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Finally! I Have Seen All Of Cary Grant's Films


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41 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Hitch wanted Gary for Foreign Correspondent too, didn't he?

Not sure. I know he wanted Barbara Stanwyck for Priscilla Lane's role in SABOTEUR.

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11 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

All 72 of them. He is my favorite actor. Due to purchasing Cary Grant The Vault Collection DVD and checking on youtube, I have now seen every film he has done.

 

I applaud you sir. I am a completist when it comes to music but, not films (yet). I have seen every episode of some TV Series but, films require some digging around. Good Job !

Gives me some ideas...

 

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I checked my list and was surprised I've only seen 26 of Grant's films, even though he's among my top 10 or 12 favorite actors.

My favorites are Charade, His Girl Friday, Bringing Up Baby, The Philadelphia Story, and North By Northwest, probably in that order.  I can't say enough about Charade, which ironically was the last one on my list that I got a chance to see.  I don't recall seeing it on TCM's schedule until a few years ago, but now it seems to show up many times a year.  What a perfect combination of stars, character actors, plot twists, humor, and one of the more believable May-December romantic pairings that Hollywood's ever attempted.  What a relief to see Audrey with Grant, after being so ludicrously paired with the likes of Bogart and Cooper, both of whom had one foot in the grave and seemed qualified to be her grandfather.  Astaire wasn't much more convincing, but at least he exuded a bit more energy in Funny Face than a dead battery.  What was it about Hepburn that led filmmakers to keep pairing her with men twice her age?

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5 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I like Suspicion but mostly the first half of the film.   I'm a sucker for romance and the interplay between Grant and Fontaine while falling in love touches me.   But once it moves into the suspense part of the story (is he or is he not) the film falls somewhat flat when compared to other Grant films because it was clear to me from the start that Grant wasn't going to be an actual bad boy.     (even if the ending wasn't compromised).

 

And I've always thought that IF Hitch had NOT "copped-out" with his "Hollywood-ized" ending to this film, that THIS might've been considered one of Grant's very best performances ever, as I would have loved to have seen how Cary would've played a killer.

Ya see James, I've always thought the "suspense part"(the second half of it) was where this film truly grabbed my attention.

(...I mean, suave, smooth and even "devil-may-care" you see Cary playing almost ALL the time, but a killer, THEN you would've seen him "stretch" as an actor, perhaps)

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I absolutely adore Cary Grant in all of his teamings with Katharine Hepburn (especially BRINGING UP BABY, that movie never fails to crack me up).

I know he wasn't overly fond of his performance in ARSENIC AND OLD LACE, felt it was over-the-top, and there are some posters on here who agree with his assessment but I think that's what the role and the story called for, and what makes it a great part....I thought he was hilariously and enjoyably over-the-top.

And I just love MR. BLANDINGS BUILDS HIS DREAM HOUSE, he was naturally and comically frustrated as the adman/family man who just wants to build and move into the ideal home and nearly loses his sanity in the progress! The beauty of this film is it didn't have to rely on cheap slapstick schticks to make it funny (unlike the similar 1986 Tom Hanks/Shelley Long flick, THE MONEY PIT, which had falling bathtubs through the floor and flying cooked turkeys crashing through the window).

SUSPICION had the potential to be a great film, but falls flat due to the cop-out ending of the movie. Still Cary made the most of what he had to work with, as did Joan Fontaine.

Whether it was truly a classic, or only a so-so film, there's no denying though that Cary had that charisma that kept you watching.

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22 hours ago, ChristineHoard said:

Cary is so over-the-top in ARSENIC AND OLD LACE.  The movie is fun but I find him almost a distraction.

It true, but he is hilariously over the top. He is an actor who I find very entertaining when he does that, very few actors can. (Jack Nicholson is another). When Tom Cruise overacts it makes you cringe, but when Cary Grant overplays it makes you laugh.

