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tonite....."role model....gene wilder" -- as interviewed by alec baldwin


cocodelaplaya
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alec baldwin......

 

mr. baldwin......~~

watching you in first half of this interview....

i was smiling with a grin that hurts my face even now....

you are so sweet in your rapture of mr. wilder

gene wilder......you and mr. gene wilder.

great job.

i clap and stand....reverently.......great---great job.

now-i observe....

as you sit next to mr. wilder

with your hands very still in your lap...your are feet crossed ~~yet,

your toes are up---slightly....

as if in check....

you are holding yourself tall, but in a relaxed attentiveness that shows

respect and interest.

i am so smiling at this.

you look like a boy.

sitting with your hero.

 

you are.

and i am a witness.

i see?

Respect and admiration.

Respect and an eagerness to learn

and know more about someone who has left a mark so deep in you....

that you realize that deep respect

by honoring him.....

and giving us a chance

--with you--

to learn about a genius who is sharing, wholeheartedly, his keen

 

""CLIFF NOTES"" **

~~~~~~~~~~~**(this should have lasted days.)

 

on a life in front of the camera.....~~unabashedly and without reservation.

 

 

watching you...i am thinking~~

...."what a lucky #%&@&%$ you are!!"

....and then?.....

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ i thank you in the same sentence!!!!!

 

i love gene wilder.

 

he has made me cry---- laughing----- on the night my father died.

the worst night of my life.

and yet?

it was a request from a man on his last days....

 

my dad asked us to watch his movies...

 

"blazing saddles" and "young frankenstein..."start the revolution without me"...

and we did.....the entire clan....

twenty-seven of us, together, on the night that he died.

a gene wilder marathon.

it was father's day.

yes.

my father died on father's day.

and

because my dad loved gene wilder ..... we watched those movies.....

and i laughed and cried as never before on that night.

 

seeing him tonight,

~~~ with you alec?

i remembered every second of that night, and how we loved gene wilder so much more for the joy he gave my father, and for the joy it gave my dad to share his amusement and enjoyment of a treasure like gene wilder ~~~with us.

 

gene wilder will always be a hero for me.

 

and because you did such a superb job tonite?

i feel even closer to not only gene....but my dad, too~~again tonite,

so thank you mr. baldwin.

 

 

love you alec,...if i may be so forward to call you alec...

.....but i am not a child...

and smiling i will tell you ~~~~?

i am forty-eight years ~~~~young!!!!

i say this because i want you to know the sincerity behind this

next comment.

 

mr. alec baldwin.....

~~~~~~~~~~ you rock in 3rd rock....

and oh yeah

one more thing?

oh -so-handsome man?

your instincts are spot-on ~~~~sir.....

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ comedy suits you to a "T"...

 

I AM ALL SMILES AND HUGS.....

THANK YOU FOR TONITE.....

GREAT JOB....

xxx

mr. wilder?

love comes to you every time i think of my dad.....

thanks for making him laugh harder than anyone......he adored your sincereity and purity.

it is rarely displayed as genuinely as you expressed yourself and with a committed and yes...sometimes "commitable" performance that brought tears and laughter to us in this

uncertain and sometimes cruel world.

i love you mr. wilder.

and i know it seems strange....i do not know you...nor have i met you.

but i do, love you, nonetheless.

cool isn't?

how you touch people?

you must feel so wonderful, knowing that:):)!!

 

i truly hope you see this.

from my heart---and with love~~~

 

god bless you and keep you safe.

you are a treasure to me and my family.

 

smiles and hugs always....

i am your fan....

~~~~~~~~~~~~

cocodelaplaya

aka

cheryl

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I thought the interview was great. The location was stunning. Is it a historic hotel or home in Connecticut?

 

I have loved Gene Wilder since I saw *The Producers* back in the late 1960s. "I'm wet and I'm hysterical!" is one of my favorite lines. I thought the chemistry that he and Zero Mostel had was just wonderful. I had no idea, or I've forgotten over the years, that he and Annie Bancroft were in a play together and that's how he met Mel Brooks.

 

He seems like such a gentle soul, very talented and very appreciative of the people he has worked with.

 

The big surprise for me was Alec Baldwin. I had no idea he could be such a good interviewer. He seemed in genuine awe of Mr. Wilder and he did his homework. He didn't make the interview all about himself nor did he try to impress Wilder or us with how much he knew ( which too often happens in these kinds of scenarios).

 

I knew he was a big fan of TCM's but had no idea that this interview would be this good.

 

I hope TCM and Baldwin plan to do more of them as I'm hooked.

 

Thanks to all involved and especially Mr. Wilder.

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>The big surprise for me was Alec Baldwin. I had no idea he could be such a good interviewer. He >seemed in genuine awe of Mr. Wilder and he did his homework. He didn't make the interview all >about himself nor did he try to impress Wilder or us with how much he knew

 

I too was impressed with Alec, although I've always liked him as an actor.

I thought his questions were great, some even surprised me, and I'm pretty jaded about the old typical questions.

My biggest peeve (aside from the word peeve itself) is interviewers trying to turn the spotlight around to themselves. Alec strayed into that but was pulled out before he fell.

 

Is there anything worse than watching a news interview and seeing the camera move to the interviewer nodding with concern?

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>Is there anything worse than watching a news interview and seeing the camera move to the interviewer nodding with concern?

 

Now that you mention it, probably not. When they trained the camera on Alec, he looked as if he was actually listening.

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I've watched the program twice (it's now available "On Demand") and I am now recording it for a TCM-less co-worker. I've enjoyed it more each time.

