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JakeHolman

SCIENCE, NATURE, HISTORY & CULTURE

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my levenhuk wise plus 8x32 monocular came in the mail today. that's kinda science and nature related.

:D

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https://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2018/06/22/researchers-figure-out-why-coffee-is-good-for-the-heart/#7132353b56b7

Researchers Figure Out Why Coffee Is Good For The Heart

 
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In an encouraging development in the coffee-may-be-good-for-us field, researchers have discovered at least part of why coffee appears to be beneficial for the heart. In recent years, coffee has moved off the “avoid” list and onto the “drink in moderation” list, as it seems to confer health benefits ranging from brain to metabolic to anticancer to cardiac. The new study, from Heinrich-Heine-University and the IUF-Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine in Germany, finds that coffee may be beneficial in part because caffeine sets off a cascade of events in heart cells, starting with their energy stores, mitochondria, and ending with protection of both healthy and unhealthy hearts.

The findings were published in the journal PLOS Biology.

The team focused on a protein called p27, which is known among other things to influence the cell cycle. The team found that caffeine triggered the movement of p27 into the mitochondria of heart cells in mice, and in particular, the migration of the heart’s endothelial cells, which line the blood vessels. How well the endothelial cells were able to migrate, they found, relied strongly on the presence of p27, which again is bolstered by caffeine. 

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https://bgr.com/2018/06/25/nasa-juno-photo-junocam-storms/

NASA showcases gorgeous new photo of Jupiter that looks almost too amazing to be real

Man, Jupiter sure is weird. The gas giant is one of the most-photographed objects in our Solar System thanks to its mesmerizing, swirling cloud tops, but NASA’s latest photo of the colossal planet is even more jaw-dropping than usual.

The photo, which was taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft, has everything you want to see in a Jupiter close-up. There’s massive cyclones, gorgeous color contrast, and lots of detail hiding within every one of the spiraling storm clouds. It’s images like this that should make everyone very happy that NASA extended Juno’s mission instead of allowing it to plunge to a fiery death in Jupiter’s atmosphere.

As NASA explains in a blog post showing off the photo, the image was captured at a distance of approximately 9,600 miles above the planet’s cloud tops. That might seem like a huge distance, but the planet is so massive that there’s still plenty to see.

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https://phys.org/news/2018-06-scientists-mechanism-proliferation-cancer-cells.html

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Scientists discover a new mechanism that prevents the proliferation of cancer cells

Canadian researchers have discovered a new and direct molecular mechanism to stop cancer cells from proliferating. In the prestigious journal Nature Cell Biology, scientists from Université de Montréal show that a disruption of a fine balance in the composition of ribosomes (huge molecules that translate the genetic code into proteins) results in a shutdown of cancer cell proliferation, triggering a process called senescence.

"Ribosomes are complex machines composed of both RNAs and proteins that make all the proteins necessary for cells to grow," said UdeM biochemistry professor Gerardo Ferbeyre, the study's senior author. Cancer cells grow and proliferate relentlessly and thus require a massive amount of ribosomes, he explained. Growing cells must coordinate the production of both ribosomal RNAs and ribosomal proteins in order to assemble them together in strict proportion to each other.

"We were surprised, however, to find that if the production of ribosomal RNA-protein proportions are driven out of balance in a cancer cell, proliferation can be shut down by in a very simple and direct manner," said Ferbeyre.



 

 

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https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-44603120

Japan's Hayabusa 2 spacecraft reaches cosmic 'diamond'

A Japanese spacecraft has arrived at its target - an asteroid shaped like a diamond or, according to some, a spinning top.

Hayabusa 2 has been travelling toward the space rock Ryugu since launching from the Tanegashima spaceport in 2014.

It is on a quest to study the object close-up and deliver rocks and soil from Ryugu to Earth.

It will use explosives to propel a projectile into Ryugu, digging out a fresh sample from beneath the surface.

Dr Makoto Yoshikawa, Hayabusa 2's mission manager, talked about the plan now that the spacecraft had arrived at its destination.

"At first, we will study very carefully the surface features. Then we will select where to touch down. Touchdown means we get the surface material," he told me.

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https://bigthink.com/mit-news/mit-scientists-discover-fundamental-rule-of-brain-plasticity

MIT scientists discover fundamental rule of brain plasticity

Study reveals how, when a synapse strengthens, its neighbors weaken. 


Our brains are famously flexible, or “plastic,” because neurons can do new things by forging new or stronger connections with other neurons. But if some connections strengthen, neuroscientists have reasoned, neurons must compensate lest they become overwhelmed with input. In a new study in Science, researchers at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at MIT demonstrate for the first time how this balance is struck: when one connection, called a synapse, strengthens, immediately neighboring synapses weaken based on the action of a crucial protein called Arc.

Senior author Mriganka Sur said he was excited but not surprised that his team discovered a simple, fundamental rule at the core of such a complex system as the brain, where 100 billion neurons each have thousands of ever-changing synapses. He likens it to how a massive school of fish can suddenly change direction, en masse, so long as the lead fish turns and every other fish obeys the simple rule of following the fish right in front of it.