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18 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

It true, but he is hilariously over the top. He is an actor who I find very entertaining when he does that, very few actors can. (Jack Nicholson is another). When Tom Cruise overacts it makes you cringe, but when Cary Grant overplays it makes you laugh.

I think what makes “Arsenic and Old Lace” so enjoyable for me is Cary Grant’s over-the-top performance. His performance is such a juxtaposition from the typical “Cary Grant” persona and that’s what makes it so funny. At the beginning of the film, when Grant and Priscilla Lane marry, his usual demeanor is intact. However, after he starts discovering bodies and piecing together things his aunts have said and what they’re doing, plus add Teddy Roosevelt and “Boris Karloff’s” antics, and you have a suave, sophisticated man being driven bonkers.  For me, that’s what makes it so funny. 

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16 hours ago, Dargo said:

And I've always thought that IF Hitch had NOT "copped-out" with his "Hollywood-ized" ending to this film, that THIS might've been considered one of Grant's very best performances ever, as I would have loved to have seen how Cary would've played a killer.

Ya see James, I've always thought the "suspense part"(the second half of it) was where this film truly grabbed my attention.

(...I mean, suave, smooth and even "devil-may-care" you see Cary playing almost ALL the time, but a killer, THEN you would've seen him "stretch" as an actor, perhaps)

I should have been more clear;   the film's "suspense parts"  lose juice on subsequent viewings since all that suspense is really just a misdirection and the viewer now knows this.    (but the early romantic parts 'hold up' on subsequent viewings). 

I can't recall how much the film grabbed me the first time I saw it over 25 years ago and if I believed that Grant could have been a killer,  especially of his friend, just for financial gain.   (and of course his wife to cover the crime).

(but I know my wife, who saw the film only 10 years ago,  didn't 'buy it' since Cary has her so much under his thumb he could get away with murder!).

 

 

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I just checked the # of films I've seen of Cary Grant--and I have seen 73 films.  I counted Without Reservations in which he had an Uncredited part.  I'm an avid collector and have spent a lot of time, energy, and money tracking down his films.  The great thing is that they're all out there.  He has been in so many of my favorite films. 

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What a great project!  Cary Grant has long been my favorite actor -- as I've mentioned here before, I had tickets to see him in person on the night he died -- so I admire your having seen all of his movies.  Since it obviously wasn't easy to find each one, that's a real accomplishment!

It's hard to pick my favorites because I love so many of his movies just because he's in them.  It was seeing one of his films, Holiday, that made me realize that older movies had something special about them, a feeling that's only grown stronger in the 40 years since I saw that film on the late show.  And while I can readily acknowledge that some of his movies are greater than others (for example, Bringing Up BabyOnly Angels Have Wings, The Philadelphia Story, Notorious), I get tremendous enjoyment out of some of the lesser ones (e.g., Every Girl Should Be Married, People Will Talk, Houseboat, Operation Petticoat, The Grass Is Greener, That Touch of Mink, Father Goose).

But if forced to, here's a list of favorites, in roughly chronological order:

  • The Awful Truth (no one can get a laugh out of "Tulsa" like Cary)
  • Holiday (Cary and Kate were always great together)
  • Bringing Up Baby (ditto!!)
  • Only Angels Have Wings (one of the films that proves Grant was a fine dramatic actor)
  • The Philadelphia Story ("masterpiece" was the result of adding Stewart, Hussey, and Weidler to the already unbeatable Grant/Hepburn team)
  • The Talk of the Town (great job of combining comic lightness and social drama)
  • Arsenic and Old Lace (although Cary reportedly didn't like his own performance here, there's no shame in acting like a nut if you're funny while doing it)
  • Notorious (yes, it's a Hitchcock thriller, but it's also a great drama, with more proof that Cary was every bit as good as tremendous dramatic actors like Bergman and Rains)
  • The Bishop's Wife (Cary shows that he can convey a gentle spirituality, not exactly the easiest goal for an actor)
  • Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (Cary and Myrna as the kind of middle class neighbors everyone would like to have)
  • To Catch A Thief (just a lot of fun all around)
  • Indiscreet (Grant and Bergman show that romance doesn't end just because you've reached 40 or 50)
  • North By Northwest (maybe it's "overrated" because it's hard to stop saying great things about it, with Grant bringing humor, romance, and thrills to Hitchcock's tight structure)
  • Charade (too bad the James Bond series didn't get Grant -- he shows how it should be done, with some humor thrown in)

I have to admit, with some shame, that I've never watched Gunga Din, although it sits waiting on my shelf.  My wife and I were just talking about it the other day, so maybe we'll watch it soon.

