Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
mr6666

Animation News- (a Genre or a Medium?)

Recommended Posts

Brad Bird Says Animation Is Finally Being Respected as a ‘Viable and Vital Medium’ at Variety’s 10 Animators to Watch

".........Bird addressed the misconception that animated films are only meant for children, causing animators’ work to be “relegated to a second tier apart from the rest of filmmaking.”

“I don’t like [animation] being considered a genre or separate,” Bird said. “I think that we’re an amazing method of telling a story and that we should be respected as such.”

He said animation is now being seen as a “viable and vital medium to tell stories” to moviegoers of all ages...........

http://variety.com/2018/film/news/brad-bird-animation-10-animators-to-watch-1202804093/

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, mr6666 said:

Brad Bird Says Animation Is Finally Being Respected as a ‘Viable and Vital Medium’ at Variety’s 10 Animators to Watch

".........Bird addressed the misconception that animated films are only meant for children, causing animators’ work to be “relegated to a second tier apart from the rest of filmmaking.”

“I don’t like [animation] being considered a genre or separate,” Bird said. “I think that we’re an amazing method of telling a story and that we should be respected as such.”

He said animation is now being seen as a “viable and vital medium to tell stories” to moviegoers of all ages...........

http://variety.com/2018/film/news/brad-bird-animation-10-animators-to-watch-1202804093/

I agree that it is a medium and not a genre.    

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why Animation Is the Hottest Genre at Cannes’ Market

A glut of animation projects points to a new independent industry mantra: Family entertainment

 

".........With Warner Bros. and Sony firing up animation as a major priority, six of Hollywood’s seven major studios are now investing heavily in animation, releasing two or even three toon features a year. These companies don’t just have the deepest pockets. They also boast a formidable arsenal of globally known franchises — from the Incredibles to Shrek to any other cuddly creature that can be counted on to adorn lunch boxes and T-shirts, as well as inspire toy lines.

Buyers are exceedingly cautious about indie titles as a result. Unless they are “on a par in quality, highly original and entertaining,” independent animated features suffer “fierce competition” from Illumination, Pixar, DreamWorks, Disney titles, said Ivan Boeing, at Brazil-based distributor Imagem.

“Brand creation for independent [animation] movies is hard – period,” said Martin Moszkowicz, at Germany’s Constantin Film. One reason: the difficulty of creating a worldwide-coordinated marketing campaign with many independent distributors in many countries.

Another challenge, Moszkowicz said, is that to a certain extent, quality comes with a steep price tag. That can be harder to justify because a film’s profitability depends increasingly on its box-office haul. Rich television broadcasting deals are harder to come by. DVD sales have largely evaporated and can’t be relied on to cushion the blow from disappointing theatrical revenues.

So far the appetite for toons is undiminished...........

http://variety.com/2018/film/festivals/animation-cannes-fireheart-missing-link-1202805624/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think animation is a medium.  I think it's unfair that animation is instantly deemed a children's film, which relegates it to a lower status among film.  

There are animated films geared toward children, but there is also animated film geared more toward teenagers and adults.  The Studio Ghibli films are a good example of this.  The animation is gorgeous, but these films also feature more complicated and innovative storylines than many of the more kid-oriented animated fare.  I do like that for the most part, Disney/Pixar creates films for the whole family, not just children.  When my husband and I go see animated films in the theater, yes there are kids there, but there are also many adults there sans children.  

At this point, so many films rely so heavily on CGI for their imagery and special effects, that I'd be more apt to classify those films as a hybrid live-action/animation than straight live action.  I'd love to see an action/fantasy/sci-fi film where the filmmakers actually had to make use of trick photography, models, etc. to create special effects and not resort to the computer and a green screen. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a medium, although it's a medium that's predominantly used for a specific genre, that of children/family films. But it can obviously be used for any type of film, and it has, by one country or another. It's a different set of tools, used in different ways, than traditional filmmaking. They share some rules, obviously, but the requirements and restrictions are different enough that I personally always consider animation and traditional film (now digital) live action as separate entities. It's also why I approve of animation having a separate category at the Oscars.

I also agree with Speedracer's comments about modern CGI films blurring the line. I thought while watching Avengers: Infinity War that there didn't seem to be a single shot that didn't have at least some digital effect on screen, and much of the film took place in space or on alien worlds that were largely CGI. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you kidding me here???

And here I thought this whole "issue" had been finally put to rest back in 2009, and when the movie Up was not only Oscar nominated for the Best Animated Feature Film(and which it won), but also Best Picture.

(...the first ever animated film to be so, I believe)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Are you kidding me here???

