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NickAndNora34

NickAndNora34's Disney Movie Journey

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#59: SAVAGE SAM (1963) *Score: 3/5*

Starring: Tommy Kirk, Kevin Corcoran, Brian Keith, Jeff York, Royal Dano. 

The sequel to "Old Yeller" (1957) reunites most of the cast members from the first installment, and is genuinely still enjoyable. Travis and Arliss (Kirk and Corcoran) are left alone on their farm while their parents visit the boys' sick grandmother. Arliss, Travis, and Travis' friend, Lisbeth, are all captured by a tribe of Apaches, and the majority of the plot deals with their uncle and his posse in their attempts to rescue the kids. 

I've always had a fondness for these books/movies, as they were some of my father's favorites, and he shared them with us kids when we were young. I remember watching "Old Yeller" in particular several times throughout my childhood. This is an enjoyable sequel for sure. 

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#60: SUMMER MAGIC (1963) *Score: 3.5/5*

Starring: Dorothy McGuire, Hayley Mills, Eddie Hodges, Burl Ives, Deborah Walley, Una Merkel. 

After widow McGuire sells the family house and most of their possessions, the whole family moves to the country for a change of scenery, and are immediately met with a huge culture shock. The family pours a lot of their time into fixing up their new (old) country-house, and along the way, they start to make friends and fit into their new, small country town. 

I like Hayley Mills, and she was charming, as per usual... The music was really cute, too. Some of you may be familiar with "Ugly Bug Ball," which is quite catchy, and refused to leave my head several days after I watched this movie. The entire cast was great, honestly. One of the more enjoyable vintage live-action films in Disney's repertoire, for sure. 

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23 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

#60: SUMMER MAGIC (1963) *Score: 3.5/5*

Starring: Dorothy McGuire, Hayley Mills, Eddie Hodges, Burl Ives, Deborah Walley, Una Merkel. 

After widow McGuire sells the family house and most of their possessions, the whole family moves to the country for a change of scenery, and are immediately met with a huge culture shock. The family pours a lot of their time into fixing up their new (old) country-house, and along the way, they start to make friends and fit into their new, small country town. 

I like Hayley Mills, and she was charming, as per usual... The music was really cute, too. Some of you may be familiar with "Ugly Bug Ball," which is quite catchy, and refused to leave my head several days after I watched this movie. The entire cast was great, honestly. One of the more enjoyable vintage live-action films in Disney's repertoire, for sure. 

 

I love this movie! I'm glad you enjoyed it. 

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#61: THE INCREDIBLE JOURNEY (1962) *Score: 3/5*

I was unaware this even existed, before last year... I had only ever seen the 90's remake when I was younger. It's a very similar story; family goes out of town, and the animals think they've been forgotten, so they make the trek across treacherous territory in an attempt to be reunited with their owners. 

If I'm being honest, I enjoy the 90's remake more. You can't go wrong with the voices of Don Ameche, Michael J. Fox, and Sally Field... This one was still enjoyable enough, but it definitely dragged in some scenes. 

I don't have a whole lot to say about this one. 

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15 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

#61: THE INCREDIBLE JOURNEY (1962) *Score: 3/5*

I was unaware this even existed, before last year... I had only ever seen the 90's remake when I was younger. It's a very similar story; family goes out of town, and the animals think they've been forgotten, so they make the trek across treacherous territory in an attempt to be reunited with their owners. 

If I'm being honest, I enjoy the 90's remake more. You can't go wrong with the voices of Don Ameche, Michael J. Fox, and Sally Field... This one was still enjoyable enough, but it definitely dragged in some scenes. 

I don't have a whole lot to say about this one. 

Image result for the incredible journey 1963

I haven't seen the original film either, but I have seen both the remake and the sequel! Since I don't have a soul, I do not cry at movies. But I do feel more emotionally affected (but not crying) by sad animal movies more than sad people movies.  The end of Homeward Bound when Shadow tells Chance to go on without him, I'll admit that I got a little misty-eyed, and then they get home and reunite with the family, then you think Shadow died, (and my misty eyes may have turned into being slightly teary-eyed) but then! he makes his epic entrance, then I was relieved. 

This is one of the few films that I actually got a little choked up at.  I can't bring myself to watch Old Yeller, because I know what happens to Old Yeller and I don't want to deal with it. 

EDIT: Ugh. After that, I didn't even ask you my original question:

Do the animals talk in the original film?

Edited by speedracer5
Forgot to get to the point and state my actual question
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3 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I haven't seen the original film either, but I have seen both the remake and the sequel! Since I don't have a soul, I do not cry at movies. But I do feel more emotionally affected (but not crying) by sad animal movies more than sad people movies.  The end of Homeward Bound when Shadow tells Chance to go on without him, I'll admit that I got a little misty-eyed, and then they get home and reunite with the family, then you think Shadow died, (and my misty eyes may have turned into being slightly teary-eyed) but then! he makes his epic entrance, then I was relieved. 