“Collective behaviors of complex systems always have simple rules,” says Sur, the Paul E. and Lilah Newton Professor of Neuroscience in the Picower Institute and the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT. “When one synapse goes up, within 50 micrometers there is a decrease in the strength of other synapses using a well-defined molecular mechanism.”

This finding, he said, provides an explanation of how synaptic strengthening and weakening combine in neurons to produce plasticity.

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https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/weeds-are-winning-the-war-against-herbicide-resistance1/

Weeds Are Winning the War against Herbicide Resistance

Herbicides are under evolutionary threat. Can modern agriculture find a new way to fight back?

6BCEEBB9-3F14-4CF0-BCF655C37B20FA3A.jpg?

For farmers, protecting fields from pests and plagues is a constant battle fought on multiple fronts. Many insects have a taste for the same plants humans do, and pathogenic microbes infect leaves, shoots and roots. Then there are the weeds that compete with crops for soil and sun.

Although academics and companies are looking for technical alternativessuch as sprays made from biological compounds, a recent review by researchers at North Carolina State University cautions that society may not be able to science its way out of this thorny problem. There is a “considerable chance,” the authors write, “that the evolution of pest resistance will outpace human innovation.” Addressing the situation requires a collective effort between funding agencies, regulators, farmers and others, the authors add in the review, published in Science. “We need to approach things from more than a single technical fix,” says co-author Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC State. While regulatory action seems unlikely to happen anytime soon at the federal level, several efforts are underway to figure out how to tackle the problem.

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1 hour ago, Gershwin fan said:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/weeds-are-winning-the-war-against-herbicide-resistance1/

Weeds Are Winning the War against Herbicide Resistance

Herbicides are under evolutionary threat. Can modern agriculture find a new way to fight back?

6BCEEBB9-3F14-4CF0-BCF655C37B20FA3A.jpg?

For farmers, protecting fields from pests and plagues is a constant battle fought on multiple fronts. Many insects have a taste for the same plants humans do, and pathogenic microbes infect leaves, shoots and roots. Then there are the weeds that compete with crops for soil and sun.

Although academics and companies are looking for technical alternativessuch as sprays made from biological compounds, a recent review by researchers at North Carolina State University cautions that society may not be able to science its way out of this thorny problem. There is a “considerable chance,” the authors write, “that the evolution of pest resistance will outpace human innovation.” Addressing the situation requires a collective effort between funding agencies, regulators, farmers and others, the authors add in the review, published in Science. “We need to approach things from more than a single technical fix,” says co-author Jennifer Kuzma, co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC State. While regulatory action seems unlikely to happen anytime soon at the federal level, several efforts are underway to figure out how to tackle the problem.

th?id=OIP.v_94HmHsFmjDgnRmWBVdowHaFj

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http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PO1806/S00336/fluoridation-is-mass-medication-nz-supreme-court-rules.htm

Fluoridation is mass medication, NZ Supreme Court rules

Water fluoridation is compulsory mass medication, in breach of human rights, the Supreme Court has ruled by a majority vote. It confirmed that fluoridation is a medical treatment as claimed by opponents for over 60 years. It is not a supplement “just topping up natural levels”, as claimed by the Ministry of Health.

The impracticality of avoiding fluoridated water makes it compulsory in practice, the majority also ruled.

Three judges held that there was conflicting scientific evidence, confirming that the science is NOT settled.

Chief Justice Sian Elias then held that fluoridation was not prescribed by law (i.e. is unlawful), applying section 6 of the Bill of Rights Act. That was the correct decision in Fluoride Free NZ’s view.

The rest of the majority held that it was prescribed by law, and it was then necessary to apply a balancing test to determine if the breach of the right - not to be subject to medical treatment without consent - was justified in the case of fluoridation.

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45 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PO1806/S00336/fluoridation-is-mass-medication-nz-supreme-court-rules.htm

Fluoridation is mass medication, NZ Supreme Court rules

Water fluoridation is compulsory mass medication, in breach of human rights, the Supreme Court has ruled by a majority vote. It confirmed that fluoridation is a medical treatment as claimed by opponents for over 60 years. It is not a supplement “just topping up natural levels”, as claimed by the Ministry of Health.

The impracticality of avoiding fluoridated water makes it compulsory in practice, the majority also ruled.

Three judges held that there was conflicting scientific evidence, confirming that the science is NOT settled.

Chief Justice Sian Elias then held that fluoridation was not prescribed by law (i.e. is unlawful), applying section 6 of the Bill of Rights Act. That was the correct decision in Fluoride Free NZ’s view.

The rest of the majority held that it was prescribed by law, and it was then necessary to apply a balancing test to determine if the breach of the right - not to be subject to medical treatment without consent - was justified in the case of fluoridation.

 

Plus flouride in toothpaste, mouthwashes, etc.  This is one of the most TOXIC chemicals ever pushed on the human race..

Big Berkey Water Systems will get rid of it plus many other chemicals.

Big-Berkey-in-Box.jpg

 

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2 minutes ago, hamradio said:

 

Plus flouride in toothpaste, mouthwashes, etc.  This is one of the most TOXIC chemicals ever pushed on the human race..

Big Berkey Water Systems will get rid of it plus many other chemicals.

Big-Berkey-in-Box.jpg

 

The water should be pure without all the other chemicals in it. I think the court made a really bad judgement.

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