And here I thought this whole "issue" had been finally put to rest back in 2009, and when the movie Up was not only Oscar nominated for the Best Animated Feature Film(and which it won), but also Best Picture.

(...the first ever animated film to be so, I believe)

Beauty and the Beast was nominated for Best Picture 18 years earlier.

And what are you so incredulous about? I'm assuming it's something intensely felt, since you used 3 whole question marks, which I can only visualize as :

oGl3d.gif

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Beauty and the Beast was nominated for Best Picture 18 years earlier.

And what are you so incredulous about? I'm assuming it's something intensely felt, since you used 3 whole question marks, which I can only visualize as :

oGl3d.gif

LOL

Wait a minute here, Lawrence! 

After all this time, THIS was the first time you've noticed me using more than ONE punctuation mark at the end of sentence?...oh wait...???

Dude! I would have thought by now you would have known I do THAT sort'a thing a LOT around here?!!! Including of course, a whole lot of words that I uppercase in order give them emphasis and/or a sense of "inflection" within my text!!!

 ;)

First, thanks for setting the record straight as to the first animated Best Picture nominee. And secondly, yeah, in a way I WAS attempting to sound "incredulous" as to this subject(the subject of animated films still being generally thought of as primarily "children's fare") was still somehow being a "debatable" one, and now days with the general consensus being that anyone who still feels this way is pretty much out of step with present said general consensus.  

(...oh and finally, no...you can rest assured that in no way do I ever react like that long-haired freaked out dude that you just gif-ed here ol' buddy, and regardless the number of punctuation marks I may or may not include within my posts) 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

But it can obviously be used for any type of film, and it has, by one country or another.

Two words: tentacle erotica.

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

;)

Some guys might use a different spelling of "tentacle"!  :D

and...   !!!  so, THERE!!!  ;)

Yeah, I've always considered animation to be a MEDIUM (but too, once RARE...  ;)  ) and not a genre.  And actually, I do believe Walt Disney intended his earlier animated "classics"  like SNOW WHITE and et al, to be intended for all ages and not just children.  Especially FANTASIA, which took more time for children to warm up to.  And, since animated films like RANGO, BEAUTY AND THE BEAST and HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON cover different GENRES, it's clear that animation alone is NOT just a genre.

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about Disney's early Classic Animated Features such as "Snow White, "Fantasia", "Bamby"?  I see them as telling a  grand story. They were originally meant for Children but over the years people of all ages embraced them.

In the case of "Fantasia", it is both entertainment and an ART FORM with its revolutionary use of music and animation that defied tradition.  He used    Leopold Stratavinsky in one of the pieces. I see it as an ART FORM that never can be matched.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It only became a "Genre" when Dreamworks tried to put out two a year, now that they thought stealing Pixar's act was "easy".

And then when everyone else at Fox, Sony, China, and a dozen other struggling other little animator-studio startups thought imitating Dreamworks was "easy" ("Madagascar" and the Ice Age movies are a lot more popular in other non-English-speaking countries than in the US), it became one cliche' to write the exact same script over and over.  And nothing creates a "genre" than default cliche'.

Now, of course, Dreamworks has gone out of business, and ding-dong the Ogre is dead, so Brad's feeling nice and confident again about good CGI movies.   I still feel as if I'm going to be disappointed by Incredibles 2, though, as "Unemployment", "Career marital troubles", and "More demon-baby" weren't top on my list of what Cool Stuff we were going to get in that sequel after fifteen years.  ? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Beauty and the Beast was nominated for Best Picture 18 years earlier.

And what are you so incredulous about? I'm assuming it's something intensely felt, since you used 3 whole question marks, which I can only visualize as :

oGl3d.gif

That looks an awful lot like Bernard Bresslaw of the Carry-On series...

Bernard%20Bresslaw%20%20Carry%20On%20At%  2b1c70a7760a39a37ebf7ba3290e63ad.jpg

As for animation - it's a medium that can have genres. Unless you have a non-animated film, which has been made in a cartoonish manner (along the lines of what speedy wrote), in which case you might be able to argue that it's been made in an animation style, or genre...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jon Favreau Made An Animated ‘Lion King,’ But He Still Doesn’t Want You To Call It An Animated Film

 

 

Jon Favreau, the director of Disney’s 100%-fully animated remake of The Lion King, is claiming in a new interview that he doesn’t think the film should be considered animated.

If you’re confused, don’t worry. That’s part of Disney’s marketing strategy.....

Virtual production is an innovative filmmaking technique that can be used in the service of either a live-action film or an animated film. You can read our in-depth explainer of the technique here. It is, however, still a technique (akin to stop motion, hand drawn, cinematography, or cg). The final imagery that appears in any film can only be classified as one of three things: live action, animated, or a hybrid combination of the two.

