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SCIENCE, NATURE, HISTORY & CULTURE


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https://aeon.co/ideas/think-everyone-died-young-in-ancient-societies-think-again

Think everyone died young in ancient societies? Think again

Anglo-Saxon burial site at the Barrow Clump, Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire. <em>Photo Rexfeatures</em>
Anglo-Saxon burial site at the Barrow Clump, Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire. Photo Rexfeatures

You might have seen the cartoon: two cavemen sitting outside their cave knapping stone tools. One says to the other: ‘Something’s just not right – our air is clean, our water is pure, we all get plenty of exercise, everything we eat is organic and free-range, and yet nobody lives past 30.’

This cartoon reflects a very common view of ancient lifespans, but it is based on a myth. People in the past were not all dead by 30. Ancient documents confirm this. In the 24th century BCE, the Egyptian Vizier Ptahhotep wrote verses about the disintegrations of old age. The ancient Greeks classed old age among the divine curses, and their tombstones attest to survival well past 80 years. Ancient artworks and figurines also depict elderly people: stooped, flabby, wrinkled.

This is not the only type of evidence, however. Studies on extant traditional people who live far away from modern medicines and markets, such as Tanzania’s Hadza or Brazil’s Xilixana Yanomami, have demonstrated that the most likely age at death is far higher than most people assume: it’s about 70 years old. One study found that although there are differences in rates of death in various populations and periods, especially with regards to violence, there is a remarkable similarity between the mortality profiles of various traditional peoples.

So it seems that humans evolved with a characteristic lifespan. Mortality rates in traditional populations are high during infancy, before decreasing sharply to remain constant till about 40 years, then mortality rises to peak at about 70. Most individuals remain healthy and vigorous right through their 60s or beyond, until senescence sets in, which is the physical decline where if one cause fails to kill, another will soon strike the mortal blow

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https://www.rt.com/usa/433449-plutonium-radioactive-stolen-missing/

Nuclear material stolen a year ago still missing, police give up search – report

US authorities have been accused of hushing up an incident in which officials lost plutonium and cesium samples after their car was looted. Police have long-since given up on efforts to locate the nukes, a new report says.

The security experts from the Idaho laboratory were in Texas to take dangerous radioactive materials from a non-profit research lab in the area. For that purpose, they’d brought tiny disks containing plutonium and cesium with them, for calibration.

However, when the two had retired to their hotel rooms for the night, the car they left in the parking lot was raided. When they returned in the morning, their rented Ford Expedition's windows were shattered and the nuclear materials gone.

An immediate police investigation, assisted by the FBI, failed to produce any clues as to the whereabouts of the stolen radioactive materials.

Police have not come up with any clear fingerprints on or inside the car, nor they were able to retrieve any usable surveillance footage. On top of that, law enforcement also failed to find any witnesses to the crime.

While the disappearance of highly hazardous substances under murky circumstances could have made national news, the incident has never been reported before, as police did not publicly disclose details about the case.

They have also refused to specify the amount of plutonium and cesium that was taken from the car. The only indication came from the Idaho lab spokesperson Sarah Neumann, who assured investigators that the quantity stolen is too scant to be used to make a nuclear bomb.

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1 hour ago, Gershwin fan said:

https://www.rt.com/usa/433449-plutonium-radioactive-stolen-missing/

Nuclear material stolen a year ago still missing, police give up search – report

US authorities have been accused of hushing up an incident in which officials lost plutonium and cesium samples after their car was looted. Police have long-since given up on efforts to locate the nukes, a new report says.

The security experts from the Idaho laboratory were in Texas to take dangerous radioactive materials from a non-profit research lab in the area. For that purpose, they’d brought tiny disks containing plutonium and cesium with them, for calibration.

However, when the two had retired to their hotel rooms for the night, the car they left in the parking lot was raided. When they returned in the morning, their rented Ford Expedition's windows were shattered and the nuclear materials gone.

An immediate police investigation, assisted by the FBI, failed to produce any clues as to the whereabouts of the stolen radioactive materials.

Police have not come up with any clear fingerprints on or inside the car, nor they were able to retrieve any usable surveillance footage. On top of that, law enforcement also failed to find any witnesses to the crime.

While the disappearance of highly hazardous substances under murky circumstances could have made national news, the incident has never been reported before, as police did not publicly disclose details about the case.

They have also refused to specify the amount of plutonium and cesium that was taken from the car. The only indication came from the Idaho lab spokesperson Sarah Neumann, who assured investigators that the quantity stolen is too scant to be used to make a nuclear bomb.

 

Suspect #1

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G08IW.jpg

:P

 

 

  • Haha 1
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