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NickAndNora34

NickAndNora34's Disney Movie Journey

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On 7/15/2018 at 6:53 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PART 2)

I had to add that I really enjoy the colors and animation in this film a lot. The color choices are all very pretty, and I think the way the animators drew the characters and places of Wonderland really makes you believe in this magical land Alice has stumbled upon. This is the first time I've watched this in approximately 10 years, so it was very refreshing to visit Wonderland again after so long. 

Alice in Wonderland has always been one of my favorite Disney films.  There's an insanity at work in it, a freedom from narrative convention and lesson-learning that makes it stand out from the rest and also keeps the spirit of Lewis Carroll's book despite the many deviations.  Something I noticed only as an adult (or more likely someone pointed out to me) is that for all of the brilliantly popping colors, the backgrounds (including hedges, sky, and castle) during the Queen's croquet game are black and white.

alice-in-wonderland-disneyscreencaps.com

alice-in-wonderland-disneyscreencaps.com

alice-in-wonderland-disneyscreencaps.com

This is a really bizarre and fascinating choice for the 1950s, when Technicolor movies were usually made to be as colorful as possible.  Even Hitchcock was challenged when he suggested Grace Kelly make her entrance in Rear Window in a black-and-white dress.  There are only two brief shots of the cards marching out where the sky is colored.

alice-in-wonderland-disneyscreencaps.com

alice-in-wonderland-disneyscreencaps.com

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4 hours ago, Feego said:

Alice in Wonderland has always been one of my favorite Disney films.  There's an insanity at work in it, a freedom from narrative convention and lesson-learning that makes it stand out from the rest and also keeps the spirit of Lewis Carroll's book despite the many deviations. 

Aside from the 90% text-faithful 1972 Fiona Fullerton/Michael Crawford Alice's Adventures in Wonderland*, Disney's version is probably the best version of Alice on screen, for two reasons:


1) I've never seen an adaptation that makes Alice the most entertaining character in the story. :D  As in the book, most versions have her as the proper little straight-girl, but Disney (who didn't really like the Lewis Carroll story that much) knew that we'd be following her as the "normal" heroine--And both the animation and Kathryn Beaumont's delivery perfectly suggest a slightly playful Alice who wants a bit of silly fun, but develops a comically frustrated slow-burn at just trying to have a straightforward conversation with the Caterpillar or the Mad Hatter.

2) As writer Linda Woolverton demonstrated in the misbegotten Tim Burton version, there are TWO ways to ruin Alice, and they both involve Not Getting the Jokes:  If you can't understand Carroll's sense of logic-twist (like Alice's conversation with the Cheshire Cat) or play at Victorian parody (eg. the Father William poem), there's this overcompensating need to either play the mysterious rubrics about "Muchness and things that begin with an M" as sacred Shakespearean text and hope the audience knows it if you don't, or just throw it all out and make up cutesy crap by yourself.  Most generations I talk to remember the cutesy 80's Irwin Allen TV version, and there was never a worse example of the latter.  (Unless it was Johnny Depp in the Burton movie doing "the Futterwacken Dance"...Since when did we suddenly become Dr. Seuss, Linda??)

What makes the Disney version funny is that they're one of the few film versions in existence that GET THE JOKES.  In the book, it's technically the foggy King of Hearts who says "Begin your story at the beginning...Until you get to the end.  Then stop.", and the Red Queen in "Through the Looking Glass" (who is not the Queen of Hearts, Tim) who says "Lost 'your' way?  All ways here are MY ways!", but a few Disney liberties still managed to give them to appropriate characters and translate them for young ears.

_____

* - That's the second time in three days I've had to cite one of my favorite guilty-pleasures, so rent immediately before I'm forced to do a third.  It only appears in this country as bad 4:3 Nth-generation VHS-source Amazon Prime public-domain kiddy-video, but there's a beautiful widescreen color-restored version for UK satellite-TV that's surfaced on DVD.