In the case of The Lion King, the imagery is 100% animated, achieved through a combination of virtual production and cg animation techniques. .....

 

The Disney studio has been on a years-long campaign to recreate its animated films as live-action product. All of its other live-action versions have had live-action performances in them, even if they incorporated plenty of animation, too. Clearly, being honest about The Lion King would complicate the marketing of the film, and would put the studio in a defensive position of explaining why they made an animated remake of an already animated film.

Further, it’s no secret that commercial animation in the United States carries a negative association with children’s content, which is ironically an association that has formed due to Disney’s own outsized influence in the industry. An animated film that breaks the mold and has a more mature sensibility is a tougher sell to the general public than simply re-labeling something as a live-action film and avoiding the stigma of being labeled a children’s film.

If The Lion King were accurately labeled as an animated film, it would also create a headache for the company during awards season..........

https://www.cartoonbrew.com/ideas-commentary/jon-favreau-made-an-animated-lion-king-but-he-still-doesnt-want-you-to-call-it-an-animated-film-175028.html

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hope this helps(from the CAMBRIDGE English dictionary)---

genre

noun [ C ]
 UK  /ˈʒɑ̃ː.rə/ /ˈʒɒn.rə/ US  /ˈʒɑːn.rə/formal

a style, especially in the arts, that involves particular set of characteristics:

What genre does the book fall into - comedy or tragedy?
 
So I'd say, if ANIMATION is a "genre",  then so are literature, music AND movies "genres" too!  ;) 
 
Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cartoon BrewVerified account @cartoonbrew Jun 22

 
 

Ron Howard To Direct ‘The Shrinking of Treehorn’ For Paramount Animation:

It's one of four upcoming animated and hybrid features being developed as part of a partnership between Imagine Entertainment and Animal Logic.

Ron Howard, 65, is set to make his animation directorial debut with The Shrinking of Treehorn, an adaptation of the 1971 children’s book by Florence Parry Heide.

The surreal story about a boy who starts shrinking was originally illustrated by Edward Gorey, and Howard is said to be following Gorey’s aesthetic, even if the film will be made in cg. It will mark the first film in a partnership between Howard and Brian Grazer’s Imagine Entertainment and the Australian animation studio Animal Logic (The Lego Movie franchise, Happy Feet). Imagine and Animal Logic initiated the partnership back in 2017.

“I’ve long had this passionate point of view that Ron Howard should make a tentpole animated movie. That’s how this started,”.......

https://www.cartoonbrew.com/feature-film/ron-howard-to-direct-the-shrinking-of-treehorn-for-paramount-animation-176159.html 

D9rZ5SZW4AI2y0N.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a medium. I wouldn't consider Mickey Mouse and Fritz the Cat to be the same "genre." 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

It's a medium. I wouldn't consider Mickey Mouse and Fritz the Cat to be the same "genre." 

Sounds like you never saw that one movie Mickey did freelancing for another studio that one time back in the mid-'70s when his contract had lapsed with Disney and before re-signing with Uncle Walt's concern, eh Gf?

Yep, it was a much raunchier and updated 1970's version of Steamboat Willie, his first big triumph, titled Mickey's Willie Returns: Bigger and Better Than Ever, and with the "Willie" in THIS case referring to...well...I'm sure you get the picture here.

(...and so at least in this ONE case anyway, it COULD be said that Mickey AND Fritz did INDEED share a "genre")

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, mr6666 said:

Cartoon BrewVerified account @cartoonbrew Jun 22

Ron Howard To Direct ‘The Shrinking of Treehorn’ For Paramount Animation:

Never mind that it's from the director of the Jim Carrey "Grinch", it's from the screenwriter of Sony's "Peter Rabbit".

Speaking of those who consider animation a "Genre" that was invented by Jeffrey Katzenberg...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course its a medium. In that medium you can have different techniques and genres.

Say you got Bugs Bunny cartoon set in the West. Bugs and Yosemite Sam are the actors and would be a Comedy Western. Just like Way Out West with Laurel and Hardy is a Comedy Western. Raph Baskshi's Lord Of The Rings was an Adventure Epic, Bakshi's Fritz The Cat was an Adult Toon, his Coonskin was a Blaxploitation ficlk, but the technique was inked frames and rotoscope. Disney did the Legend of Sleepy Hollow a light Ghost story all inked frame. Mr. MaGoo's Christmas Carol was a Musical drama. The Rabbit of Seville is a Bugs Bunny Warner Bros. Looney Tunes Cartoon that was an Comedy Opera. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

© 2019 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...