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NickAndNora34

NickAndNora34's Disney Movie Journey

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On 5/11/2018 at 6:25 AM, TikiSoo said:

speedracer said: "Unless the cheapest one has someone else's personal handwriting all over the cover (for some reason, people feel inclined to write their name on the front of the movie case in Sharpie)

A quick wipe of nail polish remover (weak toluene solution) will remove Sharpie without harming the surface.

You don't know how much I appreciate this information, Tiki Soo! I didn't think anything would remove Sharpie writing. Can't wait to try it and thanks.

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#12: FUN AND FANCY FREE (1947) 

This one also deals with the musical stylings of Dinah Shore (like its predecessor, Make Mine Music), although the film starts with Jiminy Cricket singing about how he doesn't like to let things bother him, and he enjoys ignoring his problems. He stumbles upon a room in which a pair of glum children's toys (a doll & a stuffed bear) reside. To cheer them up, he plays a record entitled, "Bongo," which the audience learns is a "musical story sung by Dinah Shore." 

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Bongo is a little circus bear who longs for the appreciation he thinks he deserves. He ultimately escapes his train car and rides his unicycle through the forest. He quickly learns that the wild is exponentially different from his expectations. He ends up getting harassed by a much bigger and stronger bear who wants Bongo's new girlfriend, Lulabelle, for himself. Just as I started thinking that this segment was dragging on way too long, it did not end, surprisingly. This portion ended at the 37 minute, 15 second mark. 

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The second and only other animated portion of this film was the "Jack and the Beanstalk" story starring Mickey, Donald, and Goofy. Disney favorite, Luana Patten, introduced this one (she is adorable, but her acting is atrocious).

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Instead of having Luana read a storybook and make little comments to the audience every so often, she is alone in a 35 year old man's house with his 2 puppets (not including his female hand puppet). I'm just saying this is a strange way of telling a story. Also, this man is not talented in the ventriloquism department; I could very clearly see his mouth move the entire time. Basically, this man uses his puppets to assist in recounting the tale of "Mickey, Donald, & Goofy and the Beanstalk."

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This entire segment was a bit boring, save for the part where Donald literally has murder in his eyes and grabs the axe to kill the cow so he can have a decent meal for once.

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Fairly straight-forward interpretation of the original tale. Nothing too impressive. 

*Score: 6/10*

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7 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

#11: FUN AND FANCY FREE (1947) 

Instead of having Luana read a storybook and make little comments to the audience every so often, she is alone in a 35 year old man's house with his 2 puppets (not including his female hand puppet). I'm just saying this is a strange way of telling a story. Also, this man is not talented in the ventriloquism department; I could very clearly see his mouth move the entire time. Basically, this man uses his puppets to assist in recounting the tale of "Mickey, Donald, & Goofy and the Beanstalk."

I assume you're being ironic, and have heard Edgar Bergen on radio?  (Where he was better suited than in movies.) ;)

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#13: MELODY TIME (1948) 

How many of these musical revue things am I going to have to watch (it's funny how I say "have to" as if someone's forcing me to do this challenge)? This one was, surprisingly, not featuring Dinah Shore. There were 7 animated segments in this one, which differs significantly from its predecessor, "Fun and Fancy Free" (which only had 2). 

The first piece was "Once Upon a Wintertime," about a young couple who go on a sleigh ride and then go ice skating. The birds and bunnies sit around and observe the couple for some reason. It was a cute piece of animation, but definitely not something to write home about. 

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2: A modern take on the classical musical piece, "Flight of the Bumblebee." This one was quite short, which I wish I could say was true about the next one. 

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3: The legend of Johnny Appleseed, apparently. This one was fairly lengthy. I admit I didn't pay super close attention to it. I recognized this one, though, from seeing it somewhere in my childhood maybe? 

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4: The Andrews Sisters accompanied this one about a tugboat, entitled "Little Toot." I guess this was a sort of cautionary tale for children to behave? That's what I was getting from this, at least. 

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5: Fred Waring and his Pennsylvanians present their arrangement of "Trees," a poem by Joyce Kilmer. Trees? Really, Walt? I can't wait to get back into the more traditional animated features. Some of these segments are really killing my resolve. 

6: "Blame it on the Samba" (with Ethel Smith on the piano and the Dinning Sisters on the vocals). Donald, Panchito, and Jose made an appearance in this. Wonderful. As if I didn't already get enough of them in "Saludos Amigos" and "The Three Caballeros." 