This is one of the few films that I actually got a little choked up at.  I can't bring myself to watch Old Yeller, because I know what happens to Old Yeller and I don't want to deal with it. 

EDIT: Ugh. After that, I didn't even ask you my original question:

Do the animals talk in the original film?

I don't really cry at movies either, but I'll admit the original makes me a little emotional haha. 

And no, the animals don't speak in the original. Kind of disappointing, but understandable. 

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3 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

I don't really cry at movies either, but I'll admit the original makes me a little emotional haha. 

And no, the animals don't speak in the original. Kind of disappointing, but understandable. 

I feel like without talking animals that this may come across more as a nature movie.  Like The Adventures of Milo and Otis which I literally haven't watched since I was in preschool in the late-80s.  I can't remember whether Milo and Otis talk in that film either.

Did you watch this on Disney+ ? I think I saw this film on there??

Speaking of Disney+... have you started watching the Imagineering documentary yet? If not, it's really good. I'm waiting for episode 3 to drop.

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32 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I can't remember whether Milo and Otis talk in that film either.

No. Dudley Moore narrates it. He does talk for Milo and Otis and sings.

I don't cry, just save up a big snort. My allergies do kick up really bad.

I must say animal movies seem harder than people. With animals, I forget it's a movie.

Eight Below is very good. I rented it new on DVD. I'm sure it is beautiful in HD. It does get sad, but since speedracer5 and NickAndNora34 don't cry at movies, it may be okay.

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In sad people movies, I'm like: "well that's a bummer." 

Sad animal movies, I'm saying: "don't kill the animal. Don't kill the animal." and then the animal dies, I'm like "awww."

Right now I'll be hacking at all movies, funny or sad, because my cold is getting worse instead of improving.

Good thing I don't live in an old movie, otherwise people would think I had consumption. 

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9 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I feel like without talking animals that this may come across more as a nature movie.  Like The Adventures of Milo and Otis which I literally haven't watched since I was in preschool in the late-80s.  I can't remember whether Milo and Otis talk in that film either.

Did you watch this on Disney+ ? I think I saw this film on there??

Speaking of Disney+... have you started watching the Imagineering documentary yet? If not, it's really good. I'm waiting for episode 3 to drop.

I didn't. I checked out the DVD from my public library before Disney Plus even launched... There's a good selection of live action films from Disney's repertoire on there, though. 

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I ALWAYS tear up at animal death within a film. Heck, I still tear up when Audrey Hepburn hears Cat's meek meow in the rainy ally in BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S!

13 hours ago, Dr. Somnambula said:

Eight Below is very good.

I agree- very good film.

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6 hours ago, sagebrush said:

I ALWAYS tear up at animal death within a film. Heck, I still tear up when Audrey Hepburn hears Cat's meek meow in the rainy ally in BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S!

I agree- very good film.

I'm always mad at Audrey Hepburn for throwing Cat out in the alley.  I am thankful when Fred Baby gets out of the car to save Cat.  Then I'm relieved (and still mad at Audrey) when Cat meows.

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#63: THE SWORD IN THE STONE (1963) *Score: 3.5/5*

This is a fanciful animated adaptation of the popular "King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table" stories. It centers around Wart, a kitchen boy, who befriends Merlin the sorcerer and his owl, Archimedes. The king has recently died and left no heir; a sword in a stone appears, and states that whomever is able to pull the sword out of the stone, will be the new king. 

Image result for sword in the stone 1963

I always enjoyed this as a kid. There's just something about Disney's 2D animated movies that is so visually appealing to me. I love the colors and art styles. There really isn't much of a plot to this, but it's still pretty entertaining. 

Image result for sword in the stone 1963

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14 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

#62: THE SWORD IN THE STONE (1963) *Score: 3.5/5*

There really isn't much of a plot to this, but it's still pretty entertaining. 

Although the sad story was that Walt was starting to lose interest in animated features by the mid-60's--the bloom had been off the rose ever since the 40's Strike, and he was too caught up with "building" stories for the World's Fair and his new California toy--and he handed the project to his best story man, Bill Peet, to handle overseeing.  You're right, there's NOT much plot to it, and story-stickler Walt was reportedly so outraged, he fired Peet and was determined to get back to hands-on involvement with their next project.

Which, as luck would have it, would be finally getting the go-ahead on "Mary Poppins"...

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On 11/21/2019 at 11:54 AM, NickAndNora34 said:

#62: THE SWORD IN THE STONE (1963) *Score: 3.5/5*

This is a fanciful animated adaptation of the popular "King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table" stories. It centers around Wart, a kitchen boy, who befriends Merlin the sorcerer and his owl, Archimedes. The king has recently died and left no heir; a sword in a stone appears, and states that whomever is able to pull the sword out of the stone, will be the new king. 