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EricJ, I'm very familiar with the 1972 Fullerton version, as that was the first version of Alice in Wonderland I ever saw.  It inspired a life-long love of both the story and various film adaptations.  In addition to these two, I have affectionate memories of Lou Bunin's stop-motion version with Carol Marsh as Alice .  I also enjoy Jan Svankmajer's dark take and Jonathan Miller's somewhat more intellectual (though surprisingly faithful) BBC version from 1966.  But hands down, the Disney version is the one I find most outright enjoyable, and Kathryn Beaumont's performance provides a comforting bit of normalcy amidst all the absurdity.  (I grew up with the Irwin Allen special, and while it's downright embarrassing to watch now, I still have a sentimental attachment to it!)

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2 hours ago, Feego said:

EricJ, I'm very familiar with the 1972 Fullerton version, as that was the first version of Alice in Wonderland I ever saw.  It inspired a life-long love of both the story and various film adaptations. 

There was also a 90% text-faithful '73 BBC version of Through the Looking Glass that's an acceptable Cliff Notes companion piece to the Fullerton version, green-screening the characters onto Tenniel backgrounds.  Not as good looking as the film version or Disney, though.

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NickandNora,

Have you ever read Lewis Carroll's 'Alice' books? I have them but I haven't read them yet.  The movie is so trippy, my favorite part is when Alice meets the flowers.  I love the song that they sing.  Every time I go to Disneyland, I always meet The Queen of Hearts (I don't plan it, it just happens).  Last time I was there, she was out in the seating area near Fantasyland and the Nemo ride.  She was doing a Meet N' Greet with Captain Hook.  The Alice in Wonderland ride and the Madhatter Tea Party teacups are two of my favorite rides at Disneyland.  Since it seems that only moms and little kids (or just the little kids alone) ride the teacups, my husband and I will get in them and he'll get our cup spinning as fast as it can probably go.  That wheel is hard to turn!  The little kids and their moms will try to get their cup spinning, but it's always funny to see the kids looking over and our cup and looking so jealous that we're spinning so fast.  

Alice in Wonderland is a great film.  I love how colorful and weird it is. 

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On 7/20/2018 at 6:35 PM, speedracer5 said:

NickandNora,

Have you ever read Lewis Carroll's 'Alice' books? I have them but I haven't read them yet.  The movie is so trippy, my favorite part is when Alice meets the flowers.  I love the song that they sing.  Every time I go to Disneyland, I always meet The Queen of Hearts (I don't plan it, it just happens).  Last time I was there, she was out in the seating area near Fantasyland and the Nemo ride.  She was doing a Meet N' Greet with Captain Hook.  The Alice in Wonderland ride and the Madhatter Tea Party teacups are two of my favorite rides at Disneyland.  Since it seems that only moms and little kids (or just the little kids alone) ride the teacups, my husband and I will get in them and he'll get our cup spinning as fast as it can probably go.  That wheel is hard to turn!  The little kids and their moms will try to get their cup spinning, but it's always funny to see the kids looking over and our cup and looking so jealous that we're spinning so fast.  

Alice in Wonderland is a great film.  I love how colorful and weird it is. 

I believe I read the first installment several years ago, but it's on my list to re-read them! 

I don't believe I have met the Queen of Hearts (in recent years) so I'd like to keep an eye out for her when I go next month. 

Ditto on the teacups. My father always used to spin my brothers and me crazy fast in those. I'm surprised none of us got sick. But then again, my youngest brother never gets dizzy.  

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3 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

I believe I read the first installment several years ago, but it's on my list to re-read them! 

I don't believe I have met the Queen of Hearts (in recent years) so I'd like to keep an eye out for her when I go next month. 

Ditto on the teacups. My father always used to spin my brothers and me crazy fast in those. I'm surprised none of us got sick. But then again, my youngest brother never gets dizzy.  