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7: Roy Rogers and the Sons of the Pioneers present "Pecos Bill." Perhaps this was the inspiration behind the quick-service restaurant located in Magic Kingdom in Walt Disney World in FL (Adventureland, to be exact). Bobby Driscoll & Luana Patten were featured in this, as well as Roy Rogers and his trusty steed, Trigger. 

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Overall, this movie was essentially along the same lines as "Make Mine Music" and "Fun and Fancy Free." Like I said, I can't wait to enter the classic animated period (to me, starts in 1950 with Cinderella). 

*Score: 4.5/10*

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5 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

#12: MELODY TIME (1948) 

How many of these musical revue things am I going to have to watch (it's funny how I say "have to" as if someone's forcing me to do this challenge)?

Just one more, and it's not a musical--

There were seven "Package" films, as Disney had to assemble shorts to get the studio back on its feet during and after wartime:  Reluctant Dragon, Saludos Amigos, Three Caballeros, Fun & Fancy Free, Make Mine Music, Melody Time, and...that leaves only Adventures of Ichabod & Mr. Toad.

Then we're back in the fairytale comfort-zone, unless you're going into the live-actions too.

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*SONG OF THE SOUTH (1948)* 

Skipped at the moment  due to not being able to find it anywhere. 

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1 hour ago, NickAndNora34 said:

*SONG OF THE SOUTH (1948)* 

Skipped at the moment  due to not being able to find it anywhere. 

Wasn't that already posted back at the beginning of the thread?
 

Y'know, I never even would have HEARD of Archive.org, if one of the posters didn't keep finding all his YouTubes and rentals there:

https://archive.org/details/SongOfTheSouth_Disney

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4 hours ago, EricJ said:

Wasn't that already posted back at the beginning of the thread?
 

Thanks for the link, Eric :)

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#11: SONG OF THE SOUTH (1946) (going backwards number-wise due to being able to actually watch this one after all). 

Starring: Ruth Warrick, Bobby Driscoll, Luana Patten, Lucile Watson.

A young couple and their young son travel to the wife's mother's plantation. The father leaves his wife and son at the plantation because he has "a job to do." I don't exactly know what this "job" is as there doesn't seem to be any context clues.

Johnny (the little boy played by Bobby Driscoll) meets one of his grandmother's servants, Uncle Remus, and quickly strikes up a friendship with him. Remus helps Johnny pass his lonely days by telling him fanciful stories about Brer Fox, Rabbit, and Bear. Most notably, the song "Zip a Dee Doo Dah" (that is featured on the Splash Mountain ride at both Disneyland and Walt Disney World) originated from this film. 

Eventually, Johnny becomes friends with a little girl who lives down the road named Ginny (Luana Patten). Ginny gives Johnny one of her dog's puppies, which ultimately creates a rift between Johnny and his mother. Unfortunately, an accident occurs towards the end of the movie, but on the bright side, it brings Johnny's father home where he belongs.

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I was most definitely not a fan of this one. The story and characters are weak, and it wasn't all that entertaining. Also, Lucile Watson was completely wasted in this film. I enjoy her in other things I've seen her in, and wish they would have given her more to do. 

*Score: 3/10*

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NickandNora, I saw “Song of the South” a few years ago and came away feeling pretty much the same as you did—it was dull. I’m not even a fan of its ride at Disneyland. Although I’m not a fan of rides where you can get soaked, so that probably also has something to do with it. Splash Mountain is at the bottom of my list when it comes to Disneyland. 

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On 7/5/2018 at 10:35 PM, speedracer5 said:

NickandNora, I saw “Song of the South” a few years ago and came away feeling pretty much the same as you did—it was dull. I’m not even a fan of its ride at Disneyland. Although I’m not a fan of rides where you can get soaked, so that probably also has something to do with it. Splash Mountain is at the bottom of my list when it comes to Disneyland. 

Lately, Splash Mountain has been breaking down whenever I've visited the park. I don't like to go on it at night, since it gets too cool out. It would be nice today, as the thermometers are registering at 95 degrees...

