Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Seeking copy of Hollywood Revuew of 1929


Recommended Posts

lzcutter,

 

If the economy and WHV Budget cuts are to blame, why doesn't Warner's just come out and say so, rather than giving us empty promises? Personally, I don't buy it. There are plenty of titles already restored and scored that have not been released.

 

Likewise there may be several others that we haven't seen, as they have yet to debut on TCM. For instance, two recent restorations include King Vidor's PROUD FLESH, and Colleen Moore's HER WILD OAT. We also know that Lobster Films and David Shepard's Film Preservation Associates are busy restoring Vidor's BARDELY'S THE MAGNIFICENT at this time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

lzcutter,

 

If the economy and WHV Budget cuts are to blame, why doesn't Warner's just come out and say so, rather than giving us empty promises? Personally, I don't buy it. They seem to still be putting out allot of other stuff. There are plenty of titles already restored and scored that have not been released.

 

Likewise there may be several other projects that we haven't seen, as they have yet to debut on TCM. For instance, two recent restorations include King Vidor's PROUD FLESH, and Colleen Moore's HER WILD OAT. We also know that Lobster Films and David Shepard's Film Preservation Associates are busy restoring Vidor's BARDELY'S THE MAGNIFICENT at this time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have several movie heralds from the 1920s and earlyu 1930s. I got these about 15 years ago.

Among the lot is one for Lon Chaney's LAUGH CLOWN, LAUGH, also for the Richard Barthelmess 1930 talkie THE DAWN PATROL. I have seen them around, butr they have gotten very pricey as of late. I have also turned up a couple of theatre heralds froM 1930 that advertise what that theatre was showing that week, films such as SWEETIE, WHOOPEE!, GOOD NEWS, and THE SILENT ENEMY, among others.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I found a site (vintagefilmbuff.com) that sells DVDs of restored films that include some Paramounts not for sale by the studios. This site appears to be legitimate and not a bootlegger - it's been around for some time. These are the films I found there that are of interest to me that fall under the time period we've been discussing.

 

Underworld (1927) - silent directed by Josef Von Sternberg, won first Academy Award for original story

Bulldog Drummond (1929) - Ronald Coleman's first talkie

Dangerous Curves (1929) - Clara Bow & Richard Arlen talkie

True to the Navy (1930) - rare Clara Bow musical

For the Defense (1930) - William Powell & Kay Francis

Street of Chance (1930) - another William Powell & Kay Francis pairing

New York Nights (1930) - Constance Talmadge's first talkie

Playboy of Paris(1930) - Early Maurice Chevalier

The Canary Murder Case (1929) - early William Powell talkie

The Virginian (1929) - early Gary Cooper Western

City Streets (1930) - Robert Mamoulian gangster film

One Romantic Night (1930) - Lillian Gish's first talkie

Devil's Holiday (1930) - Nancy Carroll nominated best Actress

 

These all appear to be Paramounts except "Bulldog Drummond" and "One Romantic Night". Sam Goldwyn produced "Bulldog Drummond" and UA produced "One Romantic Evening". The thing is, they are pretty pricey - fifteen to twenty dollars per disc. However, if they are restored and this site is legitimate, that price is probably on target. I'm not trying to spam here, but since some of these are the long unseen Paramounts I thought this information might be of interest.

 

Thelma, I know my youtube posts are welcome. Thanks for saying so, though.

 

gagman - I would love to respond to your private message if I had the first idea of how to find the thing! How do I find and receive my private messages?

 

I found a youtube post of parts of "Paramount on Parade", the studio's version of the all-talkie revue. However, it is truly awful. It looks and sounds like somebody recorded it with a videocamera slung over their shoulder aimed at the TV. Even the poster apologized for the quality.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I went back 23 pages and couldn't find these exhibited.

 

I've previously posted clips of Charlotte Greenwood with Buster Keaton. Here's one of my favorite films from the 30's although it is a little past the cut off date of this thread (1931). "Palmy Days" is set in an art-deco style bakery "Glorifying the American Doughnut".

 

Here's the opening number, a lively tune named "Bend Down Sister". Seeing this opening number back in 1979 on late-night TV introduced me to precode film.

 

BenDownSister.jpg

[bend Down Sister|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXBb80VAXm0]

 

 

Here Charlotte Greenwood, the gym instructor in charge of the physical fitness of the Goldwyn Girls, mistakes Eddie for a suitor predestined by a fake fortuneteller. Reminiscent of the scene between Greenwood and Keaton.

PalmyDays-m.jpg

 

[Greenwood chases Eddie|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckWWjYsza3o]

 

 

 

Next, the president of the bakery mistakes Eddie for an efficiency expert also falsely predicted.

