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Sure..Charleton Heston


darvo2
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Sure Heston deserves a day to view his films. However, when Bob Hope the greatest entertainer that ever lived died he did not get a day, He deserves an entire weekend for all that man did during his lifetime. I remember when he died I looked at TCM and AMC and there wasn't even a sniff at a bob hope movie. Nothing. That just still rubs me raw.

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Bob Hope passed away late on a Sunday night - July 27th, 2003. The TCM obituary can be found here -

http://www.tcm.com/movienews/index/?cid=33227

 

If a tribute was absent from the TCM schedule that July, it likely was the result of time constraints due to his passing during the last week of that month. Beginning August 1^st^, TCM was commited to their annual "Summer Under The Stars" schedule devoting 24-hours to a single star. There is no flexibility to the August schedule in which to incorporate a "mini-festival" tribute to a recently deceased Hollywood legend - even one of the stature of Bob Hope.

 

Though not timely as a "tribute", TCM did include Bob Hope in the line-up of the 2004 "Summer Under The Stars" event the following year.

http://www.tcm.com/thismonth/article?cid=79895

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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An obituary is one thing but come on. I believe there are a very precious few actors and actresses whose body of work on and off the screen are so far over the top of everyone else's that they should have a day designated every year on classic movie channels to honor them. Bob Hope stands tall at the very top of that list.

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It's easily explained. The vast majority of Bob Hope's films were made for Paramount. They are not in the TCM Library. TCM does not have ready access to Paramount titles.

 

In fact, they do, by virtue of contracts with Universal (who own the pre-1948 Paramount library), and Paramount. As I've said elsewhere, the TCM programmers are very slow to exploit these packages, instead larding the bulk of their schedules with the same, tired MGM and Warners fare month, after month, after month.

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Thank you for your post. I only hope somebody at TCM reads it.

There have been many explanations as to why TCM rarely shows 20th Century Fox movies, etc., but I still don't get it. If AMC (before it went to the dogs) could show Fox and Paramount why not TCM???

Tonight on my local PBS station they're running East of Eden. Also in the past month or so they've run (and I gratefully recorded) The Ghost and Mrs. Muir and Mr. Roberts (also The Nun's Story, don't know if that was Fox). If PBS why not TCM?

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Okay Poinciana, where in the HECK do you live? I may move there. I wish my PBS station did things like this. I remember when PBS gave me a lot of information on old movies, but it's been decades.

Kyle's explanation sounds the most likely. Not knowing what is or is not available to TCM for broadcast, I look to others in that regard. I'm still wondering why they didn't choose to re-air "Madigan" during the recent Richard Widmark tribute, having recently found out it had been shown on TCM before. Broadcast rights must fluctuate, but have no idea who has specific rights at a given time. CS has pointed out before that TCM has an immense treasure trove they're choosing not to share. Hope he's right there, because it's information that I rely upon.

darvo, I have immense respect for Bob Hope, his work and his life, and would be good to see more of him on TCM, even though the initial (probably unintentional) slight can never be corrected.

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We live in Carlsbad, CA where we get San Diego PBS station KPBS. The "price" we have to pay for this particular PBS is nonstop pledge programs at least 12 or 15 times a year. In March of this year we had three weeks of pledge shows, mostly Suze Whatshername (or as I call her, "Jaws") interspersed with Wayne Whatshisname and all those waltz shows and blah blah with pledge breaks every ten minutes.

Whatever, I am indeed grateful that KPBS shows these great movies.

 

 

I AGREE abt Bob Hope. He was great in the movies, an underrated actor who made it look easy, as all good actors do. Nothing against Chuck H, but how indeed could TCM kind of whiz on by Bob only to worship Heston. A puzzlement.

Aside: Much has been made of CH's bass voice, well, we saw him in a play LA's Ahmanson Theater. It was some Sherlock Holmes thing. It co-starred Jeremy Brett as Watson. The fact was Brett could be heard in the rafters but we could barely hear CH. And the play was miked.

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Two things to keep in mind. First, Universal and Fox control which of their films TCM can lease. It's not the other way around. I've given up on trying guess the reasons that both those studios do what they do in regards to releasing classics.I do know that in the case of Fox, they save some of them just for their own Fox Movie Channel.