I'm jealous that you're going to Disneyland next month! My husband and I want to go back, but we're going to wait a few years.  Star Wars Land opens next year and we're hoping to visit when some of the hoopla has gone down a little bit.  Our goal is to go back for our 10th wedding anniversary, which will be in 2021.  It's like 3 years away, but I'm sure that it'll be here before we know it.  Next time, we're going all out and saving up so that we can stay on property--I'm thinking at the Disneyland Hotel since it's the original one.  I want to get the full immersive Disney experience.  Lol. We usually go in September, because that's when our anniversary is, but next time we're going to go at a different time of the year.  Haunted Mansion is always closed because they're installing the "Nightmare Before Christmas" overlay.  We want to go to the park when it is just regular Disney and there are no Halloween decorations.  I'm thinking maybe we'll go in April or something. 

We just went this past September and there was a big Beauty and the Beast and Coco promotion.  We saw Belle and Beast walking around multiple times and went to the Red Rose Tavern which replaced the Pinocchio restaurant in Fantasyland.  The Red Rose Tavern was supposed to be temporary, but I liked it better! Have you tried "the grey stuff" ? It was delicious!

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5 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I'm jealous that you're going to Disneyland next month! My husband and I want to go back, but we're going to wait a few years.  Star Wars Land opens next year and we're hoping to visit when some of the hoopla has gone down a little bit.  Our goal is to go back for our 10th wedding anniversary, which will be in 2021.  It's like 3 years away, but I'm sure that it'll be here before we know it.  Next time, we're going all out and saving up so that we can stay on property--I'm thinking at the Disneyland Hotel since it's the original one.  I want to get the full immersive Disney experience.  Lol. We usually go in September, because that's when our anniversary is, but next time we're going to go at a different time of the year.  Haunted Mansion is always closed because they're installing the "Nightmare Before Christmas" overlay.  We want to go to the park when it is just regular Disney and there are no Halloween decorations.  I'm thinking maybe we'll go in April or something. 

We just went this past September and there was a big Beauty and the Beast and Coco promotion.  We saw Belle and Beast walking around multiple times and went to the Red Rose Tavern which replaced the Pinocchio restaurant in Fantasyland.  The Red Rose Tavern was supposed to be temporary, but I liked it better! Have you tried "the grey stuff" ? It was delicious!

Yeah! It's one of the perks of living in CA... I'm going to have some time off from work (I'm a nanny) as they are going to have another kid soon, so I thought I would go a couple times while I have that time off. I'm currently saving for a pass, as I know I will use it many, many times. And yes, Star Wars Land is going to be a madhouse. When I was a cast member in FL, I was there for the opening night of the new fireworks, and even then I wanted to pull my hair out. So, it's probably a good idea for you guys to wait a little while before going on vacation. 

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#17: TREASURE ISLAND (1950) 

Yet another Bobby Driscoll Disney movie. I'm not complaining, just an observation. At least he's a better actor than other Disney favorite, Luana Patten.

It ends up being a pretty eventful day for young Jim Hawkins while his mother is off in town. A stranger with a scar shows up at Jim's mother's tavern/inn looking for an ex-pirate named Billy Bones, and then a blind man shows up and hands Bones a piece of paper with a black spot on it. Apparently, this means that the pirate crew is going to kill Bones, so he gives Jim a treasure map after he is taken ill and dies (evidently, he is suffering from some kind of disease).

Jim goes for help, and brings back these two men (they appear to be fairly upstanding citizens of the village). One of the men, Trelawney, decides to hire a ship and crew to go search for the treasure (Jim also gets to go on the voyage) so they can all "share" in it. Right… Somehow, I don't trust this man. I guess movies have taught me to be wary of white-wigged, fat Englishmen.

John Silver, some dude in the town who runs a sort of restaurant, feeds some of the men (and Jim) before the voyage. He and Jim quickly become friends. 

I don't want to include all of the plot, since I don't want to spoil anything for anyone. Although, a lot of you may be familiar with the novel. Also, I just remembered that this is a remake of the Jackie Cooper version from the 30s. 

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This movie is boring, I have to say. And I usually love 50s movies. I don’t know what it is about all these live action movies from the 40s/50s, but they are not all that entertaining. Heck, I'd rather watch an Adam Sandler movie than this. I can’t stand him in the majority of the things he's in, but at least I'd be somewhat entertained.