I always enjoyed this as a kid. There's just something about Disney's 2D animated movies that is so visually appealing to me. I love the colors and art styles. There really isn't much of a plot to this, but it's still pretty entertaining. 

I love The Sword In The Stone especially the magnificent, marvelous mad Madam Mim!

Sorry for the pan-and-scan video. The only widescreen versions I could find were not in English.

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On 11/21/2019 at 12:54 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

Image result for sword in the stone 1963

There's just something about Disney's 2D animated movies that is so visually appealing to me. I love the colors and art styles.

I dislike the shift to the bright, saturated colors Disney starting using in the 50's, much preferring the subtler, more natural colors used in the earlier films. I do like however, the more angular stylized style I think was first seen in SLEEPING BEAUTY- the Disney style of charactors before that was more doll like cutie. 

It's visually interesting when Disney 2d animation shift drawing styles, like 101 DALMATIONS has a "hand drawn" feeling with some night sets becoming toned outlines.

Some animation studios feel their "look" is their trademark and never changed, like Gibli.

Omigod that Mad Madam Mim clip! AMAZING! 

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#62: THE THREE LIVES OF THOMASINA (1963) *Score: 3/5* (this one was supposed to come before Sword in the Stone, oops)

Starring: Patrick McGoohan, Karen Dotrice, Matthew Garber, Susan Hampshire, Laurence Naismith, Jean Anderson, Vincent Winter, Finlay Currie.

Karen Dotrice (of Mary Poppins) stars as Mary McDhui, a little girl who is devoted to her ginger cat, Thomasina. The pair of them go everywhere and do almost everything together; however, tragedy strikes, and Mary's father, the local veterinarian, has to make a difficult decision, leaving Mary emotionally distraught and distant towards him. Mary's friends try to cheer her up, but to no avail. Mary even goes so far as to say that her father is dead; that's how upset she is with him. I was unprepared for the story to take such a dark turn... 

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One thing that struck me as humorous, was the fact that there was a young, single woman whom everyone in the town dubbed "a witch" because she was unmarried and lived in the woods and healed wildlife. The village children are all terrified of her, which is somewhat hysterical to watch. 

Image result for three lives of thomasina

(It was hard to find some clear photos for this so bear with me)

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#64: THE MOON SPINNERS (1964) *Score: 3/5*

Starring: Hayley Mills, Eli Wallach, Peter McEnery, Joan Greenwood, Irene Papas, Pola Negri, Sheila Hancock. 

Image result for the moon spinners 1964

Hayley Mills stars as a young woman named Nicki, on vacation in Crete with her aunt, a musicologist who is researching different types of music around the world. The two of them decide to stay at a quaint seaside hotel called "The Moon-Spinners Hotel," thinking that their vacation will be filled with peace and quiet, but fate has other plans for them. Nicki and her new friend, Mark (another English patron of the hotel), stumble upon some shady dealings, and try to unravel the mystery surrounding the hotel and its owners, while trying to stay alive. As I was watching this, it occurred to me that this felt almost like a "Charade" (1963) for children. Naturally, I wouldn't say that this was ultimately stronger than "Charade," but it had the same overall feeling to it. 

Image result for the moon spinners 1964

Overall, this was entertaining enough. Not one I would care to revisit anytime soon, but it was much better than all those costume pictures I suffered through earlier on in the year. 

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#65: THE MISADVENTURES OF MERLIN JONES (1964) *Score: 1/5*

Starring: Tommy Kirk, Annette Funicello, Leon Ames, Stuart Erwin, Alan Hewitt, Connie Gilchrist. 

Image result for misadventures of merlin jones

This was a bland story about a college student named Merlin Jones, who is an inventor/scientist. Merlin strives to be taken seriously by the rest of the student body and staff at his school, but he is constantly branded a fool. Along with his girlfriend (played by Annette), he proceeds to make scientific discoveries and successfully navigate his college life. I think Merlin was supposed to be a sympathetic character, but I honestly couldn't feel anything positive towards him. He seemed like an annoying know-it-all throughout the entirety of the film; especially during the court scenes. 

I don't have much to say about this, since I didn't like it all that much. 

 

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On 7/14/2018 at 12:51 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

#16: CINDERELLA (1950)

I remember first watching this one when I was very young. It was one of my favorites then, and is one of my favorites now. The choral opening is quite lovely, and I am enamored of this tradition in some of the older animated classics (i.e. Lady and the Tramp & Sleeping Beauty). There is also a storybook opening, which is the same for "Snow White" and "Sleeping Beauty." 