And I'm not sure why I left out His Girl Friday or My Favorite Wife, both of which I enjoy every time I see them.  I guess they somehow don't quite make it into "magical" territory for me.  Same with Suspicion and None But the Lonely Heart -- Cary and everyone else are great in those movies, and I enjoy them even though they're not "favorites" -- like a lot of other movies in his filmography.

I sometimes wonder if I'd be a film buff today if it weren't for Cary Grant.

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On 5/6/2018 at 8:41 PM, AndyM108 said:

I checked my list and was surprised I've only seen 26 of Grant's films, even though he's among my top 10 or 12 favorite actors.

My favorites are Charade, His Girl Friday, Bringing Up Baby, The Philadelphia Story, and North By Northwest, probably in that order.  I can't say enough about Charade, which ironically was the last one on my list that I got a chance to see.  I don't recall seeing it on TCM's schedule until a few years ago, but now it seems to show up many times a year.  What a perfect combination of stars, character actors, plot twists, humor, and one of the more believable May-December romantic pairings that Hollywood's ever attempted.  What a relief to see Audrey with Grant, after being so ludicrously paired with the likes of Bogart and Cooper, both of whom had one foot in the grave and seemed qualified to be her grandfather.  Astaire wasn't much more convincing, but at least he exuded a bit more energy in Funny Face than a dead battery.  What was it about Hepburn that led filmmakers to keep pairing her with men twice her age?

While I've seen more than you, I too was stunned after carefully going over Grant's resume to learn how few of his films I've actually seen. I counted 41 of his films I have seen, about 56 per cent of his total output. By far the biggest blank spot in my slate is his '30s work at Paramount, where his output was very prodigious. I've only seen three of the 20-some-odd films he made at Paramount between 1932 and 1936. But I've also missed out on several biggies that would fall within the realm of the "TCM Library": Sylvia ScarlettSuzyMr. Blandings Builds His Dream HouseCrisis and Dream Wife are all on my haven't-seen list. I also haven't seen either of his collaborations with Ginger Rogers (I'm not sure I even knew they had worked together). Oh, I've also never seen his final picture, Walk, Don't Run. Does TCM ever show that? I see it was a Columbia release. 

One of the odder entries I have happened to see, only because it's on YouTube, is The Amazing Adventure from Grand National Pictures in 1936, which I believe is the short-lived studio where Cagney made a couple of pictures while more or less on strike at Warner Bros. I don't know how Cary ended up making a movie there, but it was right about the time his contract with Paramount ended.

Charade, I believe, somehow fell into the PD, so even though it was originally a Universal release, TCM can show it any time they want. 

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On 5/6/2018 at 11:52 AM, Sepiatone said:

FATHER GOOSE

This is one of my favorite as well. It's one of the few times we see him disheveled, unshaven and cranky. He is still charming and funny and I like the song Pass Me By in the opening credits. 

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On 5/6/2018 at 8:43 AM, Det Jim McLeod said:

All 72 of them. He is my favorite actor. Due to purchasing Cary Grant The Vault Collection DVD and checking on youtube, I have now seen every film he has done.

These are the ones that were on the DVD that I hadn't seen before

.....

Has anyone else seen all of Grant's films? What are your favorites?