*sorry if this is confusing; I had to go back and watch this one since I forgot about it. 

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*Score: 3.5/10*

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32 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

#17: TREASURE ISLAND (1950)* Score: 1/5 

Yet another Bobby Driscoll Disney movie. I'm not complaining, just an observation.

Just wait till you get to Peter Pan, next on the animated list.  (For which, to be fair, Bobby retired the jersey.)

And might want to go back and compare Disney's "the" Treasure Island by the time when/if you get to "Treasure Planet" from '02.  Neither one can be called perfect, but the '50 version gets points just for Robert Newton as Long John Silver--

How iconic/influential was Newton?:  When you go "Arr, matey" on Talk Like a Pirate Day, 90% chance you're imitating his Silver.

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#20: PETER PAN (1953) 

Wendy tells her brothers stories about Peter Pan, and seems to be a great older sister. Their father detests these stories and decides to move Wendy out of the nursery and into her own bedroom as she is growing older. The siblings all get super upset about this, but really, it's nothing to cry over. She's just moving down the hall. She'll still be there everyday to tell her brothers stories. It's not that big of a deal.

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Captain Hook's main goal in life is to seek revenge on his arch-nemesis, Peter Pan. Peter cut off Hook's left hand and fed it to the only crocodile in Neverland (apparently). Hook kidnaps a couple girls (Tiger Lily, the Native American princess & Tinkerbell) to try to coax the information about Peter's whereabouts out of them.

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Meanwhile, the Lost Boys, Peter, and the Darling children get kidnapped by the Native tribe and start to go crazy (for lack of a better phrase). It's actually quite depressing that the Lost Boys have no recollection of their mothers. They've been living wild in Neverland for several years. It's sad.

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After Peter Pan banishes Tinkerbell for forever (more like a week), she goes to Hook and tells him Peter's location. Hook kidnaps all the Lost Boys and the Darling children and leaves a bomb in the hideout. Tink manages to escape the cage Hook has locked her up in, and she goes to warn Peter and gets injured in the blast. She then tells Peter to go rescue the kids from Hook before he forces them to choose between joining his pirate crew and walking the plank.

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Peter and Hook end up fighting, and spoiler alert: Peter wins. The ship is then covered in pixie dust and flies to London to return the  children to their home. Their father is resolved to become a better person. 

Hans Conreid (as Captain Hook) did a fantastic job. His voice acting for this seemed to come so naturally to him. He will probably always be one of my favorite Disney villains; his lines and delivery are hilarious.

*There are definitely moments in this that people these days would call "stereotypes." I'm speaking in reference to the Native Americans. They have a whole song called "What Makes the Red Man Red" and they call them "Redskins." I find it a tad bit offensive. I just feel like people shouldn't be referred to by their perceived skin color.  Of course, I understand this was the time period, and I am an avid advocate of not attempting to erase/change history because that is wrong.

*This one is and will always be enjoyable to me. It was nice re-watching this after so many years. 

*Score: 7/10*

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#21: THE SWORD AND THE ROSE (1953) 

Starring: Richard Todd, Glynis Johns, & James Robertson Justice. 

Johns is most recognizable to me as Mrs. Banks in Disney's "Mary Poppins" as well as the Grandmother in "While You Were Sleeping." I love Johns' speaking voice. It's very flute-like (a la Jean Arthur/Myrna Loy). Justice is most recognizable to me as Lord Scrumptious in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968).

The film starts out with all these men boxing/wrestling. They're fighting to please their king or something. The film centers around Mary Tudor, King Henry the 8th's younger sister (Johns & Justice, respectively). Long story short: she falls in love with a man whom she is not betrothed to, and ends up weaseling her way out of a loveless marriage in order to marry for love. 

This was probably one of the most lame, dull movies I've ever had the "privilege" of watching. Apparently, when this movie was released, it did terribly at the box office, and the next film in the lineup, Rob Roy the Highland Rogue also did terribly, which caused Disney to rethink their costume films (Thank God). 