 

Secondly, there are more classics from those studios showing up on the premium channels, like HBO/Cinemax and Encore. That means the if TCM wants them they have to bid for them and the winner is always the one with the heaviest purse.

 

Regarding the films on PBS, it's my understanding that this was a special non-exclusive deal PBS made for a small package of films. TCM has also been running some of them recently, like TWELVE ANGRY MEN and THE APARTMENT. The films are available to any PBS station to run. It's up the management of the local stations to run them or not. Here in upstate NY, the station in Syracuse runs them twice a week, saturday night and an encore on sunday afternoon.

 

Incidently, last year that station eliminated all pledge breaks in all programs. Since they did that donations have soared. People should be asking the other PBS stations why they can't do it too.

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Aside: Much has been made of CH's bass voice, well, we saw him in a play LA's Ahmanson Theater. It was some Sherlock Holmes thing. It co-starred Jeremy Brett as Watson. The fact was Brett could be heard in the rafters but we could barely hear CH. And the play was miked.

 

The play is called The Crucifer of Blood, by Paul Giovanni, which ran for 236 performances and 16 previews on Broadway between 9/14/1978 and 4/22/1979.

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Oh, thank you. Not being able to remember the name of the play was bothering me, and how wonderful to know that it had such a long run in NY. For me, it's little addenda like this that adds so much to the enjoyment of this site.

Actually, what I should have made clear was that the *technical staff* in the LA production "should" have insured that that wonderful CH "basso profundo" could be heard even in the back of the house. Perhaps what we had that night was a preview of the sorry state that the sound-mixing profession has degenerated into over the last couple of decades. But then, that's another whole thread/topic.....

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I don't mean to burst your bubble........

 

But IMHO Bob Hope was no where near the actor that Charlton Heston was.

 

Now don't get me wrong.

 

I think Bob Hope was probably the greatest entertainer of the 20th century. His comedy was great. It was wonderful how he went all over the world to entertain our troops (most in Hollywood today should take a lesson about his committment to our troops). And most of his movies were quite entertaining. Especially the road pictures with Crosby.

 

But lets get one thing straight. He was no Heston.

 

When I think of historical, or grand epics made during the 50's through the 70's, Heston is the person I think of.

 

The circus manager in The Greatest Show on Earth.

President Andrew Jackson in The President's Lady.

Buffalo Bill Cody in Pony Express.

William Clark in The Far Horizons.

Moses in The Ten Commandments.

Touch of Evil

The Big Country

The Wreck of the Mary Deare

Ben-Hur

El Cid

55 Days at Peking

John the Baptist in The Greatest Story Ever Told

Major Dundee.

Michelangelo in The Agony and the Ecstasy.

General Charles 'Chinese' Gordon in Khartoum.

Planet of the Apes.

Will Penny.

Mark Antony in Julius Caesar.

The Hawaiians.

The Omega Man.

Soylent Green.

Cardinal Richelieu in The Three Musketeers.

Airport 1975.

Earthquake.

The Player King in Hamlet.

 

With his son Fraser, he produced and also starred in several TV movies, including remakes of Treasure Island and A Man For All Seasons.

 

In 1965, Heston became president of the Screen Actors Guild. He remained in the position until 1971, the second longest tenure to date in that office.

 

Heston was a great actor and deserved IMHO a much larger tribute. A twenty four hour or possibly an entire daylight schedule of films.

 

Bob Hope was a comedian extroadinare. And he probably deserved a long tribute. But as it has been said here, his movies probably weren't available for a variety of reasons.

 

And I doubt very seriously that the United States Navy will name a ship in honor of Charlton Heston. And in all honesty, I think having a Naval vessel named in his honor is more important and a far-lasting tribute to Bob Hope's service to our troops overseas, than a tribute on TCM.

 

According to US Navy information:

The ship is the lead vessel in a new class of sea lift ships named for the entertainer Bob Hope, in honor of his more than 50 years of support to U.S. forces stationed around the world. The USS Bob Hope is known as a Large, Medium-Speed, Roll-on/Roll-off ship. Entering service in early 1998, these ships measure approximately 950- feet in length, almost the size of one of the Navy's Nimitz-class aircraft carriers, and travel at speeds up to 24 knots. They are classified as non-combatant vessels, crewed by civilian mariners under the Navy's Military Sealift Command and used to preposition tanks, trucks and other wheeled vehicles and supplies needed to support an Army heavy brigade.

