it was the only drawback as the makeup was so over the top.

 

Support Your Local Sheriff - one of my favorite comedies. It certainly helps to find Jack Elam was a riot. With Brennan playing against type and the ever affable Garner in the lead it's fun from the opening right through Elam's postscript. "Pooberty."

 

Westbound - this one really needed Burt Kennedy. It's not that it's awful but that it is just another routine western. Bonus points for Karen Steele.

 

West Side Story - innovative choreography and glorious music overcome a very broad style of acting that seems more suited to its stage origin than on film. The best part was taking my daughter to see it in the theater a few years ago.

 

...but enough from me.

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I know how ridiculously long this list of films I have watched is.  If you find any on the list you wish to comment on, please do.

 

The Thomas Crown Affair (1968)

 

 

This is one of my all-time favorite movies! It is excellent on many levels. It is two very strong personalities dealing with the weakness of falling in love and having to work very hard to maintain their personas. I love in particular that it did not wimp-out with Hollywood ending. Each stayed true to their persona despite being deeply in love. The ending is such a surprise because there seems to be two options but they did a third we did not suspect. It is perfection!

 

I do think it is biggest mistake that any woman could ever make would be to have priorities other than running away with Steve McQueen and millions of dollars cash.

 

 

 

Fantastic Voyage (1966)

 

 

I like this very much. It is based on I. Asimov story. The graphics are amazing for the era.

 

 

 

The Greeks Had a Word for Them (1932)

 

 

Ina Claire is a delight in this and Joan Blondell is at her best.

 

 

 

The List of Adrian Messenger (1963)

 

 

I like this very much for a number of reasons. I see great faults in it but the whole overcomes them. I believe the removal of cutesy items and a stronger lead would have made it wonderful movie.

 

 

 

The Madwoman of Chaillot (1969)

 

 

I find this a wonderful movie! It may be a little longer than need be but the character interactions are quite powerful. The cast is perfect in their roles.

 

 

 

Summer with Monika (1953)

 

 

I like this very much. Performances are very powerful.

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I know how ridiculously long this list of films I have watched is.  If you find any on the list you wish to comment on, please do.


 


WOO! Ridiculously long is RIGHT. ha. But I love your lists. They are a sign to me that at least ONE thing in this mixed up, messed up, whacked out world will always stay the same. ha. It is fun to read through all the many titles and try to guess which ones you liked. (though in truth I just have to wait for you to tell me on most of them because (at least over the last couple of years) you have been WAY out of my realm of knowledge for most of them. ha. (many I would have never even heard of were it not for you.) 


 


At least I have seen (and/or READ) a few of the titles you listed this time. 


 


An American in Paris (1951)  It's ok. But not a huge fave for me w/ Gene Kelly. 


 


Beach Party (1963)  YOU watched a Frankie and Annette movie?? ha. I know I have seen this one (because who HASN'T seen Frankie and Annette) but I would not be able to say much other than... you know.. It's Frankie and Annette. ha. I am sure this one is pretty much the same as the others. (if you've seen one, you've seen them all. more or less) ha. I bet it has Frankie and Annette.. probably some dancing, and kissing.. and there is a beach. ha. (Ok.. so I enjoyed them as a kid, but would probably take a pass now, ha) 


 


A Child Is Waiting (1963) Not your typical Judy movie. Have not seen it but once (and that was a few years ago) Can't recall TOO much, but do remember it being very emotional. 


 


Fantastic Voyage (1966)  Meh. Not so fantastic to ME. ha (that probably means you LOVED this one, doesn't it. ha) :D


 


Guys and Dolls (1955)  I always enjoy this one... though not so much for Jean and Marlon Brando. I love all the OTHER characters though. Fun film, overall. 


 


Hamlet (1948) Have not seen THIS version of the story, but have read it (in High School) and also have seen it in other versions over the years. Not my tippy top favorite for Shakespeare but STILL a very excellent tale. (tragic.. so tragic. I bet you loved the ending. ha) 


 


Judgment at Nuremberg (1961 I know I have seen this film but it has been WAY too long for me to comment on it. 


 


A Night to Remember (1942)  Very good rendition of the tragic tale. (way better than the big, ginormous, ridiculously BORING blockbuster version that came out several years back.. except.. ok the special effects in Titanic WERE pretty cool.. but that is where it starts and stops for me. ha. ANTR is a much better film. 


 


No Man of Her Own (1950)  I THINK I have seen this one.. but agh. I don't remember much about it, other than the synopsis I read online tonight was very familiar. 


 


Romeo and Juliet (1936)  Again. another that I have READ (and also saw a different version, not the 30's) The film that I saw was not so good as just reading it for myself. Don't know how the 1936 version would compare. (again.. ha.. tragedy, tragedy, tragedy.. right  up your alley. I am sure. ha) 


 


The Sound of Music (1965)  I predict you HATED it. ha. (but that is only because it has always been one that I have enjoyed. We found the vhs tape at a garage sale a couple of years ago (for a DOLLAR!) and the kidling loves to watch it. 


 


Support Your Local Sheriff! (1969)  PERFECT movie for Garner.. he did a great job. (loved Jack Elam too, and Joan Hackett was hilarious) Pretty fun movie overall, as I recall, but would have to see it again to say much more.) 


 


Ten Little Indians (1965)  Don't think I have seen the movie, but I DID read the book. EVERY body is the killler.  (if I recall) Not my most favorite for Agatha Christie. But then she has a lot of stories, and some I like better than others, but in truth I have only read (or seen the films) for a handful. 


 


West Side Story (1961)  Romeo and Juliet.. with singing and dancing. ha. VERY good film just for the singing and dancing. Can't say it is my most favorite musical ever.. but still a really fine film, if you want to just to sit back and be amazed at all the talent that went into making it. 


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