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Technicolor Footage to The Big Parade/Wings?


gagman66
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Does anyone have information concerning the 2-Strip Technicolor footage of both THE BIG PARADE (1925) and WINGS (1927)?

 

Regardless of what TCM has or hasn't shown, both films were fairly recently restored. THE BIG PARADE from the previously believed Lost Original Camera Negative in 2004 by Eastman House with funding from Warner's. But does the Two-Strip Technicolor footage still survive?

 

I understand that Tints were re-instated to the new masters of both films, but I have no real information as far as the Technicolor footage is concerned? Can anyone help out with this?

 

Some of the Technicolor footage to Von Stroheim's THE WEDDING MARCH does remain, and is even in the version of the film that I have. WINGS, I am not sure about though?

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Jeff.... why would tints be hard to recreate? It seems like a fairly simple editing process, especially with notes of where the tinted scenes were..... I just watched a Eastman House restored HELL'S ANGELS the other night which had the tints and 2-strip technicolor scenes.

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Ed,

 

With THE BIG PARADE it appears the first couple release versions in 1925, and 1927, were both Multi-tinted throughout, except for the Technicolor footage? Anyway, the Tint's have been restored. Even if this version has only been shown at a handful of live screenings over the past few years to date.

 

Now I don't know why, but there have been people on this site, and others, who have argued with me in the past that THE BIG PARADE never had any Two-Strip Technicolor sequences? Well, according to Silent Era. Com, It did! And I knew that I was right about this all along!

 

As for WINGS? Just check the info that is given on the TCM Movie-Data Base under "Alternate Versions", and it is easy to confirm that movie once had Technicolor footage as well!

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With that useless computer colorization technology the closing scenes of THE MERRY WIDOW could be easily converted to color, as the scene was originally photographed in Technicolor.

 

The same could be used for other scenes that survive in black and white. Two strip Technicolor was never an accomplishment as Three strip was and that technology could have a good use after all.

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Jorge,

 

That would be cool! The list of Silent films that originally contained Technicolor footage is long, and quite surprising.

 

I personally think that the All-Technicolor feature THE VIKING (1928), looks very impressive! It isn't as far off from the later Technicolor as many would have you believe. I mean, no one's skin-tone looks like Lily Munster! Oh, for the lost "Dream Sequence" in THE GARDEN OF EDEN!

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I also love two-strip Technicolor!! I?m really looking forward to *Toll of the Sea* in June, another two-stripper to add to my collection :). I wish Clara Bow?s film *Red Hair* was still around b/c the beginning sequence was filmed in two-strip so everyone could see that fiery red hair.

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guys, all I meant was that adding a TINT should be easy for Eastman House or UCLA, etc. if they simply want to approximate an original TINT.... it might not be the original neagative or whatever but at least it would be faithful to the original released version for THE BIG PARADE or WINGS.....

 

2-strip Technicolor is another matter and apparently cannot to added if the original color film is missing which is why so many silent films are shown without color sequences.

 

HELL'S ANGELS had both tinted scenes and 2-strip Technicolor (in which Jean Harlow was gorgeous--much less brassy than her later MGM image). This is really an odd film since many scenes look like they were filmed as silent sequences and then had dialog (badly) added in.... I never thought this was a goat gland film! But the restored color and tinted sequences are just beautiful.

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Time Warner could "restore" THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (1929) back to its two color Technicolor glory, by colorizing it, since no known color print exists any more. they could also do this to a few of the Warner Bros. early 1930's talkies that were once in color and only survive in black and white prints.

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