 

As others have said a great project and accomplishment!
Being a long time CG fan, I too am surprised by the number of his films that I have NOT yet seen. But he falls right in there with some of my other fav's along those lines. (I guess I just have too many favorites).
Likewise hard for me to single out a single one of his "best" movies that tops another of his "best" movies.
Suffice it to say that practically every title posted about in this thread that someone else liked, I liked as well... and practically every title that someone said they didn't like, I still liked! :)
And those were only the ones that I have seen.
I won't bore anyone here by listing what I have and haven't yet seen, but it's more than some and less than others, and far short of the OP's 100%. Although if I were to grade myself on a bell curve, I think I'd give myself a passing grade at this point. But I certainly require a lot of homework to catch up to you Jim.

Thank you for a most enjoyable topic and thread!

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1 hour ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

This is one of my favorite as well. It's one of the few times we see him disheveled, unshaven and cranky. He is still charming and funny and I like the song Pass Me By in the opening credits. 

That was the song performed by the orchestra at the 42nd Academy Awards in 1970 when Grant was presented an honorary Oscar. The award was presented by his "The Pride and the Passion" co-star, Frank Sinatra.

 

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17 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

While I've seen more than you, I too was stunned after carefully going over Grant's resume to learn how few of his films I've actually seen. I counted 41 of his films I have seen, about 56 per cent of his total output. By far the biggest blank spot in my slate is his '30s work at Paramount, where his output was very prodigious. I've only seen three of the 20-some-odd films he made at Paramount between 1932 and 1936. But I've also missed out on several biggies that would fall within the realm of the "TCM Library": Sylvia ScarlettSuzyMr. Blandings Builds His Dream HouseCrisis and Dream Wife are all on my haven't-seen list. I also haven't seen either of his collaborations with Ginger Rogers (I'm not sure I even knew they had worked together). Oh, I've also never seen his final picture, Walk, Don't Run. Does TCM ever show that? I see it was a Columbia release. 

One of the odder entries I have happened to see, only because it's on YouTube, is The Amazing Adventure from Grand National Pictures in 1936, which I believe is the short-lived studio where Cagney made a couple of pictures while more or less on strike at Warner Bros. I don't know how Cary ended up making a movie there, but it was right about the time his contract with Paramount ended.

Charade, I believe, somehow fell into the PD, so even though it was originally a Universal release, TCM can show it any time they want. 

Dream Wife was interesting.  While I didn't dislike it, it isn't among my favorite Cary Grant films.  I'm not sure if Grant had been sick when this film was made, or what was going on, but he is very thin in this film.  Not that Grant was ever heavy, but he is very thin in this film.  It's kind of disconcerting. 

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House is a great film.  The kids are annoying, but Grant, Myrna Loy, Melvyn Douglas and Louise Beavers are excellent.  Beavers has one of the best lines in the film: "If you a'int eatin' Wham, you a'int eatin' ham!" 

I really disliked Sylvia Scarlett.  I didn't like either Katharine Hepburn or Grant's characters.

I think I've seen Suzy multiple times but I can't remember anything about it?

I liked Once Upon a Honeymoon starring Grant and Ginger Rogers, even though it was a very strange film.  Grant and Rogers also co-starred in Monkey Business.  I've only seen that film once, but it's interesting in that it's an early Marilyn Monroe appearance.  

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14 hours ago, Stephan55 said:

As others have said a great project and accomplishment!
Being a long time CG fan, I too am surprised by the number his films that I have NOT yet seen. But he falls right in there with some of my other fav's along those lines. (I guess I just have too many favorites).
Likewise hard for me to single out a single one of his "best" movies that tops another of his "best" movies.
Suffice it to say that practically every title posted about in this thread that someone else liked, I liked as well... and practically every title that someone said they didn't like, I still liked! :)
And those were only the ones that I have seen.
I won't bore anyone here by listing what I have and haven't yet seen, but it's more than some and less than others, and far short of the OP's 100%. Although if I were to grade myself on a bell curve, I think I'd give myself a passing grade at this point. But I certainly require a lot of homework to catch up to you Jim.

Thank you for a most enjoyable topic and thread!

