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Seeking copy of Hollywood Revuew of 1929


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Mark your calendars, set VCR's, DVR's, whatever---

Monday, August 4, 6AM EST!

*THE HOLLYWOOD REVUE OF 1929* will be airing as part of Marie Dressler's fine "Summer Under The Stars" day! And a fine day it is too!!! GREAT lineup! Dig it!

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Thelma and all,

You know I fully support the concept of a "Roaring Twenties" month, totally! Love it! I would, however, suggest perhaps expanding it to include perhaps 1930, even 1931, those very early primitive talkies and I feel that much of the style and tone of the 20's is still there in those early talkies and pre-codes. It would also allow TCM the opportunity to have a slightly broader choice of talkies. I love silents, but even 1929 was such a mixed year, it limits the choice of talkies for the month long celebration. I would love to see it on the scale of the Musicals and Comedies months a couple years ago, where films of the month's theme appear on THREE days per week, instead of just one or two.

Rock on!

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Everyone,

 

Some more neat stuff! Here is a great number "PAGAN LOVE SONG" from the hybrid Silent THE PAGAN (MGM, 1929) Starring Ramon Novarro, Beautiful Dorothy Janis, and Renee Adoree! TCM does air this film from time to time.

 

If I recall correctly, In the film, I believe that it is really Novarro, and Janis voices heard singing the song??? This version one of several on Youtube, is by the Victor Salon Orchestra. Despite what it says in the Video intro, there is no talking in this movie. Only the song. Every hybrid Silent in 1928-'29, seemed to have at least one song with lyrics as part of it's synchronized track.

 

pls-1.jpg

 

 

 

And here is the title tune of EVANGELINE (United Artists, 1929). This version is by Harold "Scrappy" Lambert.

 

Scrappylambert-1-1.jpg

 

 

 

Message was edited by: gagman66

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TCM aired "The Show of Shows" (1929) about ten years ago...it was aired during a "history/salute to the American Musical month." It's runs just over two hours long and the film exists in black & white (originally in technicolor). However one original technicolor reel (about 9 minutes long) was found & restored and inserted into the existing black & white film. It's the "Chinese Fantasy" sequence and looks beautiful in early technicolor. I think "The Hollywood Revue" is a bit more entertaining/fast moving. Yet "Show of Shows" is a more lavishly produced film...lots of large production numbers. It's an ok film from the dawn of sound.

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Everyone,

 

A couple films that I am not finding on anyone's list are Allan Dwan's STAGE STRUCK (Paramount, 1925) with Gloria Swanson. And R. Willaim Neill's THE VIKING (MGM, 1928) with Pauline Stark. These were filmed entirely in 2-Strip Technicolor. Both films were nicely restored some years back, I have them on DVD-R. Ed, siad that when He saw STAGE STRUCK at George Eastman House in 2006, that it was virtually pristine!

 

THE VIKING has been shown on TCM in the past, and it retains it's Vintage Western Electric track. STAGE STRUCK is important, because it's one of the earliest surviving Technicolor features, not to mention it's Major Star in Swanson, whose best Silent films have largely not been all that accessible to us.

 

Colleen Moore's IRENE (First National, 1926) also had a full-reel of Technicolor footage that needs restoration, as does the film. Even though this title has slipped into the Public-Domain, that does not necessarily mean that Warner's doesn't have the best print around stashed in the vault someplace?

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By the time THE VIKING was made the Technicolor process was no longer projected in a literal 2 strip process like it was when THE BLACK PIRATE (1926) was made. Yes, there were two color negatives made by the camera, but the "new" process was a cousin to the later IB process first used by Walt Disney in 1932. When THE BLACK PIRATE was shown, the film was literally two strips of film cemented together (in registration) to show its limited color spectrum. When THE VIKING was made, that process was changed and release prints were only one strip of film, but still using the two color spectrum. Which is why the technically correct term for the Technicolor process used from about 1928 to the introduction of the 3 strip IB process in 1932, is "two color Technicolor".

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Scottman,

 

Yes, and so many of the Two-color Technicolor sequences to films of this period have been lost! That's why THE VIKING is an important feature! STAGE STRUCK was 2-Strip Technicolor though in 1925. Released before THE BLACK PIRATE, so another significant film. Plus it is a very good movie!

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Thelma,

 

I love Corinne Griffith, but Dorothy Janis was the leading lady in THE PAGAN. She was wonderful in that film. Speaking of Corinne though, can you find a original recording of "WHAT MY LIPS CAN'T SAY FOR ME" from THE GARDEN OF EDEN? Robert Israel used the tune in his own score wisely, but it was also a part of the lost original Western Electric track in 1928.

 

I am also looking for a good recording of "JOSEPHITA" from TIDE OF THE EMPIRE with Renee Adoree. I have the movie, just no recording of the song.

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Hi Jeffrey,

Yes, it's sad,but true, a lot of the late 20s and early 30s two color Technicolor is lost.

It would be nice to see the "Happy Days Are Here Again" finale from CHASING RAINBOWS (1930),or the finale to GOOD NEWS (1930), but until some one turns up the color elements, we will not be able to enjoy these films as audiences did in 1930.

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I agree Scott.... those would be terrific discoveries. In Rchard Barrios' book about the birth of the musicals, he has an appendix that lists the early musicals that are missing their original color sequences. For some, as you mentioned, the sequences are totally lost; for others we at least have B&W versions.

 

SWEET KITTY BELLAIRS was apparently shot in 100% Technicolor but the film exists now only in B&W and still worth a look.

 

I believe all of the color sequences for the Duncan Sisters' IT'S A GREAT LIFE survive and considering that the film was a flop, this is surprising. Marilyn Miller's first film SALLY has all its color sequences in tact also..... I think.

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Thelma,

 

Fine by me, as I am a very big Colleen Moore fan! Anything that you might be able to find is certainly appreciated!

 

I am still hoping that TCM will premier the newly restored 1927 Moore feature HER WILD OAT before the end of the year.

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