 

But I am now utterly curious about one of the credits at the very end of the program. There, along with all the producers, co-producers and "thank you's" to TCM execs there is a title card that reads (something like) -

 

"A special Thank You to James Farentino"

 

James Farentino? I wonder "why?" and what "role" the actor James Farentino had in this production.

 

Any ideas? Hypotheses? Wild Guesses?

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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Wilder was absolutely wonderful and Baldwin did a fantastic job. The Q&A was very engaging and the setting was perfect. A top drawer production all the way around.

 

I really love the idea behind Role Model. It seems to me that when an interviewer's life or career has been greatly influenced by the interviewee, there's a greater potential for rich and meaningful conversation.

 

I wish TCM would produce Role Model on a monthly basis. I could see it becoming a great TCM tradition.

 

Thanks TCM!

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> {quote:title=hlywdkjk wrote:}{quote}

> I've watched the program twice (it's now available "On Demand") and I am now recording it for a TCM-less co-worker. I've enjoyed it more each time.

>

> But I am now utterly curious about one of the credits at the very end of the program. There, along with all the producers, co-producers and "thank you's" to TCM execs there is a title card that reads (something like) -

>

> "A special Thank You to James Farentino"

>

> James Farentino? I wonder "why?" and what "role" the actor James Farentino had in this production.

>

> Any ideas? Hypotheses? Wild Guesses?

 

When they showed the clip from the television version of Death of a Salesman I thought one of the young men in the scene was James Farentino. Perhaps he's the one who had a copy of the film and they were thanking him for the use of the clip. Or something.

 

Di

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Diana:

 

You're right. Farentino was one of the sons (the other being George Segal.)

 

Overall I was pleasantly surprised at the show. (I also watched it on On Demand.) Baldwin seems a genuine fan. It is a pleasant conversation between two people who like each other. Those are the best kind. Gene seems genuinely happy.

 

Interesting stories about Brooks and Pryor are scattered through the discussion. They probably had more material they could have used for the show. It would have been fine by me.

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Di and 'movieman' -

 

I caught the *Death Of A Salesman* "link" last night too. That makes sense. Though it would be odd if CBS didn't have the clip and they had to approach Farentino for it.

 

In the program Wilder also alludes to having an impolite description of Joseph Levine but which he keeps to himself "out of respect". Anyone have some info on why that may be?

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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I caught the Death Of A Salesman "link" last night too. That makes sense. Though it would be odd if CBS didn't have the clip and they had to approach Farentino for it.>>

 

Kyle,

 

As the play was done for CBS back in 1966, it is possible that CBS in one of their vault cleaning exercises, threw out the film or the master.

 

CBS has a number of classic programs even on 2" inch video - I'm not sure if DOAS is on 2"inch, but if it was - their facility in Television City has the ability to transfer from 2" (one of the few remaining places that can by the way), so that's what leads me to believe they may have thrown away the elements and/or the master sometime in the past.

 

I would hope that UCLA Film and Television would have a copy (they have a number of the old Hallmark Hall of Fames from our childhood) but that is no guarantee.

 

It is possible that Farentino has the only copy.

 

Message was edited by: lzcutter for clarification

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Redriver,

 

Yes, Wilder was in the televised play from 1966:

 

Lee J Cobb was Willie Loman

James Farentino was Happy (Farentino was 26)

George Segal was Biff (Segal 32)

Mildred Dunnock played Linda

 

and Gene Wilder played Bernard, a character not related to the Lomans.

 

Message was edited by: lzcutter

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  • 4 months later...

I just saw a "60 Minutes" piece featuring Alec Baldwin, whom I guess is as much famous for his outrageous political statements as his acting. Not to mention a messy child custody/divorce case gone way too public.

I'm a fan of him as an actor. He's got leading man looks but chooses the character stuff.....and I like that in an actor, always have.

Any way, I drug up this old thread just to say, he just seems like a passionate guy with a lot of charisma. No matter what I think of his politics, he seemed pretty regular to me.

I gotta tell you, his scene in "Glengarry Glen Ross" is very intense. I like him in all his recent character roles. And I can see after this "60 minutes" thing that the likable Alec Baldwin from the Wilder interview is not "an act".

It just struck me, so I posted it.

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"Well, he has gotten older and heavier ... not exactly "leading man" material now. Take a look at him in his prime in The Hunt for Red October - he looks great there."

 

OH yeah, no doubt. One of the little tidbits that came out in the 60 Mins piece was that he was offered "Patriot Games", ie, the franchise role after "Red October". Instead, he turned it down to do "Streetcar Named Desire" on Broadway, which always begs the Brando comparison, a risky move for a screen actor. Anyway, he spoke of how he preferred "character parts", and never even remotely second guessed turning down the "Jack Ryan" franchise, which was successful. All in all, it was a nice piece on Baldwin, and it pulled no punches on his "big mouth" politics, and the dirty little phone message. He still came out seeming like a fairly decent guy, maybe a hothead that might want to think before he speaks. Although it seemed like that unafraid "irreverence" is probably a big part of his charm on better days.

It was interesting.

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>scsu1975 wrote:

> Well, he has gotten older and heavier ... not exactly "leading man" material now. Take a look at him in his prime in The Hunt for Red October - he looks great there.

 

Older and heavier?! I'd still be ecstatic if he played in one of my screenplays. I'd tailor for him. Great acting is great acting.

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Since this has turned into a Baldwin appreciation thread, I'll add I too am a big Alec Baldwin fan. I think he's still handsome, and as always, a great actor that brings a lot to his roles. His mother lives two towns over in Baldwinsville, no lie.

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