Here is the link to the summary (small spoilers) on the film's Wikipedia page. I'm worried that I'll forget some of the details since I didn't pay very close attention to the film's plot, and I'll be d***ed if I have to go back and watch any of this over again in order to get the information right. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sword_and_the_Rose 

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*Score: 2.5/10*

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#21: THE SWORD AND THE ROSE (1953) Part 2 

*The full movie is on YouTube for free if anyone is brave enough to watch it. 

 

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#22: ROB ROY, THE HIGHLAND ROGUE (1954) 

Appears to be almost exactly the same as its antecedent, "The Sword and the Rose" (1953). This film is made up of virtually the same cast: Richard Todd, Glynis Johns, & James Robertson Justice. And if that's not enough, they are all essentially portraying the same types of characters as well. 

Everyone's "Scottish" accents are simply atrocious. I can't do better, I'll admit, but I'd rather they just all spoke with English accents like American films set in foreign countries do now. It would be a lot easier on the ears. 

This film is set in the early 1700's, and focuses on Rob Roy MacGregor, a Scottish outlaw who leads a rebellion against King George 1st. Rob Roy then goes back to his town to get married to his fiance, and then does a lot more "outlawing" and a lot more fighting. Another rather bland costume film. I'm glad this is the last for a little while of those. 

'In The New York Times, Bosley Crowther described it as "a fine lot of fighting among the hills, shooting of rifles, banging of claymores, skirling of pipes and buzzing of burrs, filmed and recorded in color on the actual Scottish countryside. And while Mr. Todd is not precisely the Rob Roy that history records, he is indeed a satisfactory fabrication until a better Rob Roy comes along." *This is too much praise for what my eyes just witnessed. 

Image result for rob roy the highland rogue   Above: Richard Todd on set in full costume. 

*Score: 2.5/10*

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9 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

#22: ROB ROY, THE HIGHLAND ROGUE (1954) Score: 1/5 

Appears to be almost exactly the same as its antecedent, "The Sword and the Rose" (1953). This film is made up of virtually the same cast: Richard Todd, Glynis Johns, & James Robertson Justice. And if that's not enough, they are all essentially portraying the same types of characters as well. 

Right now, you're in the same live-action Treasure Island/Story of Robin Hood phase where Walt couldn't get his overseas money out of postwar England, and said, "Well, let's spend it there!" on a series of live-action English classics on location.  Which helped develop the live-action division in time for the Disneyland series to come along.

So if the early ones look like they were made in bulk, most of them were.

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#23: 20,000 LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA (1954)

Starring: James Mason, Kirk Douglas, Peter Lorre, Paul Lukas. 

Live-action film adaptation of Jules Verne's classic novel; I enjoyed all the aforementioned actors in this. Kirk stars as Ned Land, a sailor, Lukas stars as Professor Pierre Aronnax, and Lorre stars as Conseil (Aronnax's man-servant). From re-reading a portion of the book recently, the casting choices were fairly on point. 

To refresh everyone's memories, some kind of elusive "animal" is repeatedly sighted throughout the ocean by several ships' sailors/passengers, so a group of able-bodied men is assembled to destroy the creature since it has proven to be a threat to seafaring citizens. 

The crew of the ship ultimately finds the creature, but they are unsuccessful in detaining it before it begins ramming the ship. In the chaos, Ned, Aronnax, and Conseil are thrown overboard, and end up finding refuge on the top of the machine. They are allowed inside the machine (the Nautilus), and meet Captain Nemo (Mason). It is soon evident that Nemo is a multi-faceted man; many might call him an anti-hero of sorts. He seems to have few to no scruples about destroying ships of men due to issues that occurred in his past. 

I enjoyed this one significantly more than some of the previous movies I've watched for this challenge (I'm looking at you, Sword and the Rose). 

P.S. Kirk Douglas really pulls off the whole sailor look, in my opinion. 