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#14: SO DEAR TO MY HEART (1948) 

Bobby Driscoll stars in this as a young orphaned boy named Jeremiah who lives with his grandmother (played by Beulah Bondi) on her farm. He dreams about owning and training his own champion race-horse, but those dreams are quickly put on the back burner when his grandmother's sheep give birth to a few lambs. One of the lambs is black, and the mother neglected him at birth. Jeremiah ends up keeping the lamb as a pet despite his grandmother's qualms, and, as you can easily imagine it, the lamb's main goal in life is to wreak havoc around the farm and the neighborhood.

Luana Patten (another of Walt's favorites) is in this as Bobby's best friend (again). I didn't mind her in "Song of the South" but she tested every single one of my nerves in this. Her voice is so high-pitched, it's a wonder my neighbor's dogs didn't show up at my front door. Her acting is terrible, but she's adorable so I guess that's what kept getting her these roles.

One standout in this is Burl Ives as Jeremiah's Uncle Hiram. He sings the song "Lavender Blue (Dilly Dilly)" in one scene, which, coincidentally, is the lullaby Cinderella's mother sings her in the 2015 live action remake. I thought that was an interesting bit of trivia.

Also, during the animation segments involving the owl, the songs sounded suspiciously like the themes to "Gone with the Wind" (1939). All in all, this movie didn't really stand out to me. 

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*Score: 4/10*

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#15: THE ADVENTURES OF ICHABOD AND MR. TOAD (1949)

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This film is based on the "The Wind in the Willows" novel (by Kenneth Grahame). Basil Rathbone narrates this and also voices the policeman. It deals with a badger, rat, and mole whose main purpose in life is to keep their eyes on their wild and frantic friend, Toad. Toad keeps undergoing all these manias where he becomes obsessed with the next big thing in terms of transportation. Rat and some of the other town citizens think Toad is a menace to society and deserves to be locked up after being accused of stealing a motorcar.

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It is discovered that Toad may actually be innocent for once, and his friends come to his rescue and attempt to prove his innocence. I, personally, am not a fan of Toad as a character. I am also not a fan of Cyril, his equine servant/friend who speaks with a severely grating Cockney accent. Toad is a completely immature and obnoxious character who, despite going to jail, doesn't even change for the better at the end.

The next tale deals with Ichabod Crane (Legend of Sleepy Hollow) and is narrated by Mr. Bing Crosby himself. One issue with this story that I noticed right off, was that the character Brom (1790 version of a jock) feeds the stray dogs and his horse a barrel of beer. I'm fairly certain that counts as animal abuse. I mean, I'm not an expert or anything, but I'm pretty sure.

Ichabod is the new schoolteacher in this quaint little village. He is an interesting individual, to say the least. For starters, he refuses to discipline the students whose mothers are good cooks. He wants to stay on their good sides so he'll get invited over for meals and won't have to spend money on buying his own groceries or something.  As a result, his school is a literal madhouse. It only descends further into madness and chaos once Ichabod discovers the lovely Katrina. He falls head over heels for her, which I guess causes him to not bother wearing any shoes in the classroom while he's teaching?

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He finds himself in the woods, and is frightened almost to death by the Headless Horseman. And that's about all she wrote, folks. 

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*Score: 4/10*

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#16: CINDERELLA (1950)

I remember first watching this one when I was very young. It was one of my favorites then, and is one of my favorites now. The choral opening is quite lovely, and I am enamored of this tradition in some of the older animated classics (i.e. Lady and the Tramp & Sleeping Beauty). There is also a storybook opening, which is the same for "Snow White" and "Sleeping Beauty." 

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The first song the audience is introduced to is "A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes." Cinderella sings this after being awakened by her mouse and bird friends. Cinderella is interrupted by her stepsisters and stepmother ringing the bells and shouting. It's really too bad that once Cinderella's father died, she became an indentured servant whose only friends are rats and vermin. Quick question: Was Cinderella actually able to speak to and understand these animals, or was she so starved for normal human interaction that she imagined they were really talking to her?

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You also know the Tremaines are evil, because they named their cat "Lucifer." Lucifer is also downright mean, but to be fair, he is constantly harassed by the excessive amount of rodents that have practically taken over the home. 

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Another thing I find interesting is that the King doesn't actually seem to care which woman his son marries so long as he gets a few grandkids out of it. Despite my somewhat pessimistic words, I do very much enjoy the story, songs, and characters. Some of my favorite animation pieces from this, are the parts where Cinderella's shredded pink gown gets transformed into her iconic white ballgown, and where the fat mouse, Gus Gus (which is somehow short for Octavius), tries to carry more corn than is physically possible for a mouse to carry (regardless of stomach size). Another that comes to mind is the "Oh Sing Sweet Nightingale" scene in which Cinderella is washing the floor, and her image appears in all the bubbles. 