Fellow South Bay L.A. boy and classic movie/Cary Grant fan, Stephan...and speaking of our first exposure to Cary...

You might remember back in the late-'60s that the RKO-owned(at the time) L.A. station KHJ-TV Channel-9 would occasionally run during the 11pm time slot, an entire week of a series of old RKO produced films from the 1940s. I'm NOT talking about "The Million Dollar Movie" series which aired earlier in the evening and which showed the same movie all week during the 8pm time slot, here. I'm talking about a later evening series of different older films which KHJ showed, and most often showcasing a series of films either with a common theme or starring the same film actor or actress. 

One week and during the time my school(Gardena High in my case) was in summer recess, and thus the reason I was allowed by my parents to stay up past 11pm, Channel-9 showed a series of Cary Grant films during this time slot, and by Wednesday night of that week and after they showed My Favorite Wife, I would forever thereafter be a dyed-in-the-wool Cary Grant fan and admirer.

I remember being surprised at how well such a debonair man could be so damn funny, what with his perfect comic timing. Such a thing seemed almost shockingly but delightfully "incongruous" to this teenager at the time.

I also remember telling my mother the next day at the breakfast table of my little "epiphany", and even acted out the following elevator scene for her...

elevator1_cary.gif 

(...this scene still cracks me up every time I see it...fifty years later)

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One thing I've found with Cary Grant, is that I don't think he is particularly that good in costume pictures.  Some actors, like Errol Flynn, for example, are fantastic in costume films.  Cary Grant's persona however is so modern, so contemporary, that he just seems awkward and miscast.  Whereas some actors, like Flynn again, for example, seem at ease in a costume picture and contemporary films.  I'm not exactly sure why that is, but some actors' personalities are very modern and very "now." Bogart is another one who I couldn't picture in a costume picture.  He is horribly miscast in Virginia City, a western. I think Cary Grant would be ridiculous in a western. 

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3 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

One thing I've found with Cary Grant, is that I don't think he is particularly that good in costume pictures.  Some actors, like Errol Flynn, for example, are fantastic in costume films.  Cary Grant's persona however is so modern, so contemporary, that he just seems awkward and miscast.  Whereas some actors, like Flynn again, for example, seem at ease in a costume picture and contemporary films.  I'm not exactly sure why that is, but some actors' personalities are very modern and very "now." Bogart is another one who I couldn't picture in a costume picture.  He is horribly miscast in Virginia City, a western. I think Cary Grant would be ridiculous in a western. 

It seems to me that Grant, a tremendously versatile actor, would have been just fine in a Western. Isn't that what "Gunga Din" is, anyway? Remember, Sinatra and Company remade it in 1962 as "Sergeants 3."

 

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3 hours ago, jakeem said:

It seems to me that Grant, a tremendously versatile actor, would have been just fine in a Western. Isn't that what "Gunga Din" is, anyway? Remember, Sinatra and Company remade it in 1962 as "Sergeants 3."
.....

I agree that CG did a few pretty terrific period costumers such as "Ginga Din" and "The Pride and the Passion," ...
Although "GD" was made into a western in
"Sergeants 3," I can't recall ever seeing CG in any actual western, can you? :unsure:
And like Speedy, I have a difficult time imagining Grant in tights, though I can easily picture him in a "dressing gown" in some screwball comedy :D
He may have been able to handle a dramatic swashbuckler role like "Captain Blood," with aplomb, but I just can't see him playing "Robin Hood." (at least not without laughing)
Granted (pun intended), I have been conditioned by the roles that I have (and have not) seen him in, and that may make all the difference. ;):)

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10 hours ago, Dargo said:

Fellow South Bay L.A. boy and classic movie/Cary Grant fan, Stephan...and speaking of our first exposure to Cary...

You might remember back in the late-'60s that ...