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*"An obituary is one thing but come on."* - darvo2

 

I didn't mean to imply that TCM's posting of an obituary was "enough" of a memorial for the passing of Bob Hope. Primarily, I was only linking to that article to help explain the how the timing of his death worked against TCM being able to plan an appropriate film memorial for Bob Hope.

 

Hope's passing so near the beginning of the "Summer Under The Stars" event left just three days to try to assemble a film tribute. As others have pointed out, I don't think TCM had the television rights to the many of his films in 2003. I think it was 2004 when TCM began playing all the "Road" pictures and the other comedies he made at Paramount.

 

From what I have read, when TCM approaches other studios (studios outside of the Time/Warner family) for access to their film libraries and negotiates for films to show on TCM., the agreements are (typically) for specific films and only for a certain length of time. TCM doesn't get access to any or every film at a particular studio. So, while TCM was playing many Paramount films in 2003 it couldn't quickly plan to show a slate of Bob Hope films on a day's notice AND get it on the schedule before the end of July if it didn't have a lease agreement already in place.

 

It would be great if TCM had a "Netflix"-like agrement with every studio in Hollywood allowing them to order up any film in the studios' libraries at anytime and then "keep" it for as long as they like. But, unforunately, it doesn't work that way. It took 14 years of "begging" (if Robert Osborne is to be believed) before 20^th^ Century Fox would _allow_ TCM to present *All About Eve* on its channel. And it is such a short-term lease that *All About Eve* won't be available for a reprise showing later this year as part of the Essentials series.

 

Yet, I am beginning to believe that there are fewer and fewer films which TCM can't have access to if it wants - if it plans for far enough in advance - and as long as the studios are willing to lease the films to TCM . I know not to expect to see *The Ten Commandments* or *It's A Wonderful Life* on TCM in my lifetime. But any other good or great movie? Sure! Sooner or later it will be on TCM.

 

Heck. There have been so many "new" acquisitions on TCM lately, I am starting to believe that the channel could even get their hands on *Porgy And Bess* or Fredric March's *Death Of A Salesman* if it wanted to. That's what happens when I get to see *Wings*, *All About Eve* and *How Green Was My Valley* on TCM all within a few months of each other.

 

I think the programming dept. at TCM is full of "Annie Sullivans" working miracles every month.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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First off...Charlton Heston, man..RIP. He rocked and now he's gone and that is very, very sad.

 

Secondly, I have a suggestion for how TCM can make up any perceived slight to the greatest entertainer to grace the silver screen, Bob Hope. I know TCM has a deal now for post '50 Paramounts. If they can score the long-coveted deal for the Universals and Paramounts prior to that, I would suggest, humbly, a tribute like the one they are doing for Frankie "Ol' Blue Eyes" Sinatra next month. Seriously. It would rock.

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And I doubt very seriously that the United States Navy will name a ship in honor of Charlton Heston.

 

I think you're right about that, if only because, in GRAY LADY DOWN, the only film in which Heston played a U.S. Naval officer, his bad decision sends his nuclear submarine to the bottom of the ocean and nearly kills everyone on board.

 

A pretty bad precedent would be set.

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Your not bursting anyones bubble. Heston is ofcourse a great actor, Hope was not but he was funny and I always laughed at his movies. Heston in the larger scope of things did nothing outside of acting to add to humanity when compared to Hope. Heston ofcourse did do a lot of humanitarian things but not to the degree that bob hope did. I am only saying that Bob Hope deserves a permanent day every year dedicated to his films, as a small way to continually honor him for all that he did for all of us. I would prefer an entire weekend every year, but a day will do.

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Dear Mark,

 

Thanks so much for all the useful info! I'll make a copy of what you wrote abt PBS and send it to those coercers at our PBS station.

 

PS Maybe those studios would make even more $ if they leased the classics to every station who wanted them....

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> {quote:title=markfp2 wrote:}{quote}

> Two things to keep in mind. First, Universal and Fox control which of their films TCM can lease. It's not the other way around. I've given up on trying guess the reasons that both those studios do what they do in regards to releasing classics.I do know that in the case of Fox, they save some of them just for their own Fox Movie Channel.

>

I'm glad somebody else gets it!

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