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*Score: 8/10*

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On 4/26/2018 at 6:23 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

I have decided to go back and watch/re-watch all of Disney's animated and live action movies in order by release year (except for Disney Channel Original Movies & straight-to-video sequels), so I thought I would go ahead and start a thread in case anyone is interested and wants to see my reviews and trivia as I progress. If anyone wants to contribute to this, feel free. I'm mainly just doing this, because I think it could be interesting to maybe 1 or 2 people on this site lol. 

Can't wait to read your reviews. Sounds like a fab idea and to do it in chronological order is brilliant!

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1 hour ago, NickAndNora34 said:

#15: THE ADVENTURES OF ICHABOD AND MR. TOAD (1949)

Score: 2/5 

t is discovered that Toad may actually be innocent for once, and his friends come to his rescue and attempt to prove his innocence. I, personally, am not a fan of Toad as a character. I am also not a fan of Cyril, his equine servant/friend who speaks with a severely grating Cockney accent. Toad is a completely immature and obnoxious character who, despite going to jail, doesn't even change for the better at the end.

Unlike the invented horse and bartender, Toad's character is from the book, but Eric Blore as a cheery Toad wasn't as lovably flawed as David Jason's manic upper-class-twit from the Disney Channel 80's British stop-motion series:

 

1 hour ago, NickAndNora34 said:

It's really too bad that once Cinderella's father died, she became an indentured servant whose only friends are rats and vermin. Quick question: Was Cinderella actually able to speak to and understand these animals, or was she so starved for normal human interaction that she imagined they were really talking to her?

Disney's Cinderella takes so much cultural-baggage guff from target-shooting feminists who haven't seen the movie, it overlooks the fact that Disney's version captures the message of the story--Cindy is helped because she's good to others.

She's not, as cynical female self-loathers like to portray her, a "doormat", or "psychotically happy" as she scrubs floors, and the story's not about "How to Marry a Millionaire":  She knows how bad things are for her, and even says so, to the dog ("You'd like to chase that cat, wouldn't you?...But we shouldn't!") but even stepsisters are family, and she believes in the power of returning good for bad.  That moral optimism is literally torn up in her face when the Steps savagely rip her mouse-present dress to shreds, and she's just about to permanently crisis on her one belief when, as in every fairy tale, Karma Happens.

be9575f5d82d38d5d5ce55b2b06e207b--cinder

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7 hours ago, EricJ said:

Disney's Cinderella takes so much cultural-baggage guff from target-shooting feminists who haven't seen the movie, it overlooks the fact that Disney's version captures the message of the story--Cindy is helped because she's good to others.

She's not, as cynical female self-loathers like to portray her, a "doormat", or "psychotically happy" as she scrubs floors, and the story's not about "How to Marry a Millionaire":  She knows how bad things are for her, and even says so, to the dog ("You'd like to chase that cat, wouldn't you?...But we shouldn't!") but even stepsisters are family, and she believes in the power of returning good for bad.  That moral optimism is literally torn up in her face when the Steps savagely rip her mouse-present dress to shreds, and she's just about to permanently crisis on her one belief when, as in every fairy tale, Karma Happens.

So true.  When I re-watched Cinderella a couple of years ago, I was really struck by how modern she seemed as a character, complete with her own streak of sarcasm.  I love the relationship she has with the rodents, as they are not just companions, but in a way confidants with whom she can share her frustrations.  There's a fun little moment, during the aforementioned "Sing Sweet Nightingale" in which she tells her friends she'll have to interrupt the "music," saying it with a clearly mocking tone.  While she's not a mean or vengeful person, she's also not going out of her way to love or get along with her step family.  She just does what she has to do to survive.

It's also interesting that so many accuse the Disney princesses of lying around waiting to be rescued by a prince, when in fact Cinderella doesn't do that at all (neither does Aurora, but I'll let NickAndNora34 get to that one first).  In fact, the prince couldn't seem to care less about her.  It's the king who pursues the owner of the glass slipper rather than the prince (a change from older versions of the tale) because his biological grandfather clock is ticking, and the only reason she is able to try the thing on is because her animal friends help her.  As EricJ says, it's a case of being kind to others and others being kind in return.  Not a bad lesson for children.  The prince is basically her reward in the end, a nice piece of man candy for all she's been through!