[Eddie is hired as an efficiency expert.|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VsBlN0-e-gE]

 

The president of the bakery shows Eddie around the bakery followed by a great musical number.

[The best musical number of the 30's IMHO|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJ4pRjVWefM]

The music starts 1:40 into the clip, but the first part is amusing too.

 

Here Eddie dresses in drag among the bakery girls to hide from gangsters.

PalmyDaysDrag.jpg

 

Here are some clips from 1930's Whoopee. The Great Depression killed Technicolor films for awhile, but they were still being made by this point.

[Title Song|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANRPmTZRqkg]

[My Baby Just Cares for Me|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-EXfxLitAo]

 

The reason that so many films' Technicolor Sequences are missing - "Chasing Rainbows" for example - is that the negatives were stored by the Technicolor corporation, not the studios. In the late 1940s, most were discarded by Technicolor in a space-clearing move, and the studios had never claimed the material since the Great Depression and the motion picture code had removed the old color musicals from the memory of both the studios and the public.

 

It's a shame that Eddie's films aren't on DVD. He was a great entertainer. Speaking of Charlotte Greenwood, she is one of many entertainers recruited from Broadway and vaudeville at the advent of talkies. She made "So Long Letty" for Warner Bros. in 1929 as her talkie debut.

[My Strongest Weakness|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QP6ru-SVTMA]

[My Beauty Shop|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z8yZDtlr3Hg]

The film has excerpts on the laserdisc set "The Dawn of Sound" but is not available as VHS or DVD.

 

She was cast against type in both appearance and age (She was 39 when she debuted in films). The studios didn't care at this point, they so badly needed talent with talking experience. I'm glad they didn't care, because she is fun to watch.

Link to post
Share on other sites

calvinnme,

 

Grace McKee was selling a version she restored of 7th HEAVEN on Ebay very recently. Maybe she is not marketing it on her own site yet? I have not been there in several months. Is CITY GIRL still there? Maybe Fox stopped her from selling these as there has been talk of official Murna, and Borzage collections?

 

I have just started responding to your PM. I will answer you shortly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Murnau's "City Girl" is there, as I believe were several other Fox films from the early 30's. I believe I heard that Fox is planning to market Seventh Heaven and Street Angel very soon (we've heard that one before haven't we???) so they very well could have shut Grace down on that one.

 

Even the advertisement for "City Girl" made it look somewhat unappealing. It said the studio interfered with Murnau's choice of lead - he wanted Janet Gaynor - and gave me the idea it could have been a troubled production. Is it a quality silent?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, CITY GIRL Starring Charles Farrell, and Mary Duncan, was filmed mainly in 1928 as OUR DAILY BREAD. Though not released until 1930, and without Murna as CITY GIRL. Still a Silent hybrid. The film was downgraded by Fox from a major production to a B-picture. Only the Silent version from '28 still survives. It is an excellent movie. And Duncan is wonderful. If Fox is releasing Murna, and Borzage sets this film should definitely be included in the mix. Mary Duncan is memorizing in Frank Borzage's THE RIVER also opposite Farrell.

 

I would do Hand stands if an official DVD release of 7TH HEAVEN were to be issued by the end of the year! Even more so for STREET ANGEL. Guess, I'll believe it when I see it? I just hope they keep the vintage Movie-tone tracks! Otherwise, it's just not going to be the same. I never thought in a million years that 7TH HEAVEN might actually beat THE BIG PARADE to DVD! Incredible if this turns out to be so!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thelma,

 

Hey, the posters,and lobby-cards are great! Sure you are Welcome to use the ones that I sent you as well.

 

DESERT NIGHTS (1929) is missing a good reel, it was longer than 62 minutes, but that is all that survives today. Making it a 6 reeler now, rather than a 7 reel feature. This picture was probably closer to 75 minutes in original release, maybe even 80? This is the same running time as Harold Lloyd's THE FRESHMAN at 7 reels.

 

DESERT NIGHTS is a very underrated film, Ironically, I just watched it again over the weekend! I enjoyed it very much. TCM last aired the movie in either 2005, or 2006. I'm not sure which? There are a few swift jump-cuts due to the missing footage, but it holds up quite well. A surprisingly good film for Gilbert's final Silent. The only other movie I have seen with Mary Nolan is Lon Chaney's WEST OF ZANZIBAR (1928).

 

Ernest Torrence must have worked for most every studio in town all at the same time? I have seen him in First National pictures, Warner Brothers, MGM, Paramount, Universal, United Artists, you name it! Ernest is there! I wonder how on earth He was able to do this??? The guy must have never run out of energy?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...