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LewRockwell.com

anti-stateanti-warpro-market

 

The Temporary Collapse Of Texas Is Foreshadowing The Total Collapse Of The United States

By Michael Snyder

The Economic Collapse

February 20, 2021

We are getting a very short preview of what will eventually happen to the United States as a whole.  America’s infrastructure is aging and crumbling.  Our power grids were never intended to support so many people, our water systems are a complete joke, and it has become utterly apparent that we would be completely lost if a major long-term national emergency ever struck.  Texas has immense wealth and vast energy resources, but now it is being called a “failed state”.  If it can’t even handle a few days of cold weather, what is the rest of America going to look like when things really start to get chaotic in this country?

At this point, it has become clear that the power grid in Texas is in far worse shape than anyone ever imagined.  When extremely cold weather hit the state, demand for energy surged dramatically.  At the same time, about half of the wind turbines that Texas relies upon froze, and the rest of the system simply could not handle the massive increase in demand.

Millions of Texans were without power for days, and hundreds of thousands are still without power as I write this article.

And now we are learning that Texas was literally just moments away from “a catastrophic failure” that could have resulted in blackouts “for months”

 

Texas’ power grid was “seconds and minutes” away from a catastrophic failure that could have left Texans in the dark for months, officials with the entity that operates the grid said Thursday.

As millions of customers throughout the state begin to have power restored after days of massive blackouts, officials with the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, or ERCOT, which operates the power grid that covers most of the state, said Texas was dangerously close to a worst-case scenario: uncontrolled blackouts across the state.

I can’t even imagine how nightmarish things would have eventually gotten in Texas if there had actually been blackouts for months.

According to one expert, the state really was right on the verge of a “worst case scenario”

The worst case scenario: Demand for power outstrips the supply of power generation available on the grid, causing equipment to catch fire, substations to blow and power lines to go down.

If the grid had gone totally offline, the physical damage to power infrastructure from overwhelming the grid could have taken months to repair, said Bernadette Johnson, senior vice president of power and renewables at Enverus, an oil and gas software and information company headquartered in Austin.

For years, I have been telling my readers that they have got to have a back up plan for power, because during a major emergency the grid can fail.

And when it fails, it can literally cost some people their lives.  I was deeply saddened when I learned that one man in Texas actually froze to death sitting in his own recliner

 

As Texas suffered through days of power outages, a man reportedly froze to death in his recliner with his wife clinging to life beside him.

The man was found dead in his Abilene home on Wednesday after being without power for several days in the record cold.

Most Americans don’t realize that much of the rest of the world actually has much better power infrastructure than we do.  Just check out these numbers

In Japan, the average home sees only 4 minutes of power outages per year. In the American Midwest, the figure is 92 minutes per year. In the Northeast, it’s 214 minutes; all those figures cover only regular outages and not those caused by extreme weather or fires.

As our population has grown and our infrastructure has aged, performance has just gotten worse and worse.  In fact, things ran much more smoothly all the way back in the mid-1980s

According to an analysis by Climate Central, major outages (affecting more than 50,000 homes or businesses) grew ten times more common from the mid-1980s to 2012. From 2003 to 2012, weather-related outages doubled. In a 2017 report, the American Society of Civil Engineers reported that there were 3,571 total outages in 2015, lasting 49 minutes on average. The U.S. Energy Administration reports that in 2016, the average utility customer had 1.3 power interruptions, and their total blackout time averaged four hours.

America is literally crumbling all around us, and it getting worse with each passing year.

Our water systems are another example.

In Texas, the cold weather literally caused thousands of pipes to burst.  The damage caused by all of these ruined pipes is going to be in the billions of dollars.

 

Right now, we are being told that a total of 797 water systems in the state are currently reporting problems with “frozen or broken pipes”

Some 13.5 million people are facing water disruptions with 797 water systems throughout the state reporting issues such as frozen or broken pipes, according to Toby Baker, executive director for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. About 725 systems are under a boil water advisory, Baker said during a press conference Thursday.

Overall, approximately 7 million residents of the state live in areas that have been ordered to boil water, and it could take months for service to fully return to normal.

Without water, none of us can survive for long, and it is absolutely imperative that you have a back up plan in case your local system goes down.

In Houston, people that are without water in their homes have been forced to line up to fill buckets at a public spigot

Meanwhile, in scenes reminiscent of a third world country, Houston residents resorted to filling up buckets of water from a spigot in a local neighborhood.