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1 hour ago, Feego said:

It's also interesting that so many accuse the Disney princesses of lying around waiting to be rescued by a prince, when in fact Cinderella doesn't do that at all (neither does Aurora, but I'll let NickAndNora34 get to that one first).  In fact, the prince couldn't seem to care less about her.  It's the king who pursues the owner of the glass slipper rather than the prince (a change from older versions of the tale) because his biological grandfather clock is ticking, and the only reason she is able to try the thing on is because her animal friends help her.  As EricJ says, it's a case of being kind to others and others being kind in return.  Not a bad lesson for children.  The prince is basically her reward in the end, a nice piece of man candy for all she's been through!

And while we're on Disney-princess inaccuracies, since it wasn't covered the last time the film came around:  The other princess that gets all the clueless-misinformation loaded-issue guff (it's still annoying even in the current Wreck-It Ralph 2 trailer) is Snow White--Who, as any crusading feminist will tell you, is cruelly damaging our empowered daughters because she A) loves cleaning house, and sings happily as she works, and B ) sings about waiting for a prince to come out of nowhere and sweep her away to domestic bliss, rather than determine her own life.

Both of which are bzzt-thanks-for-playing wrong:  In A)'s case, Snow at first doesn't know anyone lives in the empty cottage, but sees the small chairs and unwashed mess and thinks "It must be orphan children, with no one to take care of them!"...And the only reason she cleans is to hope to "pay" for shelter for the night.  In B's case, she already has a prince--They met in the first scene, remember?  She can't be sure if he knows where she is by now, since she could use a little protection while in hiding and on the run from a jealous psychotic, but it would be nice if he did.

(It's sort of embarrassing that it's always guys who clean up the Disney-princess arguments, because our brains aren't wired to think "symbolically" and don't take every movie  character personally...)

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

And while we're on Disney-princess inaccuracies, since it wasn't covered the last time the film came around:  The other princess that gets all the clueless-misinformation loaded-issue guff (it's still annoying even in the current Wreck-It Ralph 2 trailer) is Snow White--Who, as any crusading feminist will tell you, is cruelly damaging our empowered daughters because she A) loves cleaning house, and sings happily as she works, and B ) sings about waiting for a prince to come out of nowhere and sweep her away to domestic bliss, rather than determine her own life.

Both of which are bzzt-thanks-for-playing wrong:  In A)'s case, Snow at first doesn't know anyone lives in the empty cottage, but sees the small chairs and unwashed mess and thinks "It must be orphan children, with no one to take care of them!"...And the only reason she cleans is to hope to "pay" for shelter for the night.  In B's case, she already has a prince--They met in the first scene, remember?  She can't be sure if he knows where she is by now, since she could use a little protection while in hiding and on the run from a jealous psychotic, but it would be nice if he did.

(It's sort of embarrassing that it's always guys who clean up the Disney-princess arguments, because our brains aren't wired to think "symbolically" and don't take every movie  character personally...)

I agree with you here to an extent. I wouldn't phrase it quite so acerbically, but I think you make some good points. I don't think these princess movies are bad examples for young girls. I get where you're coming from, especially with "Snow White." She really didn't sit around waiting for a man to rescue her; it just kinda happened that way. She needed someplace to stay while she was in hiding from the Evil Queen. I personally don't know anyone who thinks this way about these princesses, thank God. My life would be full of arguments. 

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That first screen capture you have of Cinderella she looks like a cartoon of Jane Powell....LOOKALIKES thread!

When I was a kid I hated Burl Ives. His voice was kind of gargley. Now that I'm an adult & have seen him in so many movies, I really really appreciate his talent. He was in a fair number of movies too.

One issue with this story that I noticed right off, was that the character Brom (1790 version of a jock) feeds the stray dogs and his horse a barrel of beer. I'm fairly certain that counts as animal abuse. I mean, I'm not an expert or anything, but I'm pretty sure.

Not really. It's an old tradition to give dogs & horses beer. Horses like the grainy taste and there's supposed to be something in beer that kills intestinal worms for animals. I certainly don't trust it to do the job these days, but before modern pharmaceuticals, this was a common practice.

