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Max Linder


VP19
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Just saw the two shorts and the feature on TCM...quite enjoyable. I had heard a lot about Linder over the years, but this was the first chance I've had to see him, and I can see where he influenced so many other later comics. It's unfortunate he's not better remembered, although for some reason he never could muster favor among American audiences, and that and some personal factors led to his suicide in 1925.

 

Your thoughts on Linder? He reminded me a bit of Charley Chase, perhaps blended with a sort of silent version of William Powell's gentleman characters..

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VP19,

 

I have seen the short feature SEVEN YEARS BAD LUCK (1921) before, and I find it to be extremely funny. Max Linder was a very talented guy. Like Chaplin quite a dancer! The two early shorts, didn't show me a whole lot, but it's good to know that numerous others still exist that we have yet to see.

 

Seems that Linder's character was adapted almost verbatim by the highly under-rated American funny-man Raymond Griffith, who's character is a virtual carbon copy. Even dresses the same. Outrageous things seem to happen to Griffith's little sharp dressed man that are seemingly beyond his control, just like they did to Linder. The formula is almost exactly the same. Although Griffith may be somewhat more reserved.

 

Nonetheless, having seen five of Raymond Griffith's films now, I can definitely say that He was much better than Langdon, and should be rated ahead of Harry in my opinion! Griffith too deserves to be re-discovered!

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It would indeed be nice to see authorized releases of Raymond Griffith's films, but since most are owned by Paramount, I doubt that will happen any time soon. HANDS UP! is a very funny film, and it would be nice to see a nice restored 35mm print of it instead of the contrasty 16 mm versions that pop up now and then.

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Does anyone know if "The Kid" was dedicated to Max Linder? I noticed some similarities in the development of the story while watching "Seven Years Of Bad Luck". Both films have an elaborate dream sequence and I wonder who took the idea from whom in 1921. Anyway, the shorts were entertaining as the full film and I'm grateful to have seen them for the first time. Mr. Linder was a great physical comedian.

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Un petit homme brillant!

 

Little sunshine rays of genius, or sparkling gems, very European French sensibility that takes getting used to but isn't he absolutely distinctive from Chaplin, Keaton and Lloyd, yet all of them are there, clearly inspired by Mr. Linder. Never would have guessed at his tragic demise, Max looked like he would have enjoyed a long, joyful life, too bad...

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