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The first song the audience is introduced to is "A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes." Cinderella sings this after being awakened by her mouse and bird friends. Cinderella is interrupted by her stepsisters and stepmother ringing the bells and shouting. It's really too bad that once Cinderella's father died, she became an indentured servant whose only friends are rats and vermin. Quick question: Was Cinderella actually able to speak to and understand these animals, or was she so starved for normal human interaction that she imagined they were really talking to her?

Image result for cinderella 1950

You also know the Tremaines are evil, because they named their cat "Lucifer." Lucifer is also downright mean, but to be fair, he is constantly harassed by the excessive amount of rodents that have practically taken over the home. 

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Another thing I find interesting is that the King doesn't actually seem to care which woman his son marries so long as he gets a few grandkids out of it. Despite my somewhat pessimistic words, I do very much enjoy the story, songs, and characters. Some of my favorite animation pieces from this, are the parts where Cinderella's shredded pink gown gets transformed into her iconic white ballgown, and where the fat mouse, Gus Gus (which is somehow short for Octavius), tries to carry more corn than is physically possible for a mouse to carry (regardless of stomach size). Another that comes to mind is the "Oh Sing Sweet Nightingale" scene in which Cinderella is washing the floor, and her image appears in all the bubbles. 

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Image result for cinderella 1950 oh sing sweet nightingale gif

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*Score: 8/10*

💙 👗👛I love Cinderella! It is my favorite Disney film (live or animated, always has been since I first saw it at probably 3 or 4 years old)! Thank you for sharing with us about all the Disney films.  Fun facts: (1) the dress change from her ripped dress to her ballgown was Walt Disney's favorite piece of animation, (2) Cinderella and Alice in Wonderland were being made at the same time, Walt Disney made it a competition between the two groups, whoever finished first, their film was released first, (3) Cinderella saved the Walt Disney company from bankruptcy, with the profits from the film, Walt Disney started his Disneyland Park Project, (4) There is always debate as to when this particular version of Cinderella is supposed to take place. Some people say late 1600s, other say sometime during the 1700s, but many think it's between 1860-1880s due to gaslights, the clothing, etc. 

 

Thank you again for the Disney Forum NickandNora!

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#66: A TIGER WALKS (1964) *Score: 2/5* 

Starring: Brian Keith, Vera Miles, Pamela Franklin, Kevin Corcoran, Sabu, Una Merkel, Connie Gilchrist. 

After one of the tigers in a traveling circus escapes due to one of the trainer's foolishness, the small town's inhabitants are plagued with fear that the tiger will attack them, their families, or their animals. The sheriff then enlists the help of several of the townsmen to help him try to capture the tiger, and bring it back to the circus. Further conflicts arise once the Sheriff's daughter is interviewed on television, where she makes her opinions known: she wants people to bring the tiger back alive, instead of the alternative, which is to shoot and kill it. The sheriff and his daughter have differing opinions when it comes to the tiger, so there's that extra layer of conflict in the movie. 

Image result for a tiger walks 1964

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#67: MARY POPPINS (1964) *Score: 4/5* 

Starring: Julie Andrews, Dick Van Dyke, David Tomlinson, Glynis Johns, Reta Shaw, Hermione Baddeley, Karen Dotrice, Matthew Garber, Ed Wynn. 

I don't think I need to describe the plot of this one to anyone here. I think we're all familiar with it. 

This is one of my most favorite Disney films. Director Robert Stevenson finally directed a live-action Disney movie I actually love. 
Image result for mary poppins 1964

**I haven't allowed myself to rewatch this since I started this whole Disney challenge. How's that for self control?**

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While I like Mary Poppins, I think the Hayley Mills Disney films are my absolute favorite of all the live-action Disney movies.  Those, and The Ugly Dachshund

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2 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

While I like Mary Poppins, I think the Hayley Mills Disney films are my absolute favorite of all the live-action Disney movies.  Those, and The Ugly Dachshund

Interesting. I like her movies, don't love them though... But "Ugly Dachshund" is another favorite of mine. It's very enjoyable.

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11 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Interesting. I like her movies, don't love them though... But "Ugly Dachshund" is another favorite of mine. It's very enjoyable.

I think it might be a nostalgia thing for me.  I believe that The Parent Trap might have been one of the first live-action Disney movies I saw and I loved it.  I still love it.  Maybe I'll watch it today while I'm working on my projects.  Hmmm. (Man, I love working from home!)  Every Friday night, my family would get a take-and-bake pizza.  The pizza place was next door to the video store.  While waiting for them to assemble our pizza, we would go next door to rent that evening's movies.   I think I rented every single Hayley Mills movie (multiple times) and most of the other Disney movies as well.  I cannot remember a lot of the other live action Disney films, except for the Hayley Mills ones. And Mary Poppins, of course.  I also vaguely recall Freaky Friday

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