Ha ha, agree and loved that. :D
But while reading your post you triggered a memory (as you often do) from back in the day, in the late 50's-60's when there was that Movies Till Dawn, program.
I can't remember the station, but the show would play the older "classic" movies and have a commercial at the beginning and another at the end, but only one interrupting commercial in the middle of the movie.
The host hawked used cars for somebody (a fat balding guy who's name I can't recall right now... though I do remember seeing a very funny and profane clip of his final hosting gig for that particular dude).
The host had a dog, a beautiful German Shepherd, named Storm, and while walking around these used cars Storm would jump up and sit or lay down on the hood. I think this guy's name was "Chic" something?
He seemed like such an affable, fast talking guy, that I always looked forward to seeing him, his dog, and those great old movies (many of which were new to me at the time).
I watched that show on weekends and during Summer vacation for a number of years. I remember when Storm finally got too old to jump up on the cars anymore...  :(
Eventually "Chic"??? started bringing a Shepherd pup to work that he called "Storm the Second," and I watched as he tried to teach this rambunctious pup to jump up on the cars like his namesake.
I watched Storm II grow into a mature and obediant dog that was the spitting image of Storm I.
I was wondering if you remembered that guy, his dog, and the show, that likely had the greatest single influence of conditioning me to love those old movies. :)

I would like to include a clip or picture of him and his dog, doing one of those commercials, but I can't remember his name so my searches are coming up flat.
But I feel certain that you know what I am talking about (at least I hope so).

BTW, when I had a German Shepherd of my own, I taught her to jump up and sit and lay on the hood of my car too! Really loved that dog.



Haha, I finally found a couple of those commercials...  :D
The host's name was Chick Lambert, and in S. Calif. he worked for Ralph Williams Ford.
He was a precurser to Cal Worthington

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, Dargo said:

Fellow South Bay L.A. boy and classic movie/Cary Grant fan, Stephan...and speaking of our first exposure to Cary...

You might remember back in the late-'60s that the RKO-owned(at the time) L.A. station KHJ-TV Channel-9 would occasionally run during the 11pm time slot, an entire week of a series of old RKO produced films from the 1940s. I'm NOT talking about "The Million Dollar Movie" series which aired earlier in the evening and which showed the same movie all week during the 8pm time slot, here. I'm talking about a later evening series of different older films which KHJ showed, and most often showcasing a series of films either with a common theme or starring the same film actor or actress. 

One week and during the time my school(Gardena High in my case) was in summer recess, and thus the reason I was allowed by my parents to stay up past 11pm, Channel-9 showed a series of Cary Grant films during this time slot, and by Wednesday night of that week and after they showed My Favorite Wife, I would forever thereafter be a dyed-in-the-wool Cary Grant fan and admirer.

I remember being surprised at how well such a debonair man could be so damn funny, what with his perfect comic timing. Such a thing seemed almost shockingly but delightfully "incongruous" to this teenager at the time.

 

I actually do think(when taking the time to wrack my slippery memory) that MY "first exposure" to Cary WAS when NBC's "Saturday Night At The Movies" showed MONKEY BUSINESS one night( I would have been 9).

At least, as best as I can remember....  ;)  And it too, is still one of my favorites.  And not just as a CARY movie, but as a movie.

Sepiatone

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7 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

One thing I've found with Cary Grant, is that I don't think he is particularly that good in costume pictures

"The Howards Of Virginia" is a Grant film that takes place in Revolutionary War times. I saw it in a revival theater many years ago and I recall enjoying it. One scene that sticks out for me is after Grant marries a prim and proper lady (played by Martha Scott), he takes her back to his Virginia home town and introduces her to his raucous friends. She is shocked when they have a wild party one night. 

The film was a flop and Grant decided to stay away from costume pictures after this.

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On 5/7/2018 at 1:31 PM, batongal said:

Penny Serenade when he's pleading his custody case to the judge ?? that is some grade A acting. Became a fan after that.

This is in my top five favorites of his films. That scene with the judge is still very moving today and one of Grant's greatest moments on film. I like the way the film starts as romantic comedy, then gets into some family fun, (the scene where Grant is trying to keep the baby from crying is hilarious) and later the dramatic and tragic moments work equally well. 

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