One Houston resident, whose power has just gone back on Thursday after three days but still has no water, told DailyMail.com: ‘It is crazy that we just watched NASA land on Mars but here in Houston most of us still don’t have drinking water.’

You can watch video of this happening right here.  Of course if your local water system completely fails, there won’t even be a public spigot available for you to get water.

Shortages of food and other essential supplies are also being reported in Texas.

For Philip Shelley and his young wife, the situation became quite desperate fairly rapidly

 

Philip Shelley, a resident of Fort Worth, told CNN that he, his wife Amber and 11-month-old daughter, Ava, were struggling to stay warm and fed. Amber is pregnant and due April 4.

“(Ava) is down to half a can of formula,” Shelley said. “Stores are out if not extremely low on food. Most of our food in the refrigerator is spoiled. Freezer food is close to thawed but we have no way to heat it up.”

So what would they have done if the blackouts had lasted for months?

All over the state, extremely long lines have been forming at local supermarkets.  In some cases, people have started waiting way before the stores actually open

Joe Giovannoli, 29, arrived at a Central Market supermarket in Austin at 8:30 a.m. Thursday, an hour-and-a-half before it opened. Minutes later, more than 200 people had lined up behind him in the biting 26-degree weather.

Giovannoli’s wife is three months pregnant and the power in their one-bedroom Austin apartment blinked out Tuesday night. After a water pipe broke, firefighters also turned off the building’s water, he said. Giovannoli said he realized he still had it better than many others across Texas, but worried how long things will take to get back to normal.

This is happening in communities across Texas, and you can see video of one of these “bread lines” right here.

Of course those that had gotten prepared in advance did not have to wait in such long lines because they already had food.

Sadly, even though Joe Giovannoli had gotten to the supermarket so early, he later received really bad news

A few minutes before the store opened its doors, a manager stepped outside and warned those waiting in line that supplies inside were low: No produce, no baked goods, not much canned food.

“We haven’t had a delivery in four days,” he said.

Remember, this is just a temporary crisis in Texas that is only going to last for a few days.

So what would happen if a severe long-term national emergency disrupted food, water and power systems for months on end?

All it took to cause a short-term “collapse scenario” in the state of Texas was some cold weather.

Eventually, much worse things will happen to our nation, and it has become clear that we are not ready.

So get prepared while you still can, because time is running out.

Reprinted with permission from The Economic Collapse.

The Best of Michael Snyder

Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.

Copyright © The Economic Collapse

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2 hours ago, hamradio said:

Good thing Texas didn't secede from the Union, Biden wouldn't had been able to declared a state of emergency.

 

maxresdefault.jpg

Actually Texas did secede in 1860, but I assume you are talking about more recent threats to secede again?

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9 hours ago, JakeHolman said:

LewRockwell.com

anti-stateanti-warpro-market

 

The Temporary Collapse Of Texas Is Foreshadowing The Total Collapse Of The United States

By Michael Snyder

The Economic Collapse

February 20, 2021

We are getting a very short preview of what will eventually happen to the United States as a whole.  America’s infrastructure is aging and crumbling.  Our power grids were never intended to support so many people, our water systems are a complete joke, and it has become utterly apparent that we would be completely lost if a major long-term national emergency ever struck.  Texas has immense wealth and vast energy resources, but now it is being called a “failed state”.  If it can’t even handle a few days of cold weather, what is the rest of America going to look like when things really start to get chaotic in this country?

At this point, it has become clear that the power grid in Texas is in far worse shape than anyone ever imagined.  When extremely cold weather hit the state, demand for energy surged dramatically.  At the same time, about half of the wind turbines that Texas relies upon froze, and the rest of the system simply could not handle the massive increase in demand.

Millions of Texans were without power for days, and hundreds of thousands are still without power as I write this article.

And now we are learning that Texas was literally just moments away from “a catastrophic failure” that could have resulted in blackouts “for months”

 

Texas’ power grid was “seconds and minutes” away from a catastrophic failure that could have left Texans in the dark for months, officials with the entity that operates the grid said Thursday.

As millions of customers throughout the state begin to have power restored after days of massive blackouts, officials with the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, or ERCOT, which operates the power grid that covers most of the state, said Texas was dangerously close to a worst-case scenario: uncontrolled blackouts across the state.