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Above: behind the scenes of filming the movie 

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*Score: 5.5/10*

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#24: DAVY CROCKETT, KING OF THE WILD FRONTIER (1955) 

This stars Fess Parker as the titular character. The film is comprised of the first three episodes of the Disney TV show: "Davy Crockett Indian Fighter" (Dec 15, 1954), "Davy Crockett Goes to Congress" (Jan 26, 1955), and "davy Crockett at the Alamo" (Feb 23, 1955).

The plot centers around Davy Crockett and his friend, George Russell. They volunteer for General Andrew Jackson and end up winning the battle, so they return home. George gets kidnapped by a Native tribe, and it's up to Davy to rescue his friend. George and Davy then go off again, and Davy gets word that his wife has died. In the meantime, Davy runs for Congress and wins. 

The film was most assuredly a success and RACCOON skin caps became very popular among young boys. Disney then decided to do another Davy Crockett film (this time a prequel) a year later. I'm not that wild about this one, but it was much better than The Sword and the Rose (1953) and Rob Roy, the Highland Rogue (1954). 

Image result for davy crockett king of the wild frontier

Image result for davy crockett king of the wild frontier

Image result for davy crockett king of the wild frontier

*Score: 5/10*

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#25: LADY AND THE TRAMP (1955)

This opens with another one of those choral overtures (the song that is sung is "Bella Notte"). The film stars Barbara Luddy as Lady (she was in her 40s when this was released), Larry Roberts as Tramp, Verna Felton (Disney favorite) as Aunt Sarah, and Peggy Lee as an astounding 4 characters: Darling, Si and Am (the Siamese cats), and Peg (3 of which are animals). The protagonist, Lady, is the apple of her owners' eyes until Darling becomes pregnant. Tramp warns Lady about the perils a baby can bring. 

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The remainder of the film deals with Lady being neglected and running off with Tramp and exploring the city she lives in. I have fond memories of this movie. I loved it as a child. I appreciate the effort to show this from a dog's perspective: the animators drew only the bottom halves of all the human characters (for the most part). 

Image result for lady and the tramp 1955 behind the scenes

Image result for lady and the tramp 1955 behind the scenes

The Mellomen singing/recording their parts for "He's a Tramp." 

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George Givot and Bill Thompson rehearsing their "Bella Notte" number. 

*Score: 6/10*

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#26: THE LITTLEST OUTLAW (1955)

Starring: Pedro Armendariz, Joseph Calleia, Rodolfo Acosta, and introducing Andres Velasques. 

It was my first time watching this, so I had no idea what to expect. Velasques stars as Pablito, the son of a horse trainer who uses questionable methods to train these horses. Pablito's father agrees to train one of the Army general's horses for a race. The cruelty shown to the horse results in the horse's refusal to jump, and he is scheduled to be put down after there is an accident. The accident is not the horse's fault, it's the trainer's fault for making him afraid. 

Pablito escapes with the horse and becomes a fugitive from the law. The two aren't exactly conspicuous. 

This one was another rather dull movie. At least, Velasques was a fairly decent actor. Better than Luana Patten, that's for damn sure. That's an hour and 12 minutes I'll never get back. 

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*Score: 3.5/10*

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#27: THE GREAT LOCOMOTIVE CHASE (1956) 

Opens on a red book of the same name (by William Pittenger, a member of the Andrews Raiders). 

About two minutes and 16 seconds in, you can see Claude Jarman, Jr. as one of the Raiders. I had no idea he was was in this; I thought he looked familiar, checked IMDb, and whattaya know. Also, I guess Walt really liked Fess Parker. I can list off at least 4 movies he was in from the 50s. 

The film takes place during the Civil War (you can tell right off since some of the men start talking about the "Union" and the "Confederacy"). Parker plays Andrews, a real hot-shot soldier whose goal is to sabotage the railroad or something to hurt the Confederate Army. Andrews corrals about 10-15 Yankee soldiers to help him with his mission. A few of them and Andrews end up at an inn due to the river being flooded. It's interesting to me how the film portrayed the division among all the states. The Yankees and the Confederates really appeared to hate each other. 

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*Score: 4/10*

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5 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

#27: THE GREAT LOCOMOTIVE CHASE (1956) Score: 2.5/5 

Opens on a red book of the same name (by William Pittenger, a member of the Andrews Raiders). 