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#18: ALICE IN WONDERLAND (1951)  

The movie begins with one of those choral opening songs. I've mentioned this before, but I love these. 

Alice's sister is reading to her from a history book, and Alice can't pay attention because there are so many wonderful things outside to explore. To be fair, they are having a history lesson outside and it's sunny and nature is blossoming and blooming. Alice starts to sing about "A World of My Own" in which everything is nonsense and is, therefore, more entertaining and creative. 

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At the conclusion of the song, the White Rabbit shows up and starts to dash off, since he's "late for a very important date." He runs into a rabbit hole...

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...and Alice decides to squeeze inside and ends up falling very far.She is not in the least perturbed about this, and I do have to give her credit. She is quite brave (at least in this scene). 

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The rabbit goes through a door (with a talking doorknob) that is entirely too small for Alice to fit into, so she drinks a potion that makes her very small, but the door is locked, and the key is on the table, which is way too high up for her to reach. She is then provided with a cookie that makes her grow very large. She becomes very upset, and her tears start to flood the entire room.

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She then drinks more of the potion and shrinks and slides right through the lock of the door. 

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There is a dodo bird sailing on top of a blackbird and a smaller teal bird is pushing him from behind. Alice keeps asking for help from all these watery passers by, but everyone ignores her until she crash lands onto a small piece of rocky land. Coincidentally, the white rabbit washes by on an umbrella and dashes off once Alice starts calling his name. Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum show up at this point. 

They tell her the tale of the Walrus and the Oyster. I zoned out, to be perfectly honest. Once the story is over, Alice tries to tell the brothers she needs to leave, but they keep blathering on, so she sneaks away. Just a reminder: her sole purpose for following the white rabbit is to crash the party she thinks he's late for. He orders her to find his gloves since he apparently can't. Alice eats another cookie that makes her grow and she breaks through the rabbit's house. 

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She eats a carrot and shrinks. So I guess it doesn't really matter which type of food she eats. It'll all shrink her if she wishes it to. She stumbles upon a fantastical garden. The flowers are all alive, and the insects are all shaped to be the literal versions of their names (rocking horse flies & bread and butterflies). The flowers sing "All in the Golden Afternoon" to impress Alice with their vocal talents. Once they realize that she isn't a flower after all, they give her the cold shoulder and kick her out. She meets, and quickly becomes frustrated with, the Caterpillar. It's clear all he's interested in is blowing smoke rings and asking the same questions over and over. 

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Alice meets the Mad Hatter and the March Hare and has an insane tea party (Why is a raven like a writing desk?)

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The white rabbit shows up again, and Alice follows him into Tulgey Wood. There are musical frogs and birds and other mystical creatures. She sings a song about how she gives herself advice all the time, but seldom follows it. She finds her way to the Queen of Hearts...

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...and the Cheshire Cat shows up and antagonizes the Queen, who thinks Alice is the perpetrator, and puts her on trial.

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Alice escapes the court and realizes she has been dreaming this entire time, and wakes up just in time for tea. 

*Score: 7/10*

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PART 2)

I had to add that I really enjoy the colors and animation in this film a lot. The color choices are all very pretty, and I think the way the animators drew the characters and places of Wonderland really makes you believe in this magical land Alice has stumbled upon. This is the first time I've watched this in approximately 10 years, so it was very refreshing to visit Wonderland again after so long. 

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#19: THE STORY OF ROBIN HOOD AND HIS MERRIE MEN (1952) 

Before I begin, I'd like to state that I enjoyed the 1970s animated version more. That being said, this one was only a little over an hour, so it wasn't too difficult to get through. From what I could tell, it seemed to be as historically accurate as possible. There were moments in this that I remembered from reading the book, so I liked how the screenwriters seemed to keep it close to the original story. Richard Todd was a good Robin Hood. I liked him. Maid Marian was annoying. Maybe not so much "annoying" as irritating. Prince John was very obviously evil from the very first moment the audience sees him. Judging from this movie, the rest of the 50s live action movies can either be better or worse. I'm excited to get to the 60s live action films, though. That decade contains some of my favorites. Overall, this one wasn't all that memorable. I was kind of glad when it was over. 

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*Score: 2.5/10* 

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*accidentally skipped "Treasure Island" (1950) so will be going back and watching that and posting my review later.*

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