I can’t even imagine how nightmarish things would have eventually gotten in Texas if there had actually been blackouts for months.

According to one expert, the state really was right on the verge of a “worst case scenario”

The worst case scenario: Demand for power outstrips the supply of power generation available on the grid, causing equipment to catch fire, substations to blow and power lines to go down.

If the grid had gone totally offline, the physical damage to power infrastructure from overwhelming the grid could have taken months to repair, said Bernadette Johnson, senior vice president of power and renewables at Enverus, an oil and gas software and information company headquartered in Austin.

For years, I have been telling my readers that they have got to have a back up plan for power, because during a major emergency the grid can fail.

And when it fails, it can literally cost some people their lives.  I was deeply saddened when I learned that one man in Texas actually froze to death sitting in his own recliner

 

As Texas suffered through days of power outages, a man reportedly froze to death in his recliner with his wife clinging to life beside him.

The man was found dead in his Abilene home on Wednesday after being without power for several days in the record cold.

Most Americans don’t realize that much of the rest of the world actually has much better power infrastructure than we do.  Just check out these numbers

In Japan, the average home sees only 4 minutes of power outages per year. In the American Midwest, the figure is 92 minutes per year. In the Northeast, it’s 214 minutes; all those figures cover only regular outages and not those caused by extreme weather or fires.

As our population has grown and our infrastructure has aged, performance has just gotten worse and worse.  In fact, things ran much more smoothly all the way back in the mid-1980s

According to an analysis by Climate Central, major outages (affecting more than 50,000 homes or businesses) grew ten times more common from the mid-1980s to 2012. From 2003 to 2012, weather-related outages doubled. In a 2017 report, the American Society of Civil Engineers reported that there were 3,571 total outages in 2015, lasting 49 minutes on average. The U.S. Energy Administration reports that in 2016, the average utility customer had 1.3 power interruptions, and their total blackout time averaged four hours.

America is literally crumbling all around us, and it getting worse with each passing year.

Our water systems are another example.

In Texas, the cold weather literally caused thousands of pipes to burst.  The damage caused by all of these ruined pipes is going to be in the billions of dollars.

 

Right now, we are being told that a total of 797 water systems in the state are currently reporting problems with “frozen or broken pipes”

Some 13.5 million people are facing water disruptions with 797 water systems throughout the state reporting issues such as frozen or broken pipes, according to Toby Baker, executive director for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. About 725 systems are under a boil water advisory, Baker said during a press conference Thursday.

Overall, approximately 7 million residents of the state live in areas that have been ordered to boil water, and it could take months for service to fully return to normal.

Without water, none of us can survive for long, and it is absolutely imperative that you have a back up plan in case your local system goes down.

In Houston, people that are without water in their homes have been forced to line up to fill buckets at a public spigot

Meanwhile, in scenes reminiscent of a third world country, Houston residents resorted to filling up buckets of water from a spigot in a local neighborhood.

One Houston resident, whose power has just gone back on Thursday after three days but still has no water, told DailyMail.com: ‘It is crazy that we just watched NASA land on Mars but here in Houston most of us still don’t have drinking water.’

You can watch video of this happening right here.  Of course if your local water system completely fails, there won’t even be a public spigot available for you to get water.

Shortages of food and other essential supplies are also being reported in Texas.

For Philip Shelley and his young wife, the situation became quite desperate fairly rapidly

 

Philip Shelley, a resident of Fort Worth, told CNN that he, his wife Amber and 11-month-old daughter, Ava, were struggling to stay warm and fed. Amber is pregnant and due April 4.

“(Ava) is down to half a can of formula,” Shelley said. “Stores are out if not extremely low on food. Most of our food in the refrigerator is spoiled. Freezer food is close to thawed but we have no way to heat it up.”

So what would they have done if the blackouts had lasted for months?

All over the state, extremely long lines have been forming at local supermarkets.  In some cases, people have started waiting way before the stores actually open

Joe Giovannoli, 29, arrived at a Central Market supermarket in Austin at 8:30 a.m. Thursday, an hour-and-a-half before it opened. Minutes later, more than 200 people had lined up behind him in the biting 26-degree weather.

Giovannoli’s wife is three months pregnant and the power in their one-bedroom Austin apartment blinked out Tuesday night. After a water pipe broke, firefighters also turned off the building’s water, he said. Giovannoli said he realized he still had it better than many others across Texas, but worried how long things will take to get back to normal.