About two minutes and 16 seconds in, you can see Claude Jarman, Jr. as one of the Raiders. I had no idea he was was in this; I thought he looked familiar, checked IMDb, and whattaya know. Also, I guess Walt really liked Fess Parker. I can list off at least 4 he was in from the 50s. 

The film takes place during the Civil War (you can tell right off since some of the men start talking about the "Union" and the "Confederacy"). Parker plays Andrews, a real hot-shot soldier whose goal is to sabotage the railroad or something to hurt the Confederate Army. Andrews corrals about 10-15 Yankee soldiers to help him with his mission. A few of them and Andrews end up at an inn due to the river being flooded. It's interesting to me how the film portrayed the division among all the states. The Yankees and the Confederates really appeared to hate each other. 

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Image result for the great locomotive chase 1956

 

I enjoyed this one when I was a kid also. I was fascinated with any films that had steam locomotives. 

I'll relate a story, when I was three I took a train journey to Washington D.C. I was a kid, I liked toy trains. I enjoyed watching out the window of the passenger car as we traveled South. The most impressive/frightening and very loud things I saw were the huge steam locomotives pulling freight drags that rushed up along the tracks and passed along side the windows going the opposite direction. Of course the experience only lasted a second or two, but it's something you'll never forget if you experience it. 

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17 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

#25: LADY AND THE TRAMP (1955) Score: 3.5/5 

The protagonist, Lady, is the apple of her owners' eyes until Darling becomes pregnant. 

And, of course, she's not the only one...  ;)

Ever wonder how we got from this:

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To this:

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To this:

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with Jock & Trusty asking who's going to do the "right thing" for that little matter that no one wants to talk about, and that Lady is in tears over after hearing about Tramp's love life in the dog pound?

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#28: DAVY CROCKETT AND THE RIVER PIRATES (1956) 

Fess Parker stars once again as Davy Crockett. He's accompanied once again by Buddy Ebsen and Jeff York. This film is comprised of the television episodes, "Davy Crockett's Keelboat Race (Nov 16 1955)" and "Davy Crockett and the River Pirates (Dec 14 1955)." 

Davy and George meet a keelboat captain named Mike Fink, who tries to extort them after they ask for a ride on his boat in order to get home. George and Fink agree to a boat-race, and George's pelts and Fink's whiskey are placed as wagers. Obviously, George and Davy win the race, and they then try to buy horses from a friendly Chickasaw Indian, but end up getting captured by one of the tribes. The Chief and the rest of his tribe are sick and tired of dealing with white men. Meanwhile, Davy figures out that there are pirates stealing and causing other mischief, while disguising themselves as Natives, and the Chief lets them go so they can arrest the pirates and bring them to justice. 

Fairly straight-forward movie, that's why I don't have much to say about it. 

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*Score: 3/10*

Edited by NickAndNora34
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#29: WESTWARD HO, THE WAGONS! (1956) 

Starring: Fess Parker (surprise, surprise), Jeff York, Kathleen Crowley, Sebastian Cabot, Cubby O'Brien (Mouseketeer), Tommy Cole (another Mouseketeer), Doreen Tracey (another Mouseketeer), George Reeves (his final film), & Iron Eyes Cody. 

The film opens with a chorus singing the theme song, and a shot of a bunch of covered wagons driving across the prairie. Evidently, they are headed for Oregon. Just from the opening,  I could tell that this was going to be another difficult-to-get-through live action 50s movie. I'm not generally a fan of Westerns, so I think that's probably it... I enjoy things like "Old Yeller" a lot more, most likely because the source material is much more substantial. 

The wagon party awakens one morning to find some of their horses have been stolen. Parker and this kid named Dan go off and find the horses, and are almost attacked by the Natives, but ultimately escape. Upon their return, the group has a little dancing party and Parker sings one of his little Western ballads. 

Not the worst thing I've ever watched, but not one of the best either. At least Luana Patten was nowhere to be seen. 

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*Score: 4/10*

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