Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

TENDERLOIN (1928)


MissGulch
 Share

Recommended Posts

Thanks AnnieLaurie. I do know this film's existence is considered to be 'unknown' which I believe is different from 'lost' or maybe it's the same thing? Slang from the 20's and 30's is a like another language and there's a list of phrases and idioms somewhere- Taylorology perhaps, but tenderloin now refers to a high crime district in any city. Sounds very James Cagney.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Tenderloin" was a phrase used for a section of New York's Midtown Manhattan from around 1880 to just prior to 1920, thereabouts. As for the Movie, it was a Warner Bros. picture featuring Conrad Nagel. It is concidered LOST. A small chance could exist that it may turn up in Europe, as it was released in Scandanavia in 1930....You never know?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe the "Tenderloin District" as it was known, was called that because it's shape on a map was reminicent of that particular cut of meat.

TENDERLOIN was more significant for it's hybrid status; it has a part-talkie Vitaphone score, then famous for showing Delores Costello's lisp, and overly melodramatic dialogue. TIME magazine quoted her during a scene where she's being attacked:"Have you no thithter?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gosh, that's funny and audiences probably roared with laughter- poor Delores (Jobyna Ralston and Marion Davies had speech problems also -stuttering, I think) It would be interesting to see more of these movies that show another dimension to the types of films of the day- people would be surprised to see silent films addressing social issues. Alas poor Brown Eyes, we knew you well...

 

beefcuts.gif

 

 

Maybe tofu tonight...LOL

 

Message was edited by: MissGulch

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, they did laugh at many of the star's voices when they heard them for the first time, and many stories,(mostly un true) rose from that experience.

One of the most famous was that John Gilbert's voice was high and squeeky or sounded effeminate. This legend even gave rise to a hilarious Sid Caeser skit, but it's not based in fact.

Gilbert was laughed off the screen for his appearance in "HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT", but not because his voice was ridiculous, it was the lines he was saying; all archly fake and flowery. Legend has it L.B.Mayer wanted to sabotage him and ordered the technicians to screw up the recording somehow. But that's not true either. Obviously the film must have been some kind of money maker in the end, as they made two alternate language versions of it ("OLYMPIA" French, and "OLIMPIA" Spanish )

Gilbert had a nasal, yet trained voice, sort of like Ronald Colman with a head cold. About the worst voices, few were so bad they stopped being in film. Many were inhanced by their voices, like W.C.Fields, William Powell, Gary Cooper, and the aforementioned Mr.Coleman.

 

At least they stopped with "Tenderloin District". Who would want to live in some place called the "Butt Steak" district?

 

Message was edited by: Factotum

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So true. Wonder what European translations of the title would be...

 

But I do believe the conspiracy theory that L.B. Mayer sabotaged John Gilbert's attempt to start production of a screenplay that was later called *DAWN PATROL (1930)* with Howard Hawks - a great film that would have changed the course of history for Gilbert.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But was Dawn Patrol ever in the hands of MGM? First National was still finding plum stories for Richard Barthelmess, who did the leading role in that film.

In 1930, Gilbert was doing "REDEMPTION", a classic Tolstoy epic of misery and degradation, sure to please Russians. I found this cheerless relic on the long and talky side, but I got the impression Gilbert was really throwing his heart into it, and why not? The ham in him rose to the occassion- He was showing what an artist he was. I have a still showing him in the dying sequence where he's made up to be old and unkempt, but he looks like the Wolfman. They reshot it with less hair and dirt, leaving him at least recognisable.

His other 1930 release was "WAY FOR A SAILOR", a rough and tumble, hard drinking,fighting and womanising masculine adventure in the style of Hawks or Ford, sometimes even vulgar. Shipmate Wallace Beery is named "Tripod". Guess Why!

These distincly different roles were typical of Gilbert who wanted to be known for more than just playing Garbo's Toyboy. Sadly, I think that is pretty much his legacy.