This is happening in communities across Texas, and you can see video of one of these “bread lines” right here.

Of course those that had gotten prepared in advance did not have to wait in such long lines because they already had food.

Sadly, even though Joe Giovannoli had gotten to the supermarket so early, he later received really bad news

A few minutes before the store opened its doors, a manager stepped outside and warned those waiting in line that supplies inside were low: No produce, no baked goods, not much canned food.

“We haven’t had a delivery in four days,” he said.

Remember, this is just a temporary crisis in Texas that is only going to last for a few days.

So what would happen if a severe long-term national emergency disrupted food, water and power systems for months on end?

All it took to cause a short-term “collapse scenario” in the state of Texas was some cold weather.

Eventually, much worse things will happen to our nation, and it has become clear that we are not ready.

So get prepared while you still can, because time is running out.

Reprinted with permission from The Economic Collapse.

The Best of Michael Snyder

Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.

Copyright © The Economic Collapse

And most of the blame lies with Republicans, Republican controlled state and local governments and the corporations that support the Republicans.

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41 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Actually Texas did secede in 1860, but I assume you are talking about more recent threats to secede again?

Yes the idiotic idea of them wanting to do that,  wonder if they're having second thoughts.

Think that's one of the reason Texas chose not to import power outside avoiding regulations.

 Does have a valid argument regarding having the national grid interconnected fearing a cascade effect like what happened in the northeast.

1-s2.0-S1364032117308432-gr1.jpg

800px-Map_of_North_America,_blackout_200

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Good analogy, jumping through hoops to find life.  Why do scientist keep setting themselves up for a letdown?

At it's peak, Mars with the smaller magnetic field and atmospheric pressure to hold on to water still wouldn't make it anything close hospitable to life.  At most the pressure would be about 70,000 feet of Earth's - too thin to keep out cosmic / solar radiation and a magnetic field much weaker.  It boils down to Mars SIZE.

 

"Interstellar" (2014) is a film with finally some common sense.  Miller's planet about the size of Earth with a thick atmosphere, water galore and STERILE as an autoclave.  Water doesn't promise life. 

interstellar-bts-video-water-planet.jpg

 

Crew was so-o-o disappointed.

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The sky crane system is an accomplishment within itself, amazing this can be done at all. Glad he explained why you don't see any flames coming from the decent nozzles (hydrazine burns clear).  Hopefully that explanation prevents any conspiracy nutjob saying the landing was a fake. :wacko:

 

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13 hours ago, hamradio said:

The sky crane system is an accomplishment within itself, amazing this can be done at all. Glad he explained why you don't see any flames coming from the decent nozzles (hydrazine burns clear).  Hopefully that explanation prevents any conspiracy nutjob saying the landing was a fake. :wacko:

You can hope re: the conspiracy theorists, but it's pretty much a lost cause with them.  This morning I heard on the radio that there's a new one circulating:  that the snow that fell from the sky last week was "fake" and created by either Bill Gates or "the government" or China (I guess you can choose the most convenient villain to suit your world view).

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/texas-snow-conspiracy-theory-tiktok-b1805616.html

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9 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

You can hope re: the conspiracy theorists, but it's pretty much a lost cause with them.  This morning I heard on the radio that there's a new one circulating:  that the snow that fell from the sky last week was "fake" and created by either Bill Gates or "the government" or China (I guess you can choose the most convenient villain to suit your world view).

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/texas-snow-conspiracy-theory-tiktok-b1805616.html

Excerpt...The videos have invited plenty of ridicule, with one commentator mocking a girl for testing a snowball with a hairdryer by saying: “Holding a piece of ice over an electrical device may be just slightly dumber than voting for Ted Cruz.”

:lol:

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LewRockwell.com

anti-stateanti-warpro-market

 

Men Outnumber Women in The Sciences

Is it patriarchy at work, or is it for similar reasons as to why there are more men in jail?

By Walter E. Block

RT News

February 23, 2021

A new study that raises interesting questions about why gender disparities in different professions remain prevalent has provoked feminist ire. But academics shouldn’t be cancelled for addressing important issues like these.

Harvard President Larry Summers lost his job back in 2006 for merely speculating about why men are disproportionately overrepresented in physics, mathematics, chemistry, and other such STEM fields. Oh, yes, he mentioned the acceptable explanations: girls are taught that math is hard, little of this sort of thing is expected of them by our sexist society, they have very few role models, their entry to the laboratories is actively discriminated against, etc. So far, so good. No one gets cancelled for offering those bromides. But he also had the audacity to offer biological considerations as an additional account – and then, as they say, it hit the fan.

