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Oldest Sequel Ever Made


hamradio
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While replying and reading replies on the King Kong thread it got me to thinking about what is the oldest TRUE sequel ever made of a movie.

 

Does anybody know? My question does apply to silents and sound movies.

 

The oldest I can remember from personal memory is "The Bride of Frankenstein"

 

Would "The Son of Kong" be considered a sequel or a seperate movie based on the King Kong character?

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The Son of King Kong is a sequel since it starts out with Carl Denham hiding out in a New York apartment, just a day or so after Kong was killed, and he has the cops and half the city searching for him to arrest him and sue him for all the trouble his monkey caused. He has to get out of town fast, and he ships out with the same captain. He picks up a new girl in some Asian port and he heads back to Skull Island.

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I don't know if its a sequel but I think it is. Don Q son of zorro 1923 is a sequel to mark of zorro 1920. both with douglas fairbanks. also son of the sheik 1926 is a sequel to the sheik 1921 both with rudolph valentino. maybee rudy he lern de art of sequeling frum doug.

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Hello Hamradio, This is a good one. I don't know about the earliest film sequel ever, but how about going as far back as 1914?

 

The Patchwork Girl of OZ (1914)

His Majesty, the Scarecrow of OZ (1914)

The Magic Cloak of OZ (1914)

The Wizard of OZ (1925)

 

The movies just couldn't keep up with Mr. Frank Baum, the writer of the OZ books! He wrote abut 40 OZ books, and is rumored to have had his literary imagination fired up with hash. The above mentioned films are on a single DVD release if you are interested. It is amazing that these things have survived. Very little of the early film production survives, as it either deteriorated or the film was recycled for it's silver content.

 

Thelma

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Your information is great. Wizard of Oz fans will be glad to know this. I never have heard of the first 3 in this list before. You are correct, it is a miracle those films survived at all considered many films made in the 1920's did not!

 

I like the title of the first one The Patchwork Girl of Oz - its sounds like a girl friend for the Scarecrow. LOL.

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Thanks Hamradio. For those interested in seeing these early versions, the 4 films are available from Alpha Video, for about $6, on a DVD entitled "The Wizard of OZ Collection- Silents".

 

I must remind people who are about to see these early versions that you have to put the Judy Garland film out of your mind. By 1939, filmmaking was much more advanced and better funded, and so it is no comparison. It's otherwise hard to enjoy something when you are constantly comparing it to something that came much later, and which was made with far more resources and sophistication. The silent movies do give a "sampler" of some of Baum's highly fevered up imagination, and show plotlines not covered by MGM 25 years later.

 

Thelma

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ThelmaTodd, you seem to have an interest in earlier silent version of sound classics. I have a silent you might be interest in - The Bluebird.

 

It is available from Grapevine Video and the quality is to say is bad. The people of Grapevine rescued it in the nick of time, I mean they could not have waited even 2 months longer.

There is a scene in which the tone of the pipe organ score, which was done by Grapevine changes in mood when an extremely bad 1 min section of nitrate decomposition comes up. I think the music was reflecting on it instead of the movie scene. I could be wrong but the music fits.

 

The movie was made in 1918 Directed by Maurice Tourneur and stars Tula Belle and Robin McDougall.

 

FORGET the Shirley Temple version made in 1940. This movie has charactors galore and deals with "seeing into the soul of things". You might find it really corney even by 1940's standards.

 

One funny character is the sick girls mother, her outfit is something else. The only thing she lacks is a broom and wand.

 

The DVD also contains a Charlie Chaplin movie "Behind the Scenes" made in 1916.

 

They also sell other extremely rare Silents forgot about entirely. No wonder we are losing them left and right. At lease some people care.

 

A have 2 silent versions of the Wizard of Oz, I recorded them from TCM.

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Wow hamradio, wow! I went to the Grapevine Video website at www.grapevinevideo.com and was very pleasantly surprised by what they offer. ALL TCM fans should know about this vendor, and I recommend that all of us go there and check it out. This is an outfit I did not know about. These message boards are a useful way for us old film fans to share information with one another.

 

This one was a real three point shot!

 

Thelma

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