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What You Really Need to Be Afraid of When You Get in an Airplane

By Willie Shields
American Thinker

April 7, 2021

I have a friend who is fearful of commercial airlines.

At the gate, before boarding, he asks the agent the following question: “What is the captain’s name?”  If the answer indicates the pilot is female, he will not board that flight.  Any criticism of my friend’s lack of confidence in any qualified aviatrix is answered along these lines: “She can’t drive a stick shift. I should trust her with a Jumbo Jet?”

My friend is right to be cautious about flying, but for different reasons.  Like most air travelers, he doesn’t know what he doesn’t know.

After a career of being closely associated with the air traffic control system, I can confidently opine that female pilots should be near the bottom on anyone’s list of safety concerns.  Closer to the top of that list?  Affirmative action.

Affirmative action has eroded the efficacy of the air traffic control system to an alarming degree.  The air traffic controllers’ strike in the summer of 1981 was a crisis that the social engineers did not let go to waste.  They replaced the PATCO workforce with many of the liberal left’s favorites.  Let’s just say their favorites do not include straight, white, competent, experienced males.  However, some level of competence still must be added to the mix; the nature of air traffic control demands it.  When flying tubes of flesh and jet fuel are hurtling hither and yon at breakneck speeds, someone has to break the ties.  We can’t have controllers doing a “bang-up” job.

Affirmative action has eroded the efficacy of the air traffic control system to an alarming degree.  The air traffic controllers’ strike in the summer of 1981 was a crisis that the social engineers did not let go to waste.  They replaced the PATCO workforce with many of the liberal left’s favorites.  Let’s just say their favorites do not include straight, white, competent, experienced males.  However, some level of competence still must be added to the mix; the nature of air traffic control demands it.  When flying tubes of flesh and jet fuel are hurtling hither and yon at breakneck speeds, someone has to break the ties.  We can’t have controllers doing a “bang-up” job.

Now, you shouldn’t be blamed for thinking that incompetence would easily be outed and vanquished in an age of black boxes, videotapes, and other gotcha devices.  Unfortunately, the responsible are not always fingered, and mostly they are coddled and protected by the same bureaucrats who appointed them to the positions they can’t handle.  An illustration follows:

January 25, 1990.  Avianca 052, a Boeing 707 en route from Columbia to JFK Airport in Queens, N.Y.  After two missed approaches in bad weather, the pilot told the approach controller that he was “running out of fuel” and that he “needed priority.”  The flight received neither sympathy nor priority.  All four engines flamed out, and the 707 crash-landed in a wooded area of Long Island.  Seventy-five dead.  The FAA pointed to poor communication by the pilot and a language barrier.  At the time, when asked about this by a New York–area journalist, I informed the scribe that the ATC tapes were transcribed fully in English and that no foreign language was heard on the tapes.

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Future Nostalgia

Russ Smith

 

A look back at 1981’s Absence of Malice, when newspapers were humming. 

Several years ago, two movies about newspapers—the excellent Spotlight (2015) and awful The Post (2017), which featured Tom Hanks as a milquetoast Ben Bradlee, although it’s unlikely anyone could surpass Jason Robards’ portrayal of the my-****’s-bigger-than-yours Bradlee in All The President’s Men—made a lot of money at the box office. It struck me at the time that it was ripe for newspaper nostalgia, as the industry was/is in freefall. I suspect that once the pandemic recedes and Hollywood figures out that films aside from superhero franchise crowd-pleasers, like Star Wars XIV, can make money, more media/newspaper entries will appear, and some might be worthwhile, like Spotlight. I’d like to watch a film about the “woke revolution” at The New York Times, for example, or a biopic about Rupert Murdoch, who, while ostensibly still active at 90, doesn’t have time on his side.

My son Nicky and I have written previously for Splice Today about our family’s lockdown/quarantine movie schedule: for more than a year now, forced to abandon our weekend ritual of attending matinees, the four of us take turns choosing films, from John Ford classics to Paul Rudd slapstick sweet pickles, to watch on the flatscreen in the sunroom. Last Saturday I picked Sydney Pollack’s 1981 Absence of Malice, a yarn about a borderline shady businessman (Paul Newman) getting screwed by the local Miami daily, and in particular a self-righteous and arrogant reporter played by The Flying Nun Sally Field.