 

Incidentally, though I've watched and ernestly collected film for forty years, I've never seen HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT broadcast. Do you think TCM will get to it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Howard Hawks brought the story of the yet to be named *DAWN PATROL* to John Gilbert who wanted to avoid a romantic role for his first sound picture, while he was still under contract at MGM, according to Gilbert's daughter's biography _DARK STAR_. Mayer, of course refused in his usual abusive way, humiliating Gilbert and the rest is 'history.' Hawks produced the movie at First National two years later.

 

As for *HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT,* anything's possible around here, who knows, as nosound said...let's put in a request for John Gilbert day.

 

I wouldn't mind seeing that still of Wolfman Jack, if you've got the time, Factotum, and a seven year old around to show you how to scan and post it...just kidding- Forty years, eh? Or maybe not, if it's a rare photo, you may want to protect its' value.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Scottman,

 

Huh, I am all confused by Factotum's post? I thought REDEMPTION was actually filmed first in '29, and not HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT, and was going to be Gilbert's first talkie, but hating the picture, He begged MGM not to release it? Later in 1930, they did anyway? Isn't this correct???

 

Incidentally, apparently THE BIG PARADE is now tied up in some sort of Rights issues as well, since it has not aired on TCM in any form since 2004? Do you know anything about this matter? Or is it just because the latest version was supposed to be ready to go a long time ago, and it still isn't available for broadcast? I know David Shepard said the score had yet to be recorded a few months ago, but is that the only hold up???

Link to comment
Share on other sites

*HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT* was released September 28, 1929 and *REDEMPTION,* although made first, was released April 5, 1930. Eleanor Boardman recalled that John Gilbert tried to buy *REDEMPTION* so he could "dump the prints and negatives somewhere off Catalina Island." But that may be another Hollywood myth. The studio refused to sell it, so it was shelved.

 

~found this in _DARK STAR_ -a book with a great index and detailed filmography!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kate,

 

I thought so? I have been having E-mail trouble for the past few hours here, so if people can't reach me I apologize?

 

Another vote for a John Gilbert Birthday festival here! Tell you what I would love to see TCM run REDEMPTION. My copy is from years, and years ago, recorded off TNT with commercials, not TCM! Plus it's got both Eleanor Boardman and Renee Adoree in it, so put in a request!

 

Additionally, will we ever see King Vidor's HIS HOUR (1924) on TCM? This is the film that made Gilbert a Mega-Star! Course I would settle for debut's of either MAN, WOMAN, and SIN (1927), or THE COSSACKS (1928).

 

Also I want know if THE DARK ANGEL (U. A. 1925) with Ronald Coleman, and Vilma Banky is in the Warner's vault? Silent Era. Com says that "a print may exist in the MGM/United Artist's Archives", but they can't confirm if it actually does or not? Why are the Status of films like this one, and FORBIDDEN HOURS (1928) so frustratingly sketchy?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But if it's HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT that gave him all the trouble, why would REDEMPTION be the one he wanted to squelch?

 

The only times I have seen clips of HGN were in a long ago series (circa 1963) called HOLLYWOOD AND THE STARS and in the 1979 HOLLYWOOD episode on Gilbert. Both were used to illustrate the dire dialogue they put him through. Oddly, even though it didn't sound like it, the earlier series went along with the myth of his "squeaky" voice anyway.

 

Obviously a case of "Are you going to believe me, or your lying ears?"

 

In the latter, we go on to explain that it was embarrassing for the feminine fans to hear the same flowery and unrealistic sweet talk that a silent phantasy can sustain, but sound only destroys. An article from a fan magazine (SCREENLAND, April 1930) was shown, which discusses this as a current experience.

 

REDEMPTION was as I said, a bit dull, but then again, let's face it, 1930 MGM pacing is always slow. At least nobody was laughing at it.

 

I'd quite enjoy showing the still of the "Too much make-up" version of death scene, but I have no idea where it is now, and I haven't access to a scanner anyway. Sorry!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...