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SCIENCE, NATURE, HISTORY & CULTURE


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14 hours ago, hamradio said:

 

She hadn't a clue how far that tech would had gone.  Did just about  everything including a new addiction.

It was limited by what they could build as a working prototype at that time. I consider their getting as far as a flip-phone to be somewhat amazing.

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11 minutes ago, SansFin said:

It was limited by what they could build as a working prototype at that time. I consider their getting as far as a flip-phone to be somewhat amazing.

Think the first thing which emerge were the cordless telephones.  I remember having a 1st generation and it had a long antenna because it worked within the 1700 MHZ region just about the AM broadcast band.  

I kitchen loudspeaker phone? Heathkit had a couple  which could be used anywhere in the house circa mid 1970's

347634617.jpg

 

I have the GD-1112 version in the kitchen for hands free operation.

s-l1600.jpg

 

Amazing Heathkit had a WIRELESS intercom system in 1962!

Heathkit-intercom.png

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3 hours ago, hamradio said:

Think the first thing which emerge were the cordless telephones.  I remember having a 1st generation and it had a long antenna because it worked within the 1700 MHZ region just about the AM broadcast band.  

I kitchen loudspeaker phone? Heathkit had a couple  which could be used anywhere in the house circa mid 1970's

347634617.jpg

 

I have the GD-1112 version in the kitchen for hands free operation.

s-l1600.jpg

 

Amazing Heathkit had a WIRELESS intercom system in 1962!

Heathkit-intercom.png

This was at a time when TouchTone technology was just starting to be rolled out by AT&T, subscriber-dialed long distance was relatively new (instead of using a long distance operator) and not rolled out nationwide yet, many people still had party lines, even in large cities like NYC (remember Pillow Talk?), and many small towns were still using operator-run exchanges (no dial phones).   This had to have been seen as science fiction to most people back then - Dick Tracy stuff.

There were also car radio phones back in the 60s, so the concept of radio-telephony was not new.  It required the intervention of an operator to place a call to or from the car phone, and used a more primitive radio technology to connect to the phone than what is used today.   The cell phone concept dates to the late 1940s when AT&T petitioned the FCC for frequency space for research, but had to wait until transistor and integrated circuit technologies were developed, along with battery technology.  What we would call a cell or mobile phone today, using a primitive analog version of the technology employed today, came about in 1973 in prototype form, developed by Motorola, and it cost $4000 (in 1983 dollars).  Its battery lasted a whopping 30 minutes, and it took 10 hours to recharge under normal circumstances.  It wasn't commercially available until 1983, after receiving FCC approval to connect to the public telephone network.

Today's cell phones are just powerful computers with a phone function built in.

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

This was at a time when TouchTone technology was just starting to be rolled out by AT&T, subscriber-dialed long distance was relatively new (instead of using a long distance operator) and not rolled out nationwide yet, many people still had party lines, even in large cities like NYC (remember Pillow Talk?), and many small towns were still using operator-run exchanges (no dial phones).   This had to have been seen as science fiction to most people back then - Dick Tracy stuff.

There were also car radio phones back in the 60s, so the concept of radio-telephony was not new.  It required the intervention of an operator to place a call to or from the car phone, and used a more primitive radio technology to connect to the phone than what is used today.   The cell phone concept dates to the late 1940s when AT&T petitioned the FCC for frequency space for research, but had to wait until transistor and integrated circuit technologies were developed, along with battery technology.  What we would call a cell or mobile phone today, using a primitive analog version of the technology employed today, came about in 1973 in prototype form, developed by Motorola, and it cost $4000 (in 1983 dollars).  Its battery lasted a whopping 30 minutes, and it took 10 hours to recharge under normal circumstances.  It wasn't commercially available until 1983, after receiving FCC approval to connect to the public telephone network.

Today's cell phones are just powerful computers with a phone function built in.

 

The early car telephones took up a much of the trunk and used your spare tire for a shock absorber. 

ZeZZCMGuRktCDIhZVfGlhLzSzD8tpmDJ3ZeoTcYf

 

Hello, George Garage, I have a flat and my phone needs the spare. 

carphones-1.jpg

 

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On 7/25/2021 at 10:39 PM, txfilmfan said:

This was at a time when TouchTone technology was just starting to be rolled out by AT&T, subscriber-dialed long distance was relatively new (instead of using a long distance operator) and not rolled out nationwide yet, many people still had party lines, even in large cities like NYC (remember Pillow Talk?), and many small towns were still using operator-run exchanges (no dial phones).   This had to have been seen as science fiction to most people back then - Dick Tracy stuff.