Although the industry was thrilled by double-digit profit margins at the time, which would only increase until the Internet purloined revenues, starting with classified ads and then everything else, including subscribers to print editions, viewed today Absence of Malice can also be seen as an artifact of a different American cultural era. (You can quibble that newspapers were “cultural,” but I won’t get bogged down in that argument, which in any case is now irrelevant.)

READ MORE >> https://www.splicetoday.com/moving-pictures/future-nostalgia?fbclid=IwAR2zi07ehGNAUojfCVYAcfHkBH3gxUzcmc6c-Si5n8Ju142SiHm2ns_1P-g

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On 4/17/2021 at 10:24 AM, JakeHolman said:

 

 

 

Wonder if this is a Black Project called the TR-3B?

Thinking back how the SR-71 Blackbird would had been  perceived by the public during the early 1960's if unveiled early imagine WHAT  the military  today have in operation.!  With fly by wire tech, just about any configuration can be made to fly. 

The craft in the FOX video seems to have anti collision lights.

1_us-spy-plane-SOCIAL.jpg

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11 hours ago, hamradio said:

 

Wonder if this is a Black Project called the TR-3B?

Thinking back how the SR-71 Blackbird would had been  perceived by the public during the early 1960's if unveiled early imagine WHAT  the military  today have in operation.!  With fly by wire tech, just about any configuration can be made to fly. 

The craft in the FOX video seems to have anti collision lights.

1_us-spy-plane-SOCIAL.jpg

The TR what??

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It's naive to think the military / CIA would retire the SR-71 without a replacement.

 

Aurora_x-plane_3.jpg

main-qimg-de175c92da66716fba5407b795e2c3

_91914972_alien.jpg

 

What advantages would a triangular shaped spy plane have over a an SR-71?

https://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/20869/what-advantages-would-a-triangular-shaped-spy-plane-have-over-a-an-sr-71

UFO-pic.jpg

 

Strange donuts on a string contrails spotted several times...a new propusion system

CRW_0005.jpg

 

During the late 1950's early 60's the CIA LOVED when people called the U2 flying out of Area 51 UFO's. Why not use the same psychology in keeping future aircraft secret.

First-U-2-On-Groom-Lake_0.jpg

 

 

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OK I get it now.  I was just skimming through a few things last night, and without watching any video.

Didn't recognize the model.  That and it sounded like a pretty specific model number for a a "UFO".  😁

Even following the official narrative (which I almost never do - I do my own research), the SR-71 was a high altitude reconnaissance plane which has been all but replaced by satellite imaging...

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17 minutes ago, MovieCollectorOH said:

OK I get it now.  I was just skimming through a few things last night, and without watching any video.

Didn't recognize the model.  That and it sounded like a pretty specific model number for a a "UFO".  😁

Even following the official narrative (which I almost never do - I do my own research), the SR-71 was a high altitude reconnaissance plane which has been all but replaced by satellite imaging...

Satellites have limitations where one can be at a moments notice (so much hydrozine) and can be knocked out.  At the speed a near low orbit any new reconnaissance plane can reach, no missile can  intercept.

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16 minutes ago, MovieCollectorOH said:

OK I get it now.  I was just skimming through a few things last night, and without watching any video.

Didn't recognize the model.  That and it sounded like a pretty specific model number for a a "UFO".  😁

Even following the official narrative (which I almost never do - I do my own research), the SR-71 was a high altitude reconnaissance plane which has been all but replaced by satellite imaging...

The SR-71 was limited as well.  It was designed without wideband communication links, so any recon had to be recorded on film, tape, or disks.  The older U-2 had been retrofitted to return data in real time.

Drones are used more often than anything else in aerial recon these days.  No human life is put at stake, and no hostages to take (as in the Powers incident) should it be shot down.

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