Now, along comes an article by Steve Stewart-Williams and Lewis G Halsey, published in the prestigious European Journal of Personality, entitled ‘Men, women and STEM: Why the differences and what should be done?’, which makes this very point. Feminists, both male and female, are of course outraged; they offer much heat, but no light, in their rejection of this thesis.

What is going on here?

 

STEM studies require a high level of intelligence – much more, way much more – than queer studies, or black studies, or feminist studies. But males and females, on average, equal each other in this dimension; their means are within a very few IQ points of each other. Why, then, the great disparity between men and women in these fields that require great intellect?

Averages cover up the real explanation. It lies, instead, in the statistical variance. Females are bunched toward the middle. Very few lie at a greater level than three, or especially four, standard deviations above the mean. The distaff side is God’s, or nature’s, insurance policy. Men, to the contrary, are all over the lot. They are God’s, or nature’s, crap shoot.

There are many, many more males at the right tail of the normal curve, and the same also applies to the left tail. It is for this reason that our nation’s jails, homeless shelters, and mental institutions are preponderantly filled with males; females are very rarely seen in these contexts. The former commit suicide to a far greater degree than the latter. But, similarly, at the other end of the normal distribution, chess grandmasters, math whizzes, and STEM scholars are all over-represented by men.

 

What is the argument that this phenomenon is biological? Assume the very opposite. Posit that a million years ago there was a race of people whose males were clustered around the mean, and whose females had great variance in ability. These people were otherwise equal to our grandparents in every way: the same overall average intelligence, strength, ability to cooperate; they even looked exactly like members of our species. Why would we beat them out in the struggle for world dominance? What advantage did our male-female differences convey to us?

First, consider their females. Many of them could get pregnant alright, but they would be too busy being in the prehistoric version of jails, mental institutions, homeless shelters, committing suicide, to be able to take care of their babies. Our great grandmothers, in sharp contrast, would have no difficulty with caring for the next generation.

Now consider their males. Very, very few of them are to be found three and four standard deviations above the mean. Biological lesson coming up. Males create far more **** than females generate eggs. If a woman gives birth to a baby every year from the time of puberty to menopause, she would be limited to something like 30 children. In actual practice, it is the very rare woman who has progeny in the double digits. Men are not limited in that way by biology. Very active males can reach three digits with ease, and even four digits if they are very energetic. Smarter men are able to have more children than stupid ones. Under our assumptions, very few cavemen of their species are at the outer reaches of intelligence. Not so for our great grandfathers.

Does biology play a strong role in STEM proportions? No such question can be settled in a short op-ed such as this. Is there plausibility in this hypothesis? Yes. Should people be canceled, such as Lawrence Summers from Harvard, for even contemplating such non-politically correct thoughts? Not if we value our civilization.

The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.

The Best of Walter E. Block

Dr. Block [send him mail] is a professor of economics at Loyola University New Orleans, and a senior fellow of the Ludwig von Mises Institute. He is the author of Defending the Undefendable, The Case for Discrimination, Labor Economics From A Free Market Perspective, Building Blocks for Liberty, Differing Worldviews in Higher Education, and The Privatization of Roads and Highways. His latest book is Yes to Ron Paul and Liberty.

Copyright © Autonomous Nonprofit Organization “TV-Novosti”

Previous article by Walter E. Block: A Flawed Impeachment for ‘Incitement’

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7 hours ago, JakeHolman said:

 

This isn’t rocket science.  Streaming sites such as Netflix have plenty of great stuff to watch, and at a fraction of what satélite or cable charge.

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Anybody ever thought since the amount of gravity is determined by mass, it's simply a residual effect of the strong nuclear force?  

EVERYTHING has gravity even if may be too small to measure at times.

This binary asteroid is one of the weakest gravitational forces which can be observed.

14883f7e-27c4-4d19-bfc8-042c3cc58856_192

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Remember or have one of these from the 1980's? Cosmos Kinetic Art.  Had mine in constant 24/7 hour motion since 1984. modified it to use a 5 volt regulator and external power adapter.

Finally had to replace it because friction during the past 37 years wore the cradle down.

Poor guy, can't get his to sync,  does take patience.

 

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