There were also car radio phones back in the 60s, so the concept of radio-telephony was not new.  It required the intervention of an operator to place a call to or from the car phone, and used a more primitive radio technology to connect to the phone than what is used today.   The cell phone concept dates to the late 1940s when AT&T petitioned the FCC for frequency space for research, but had to wait until transistor and integrated circuit technologies were developed, along with battery technology.  What we would call a cell or mobile phone today, using a primitive analog version of the technology employed today, came about in 1973 in prototype form, developed by Motorola, and it cost $4000 (in 1983 dollars).  Its battery lasted a whopping 30 minutes, and it took 10 hours to recharge under normal circumstances.  It wasn't commercially available until 1983, after receiving FCC approval to connect to the public telephone network.

Today's cell phones are just powerful computers with a phone function built in.

The 1st and 2nd generation cellphones incorporated both digital and analog technology.  Digital for the linking and analog for voice.

It was easy to listen in on them using a down converter to scanner.  This is why it was advisable not to do personal business on them (well as cordless phones). You had no control of the signal once it left the antenna.  People don't realize the early tech was basically no different than a walkie talkie except it worked in duplex and higher frequencies.  Cordless phones used the low VHF police band like baby monitors.

If you ever owned a scanner during the 1990's early 2000's you will see gaps in the 800-900 MHZ region, this is because cellphones used the gaps  within the spectrum.

Modern smartphones since 3G are all digital and can't be intercepted except by special equipment  not available to the public. (yeah guess who CAN?)

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10 minutes ago, hamradio said:

The 1st and 2nd generation cellphones incorporated both digital and analog technology.  Digital for the linking and analog for voice.

It was easy to listen in on them using a down converter to scanner.  This is why it was advisable not to do personal business on them (well as cordless phones). You had no control of the signal once it left the antenna.  People don't realize the early tech was basically no different than a walkie talkie except it worked in duplex and higher frequencies.  Cordless phones used the low VHF police band like baby monitors.

If you ever owned a scanner during the 1990's early 2000's you will see gaps in the 800-900 MHZ region, this is because cellphones used the gaps  within the spectrum.

Modern smartphones since 3G are all digital and can't be intercepted except by special equipment  not available to the public. (yeah guess who CAN?)

No need for me to guess.  I worked in an industry where no wireless two-way devices were allowed in the area at all, ever.  No cell phones, no WiFi, no Bluetooth, etc..  Before I retired, it was becoming cumbersome, because so many off the shelf items (TVs, PCs, etc) have these things built in, and each one had to have their wireless tech guts physically removed before they could be brought inside.

When I was in college in the mid 80s, my roommate and I lived in a townhouse complex that was a mixture of college students and young families just starting out.  Our next door neighbors had a baby monitor and as my roommate was a radio enthusiast (eventually got his license after the Morse code req was dropped), he had a scanner.   We warned them that their "private" conversations weren't private at  all.

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- PaulCraigRoberts.org - https://www.paulcraigroberts.org -

The Facts about Slavery that Never Are Told In Black Studies and Critical Race Theory Courses

Posted By pcr3 On July 29, 2021 @ 7:14 pm In Guest Contributions | Comments Disabled

The Facts about Slavery that Never Are Told In Black Studies and Critical Race Theory Courses

https://www.unz.com/jtaylor/wait-slavery-is-our-original-sin/ [1] 

 
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On 8/6/2021 at 11:46 PM, JakeHolman said:

 

Not my cup of tea but sure do have high ratings.  Source wiki. (Odd title was confusing - a guide to?)

Review scores
Source Rating
All About Jazz 5/5 stars11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png[26]
AllMusic 5/5 stars11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png[27]
Classic Rock 9/10 stars7px-Star_full.svg.png7px-Star_full.svg.png7px-Star_full.svg.png7px-Star_full.svg.png7px-Star_full.svg.png7px-Star_full.svg.png7px-Star_full.svg.png7px-Star_full.svg.png7px-Star_empty.svg.png[28]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music 5/5 stars11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png[32]
The Great Rock Discography 9/10[33]
Mojo 5/5 stars11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png[29]
MusicHound 4/5 stars11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_empty.svg.png[34]
Pitchfork 10/10[30]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide 3.5/5 stars11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_full.svg.png11px-Star_half.svg.png11px-Star_empty.svg.png[35]
The Village Voice D+[31]
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