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Werewolf of London (1935)


nosound
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Here is a movie I dusted off this weekend to view. It stars Henry Hull and Valerie Hobson and is one of the "forgotten" universal horrors, rarely seen anymore. A very enjoyable film as the plot continues to flow throughout, no flat spots or dragging scenes.

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My late father told me this movie was the only one that really scared him. He was about 15 when he first saw it.

 

Henry Hull's makeup for me is much more frightening than Lon Chaney, Jr.'s in THE WOLF MAN.

I love the two Cockney landladies, and Warner Oland gives a memorable performance.

 

I remember the plant -- the "mariphasa lumina lupina" Or something like that.

 

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I like this movie, too.

 

The only part of it I could do without is the subplot where Lester Matthews keeps trying to move in on Hull's wife!

 

I don't know that I prefer the makeup to THE WOLF MAN but I do like it.

 

Great scene with Spring Byington becoming ill at the sight of a plant eating a frog!

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You know, I could see those two landladies in their own series, getting involved in all aspects of their tenants life, and commiserating drunkenly on those stairs. What were their names -- Mrs. Moncaster and Mrs. Whack?? Perfect!

 

I remember that scene with Spring, lol, and also when she's on the balcony with Dr. Yogami (Oland), and they hear a scream. "What is it?" she asks nervously. "Maybe a lost soul" says Warner.

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I agree that "Werewolf of London" has been underrated over the years. Werner Oland and Valerie Hobson gave good performances, and some of the scenes, like the opening werewolf attack in Asia, are very good. However, the two Cockney women got on my nerves very quickly.

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nightwalker,

 

That was a great magazine! I started getting it around 1968-69, somewhere around issue #50 and I still have them all! Famous Monsters was renowned for printing still photo's of classic horror deleted scenes, they were great. One that sticks in my mind is when they printed the pics of the men being attacked by spiders or something after King Kong knocked them off the log. The log scene is famous but the bottom of the canyon scene went to the cutting room floor and never appeared on film. If not for the still pics we never would have known?

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I actually don't remember reading about that in FM with the landladies.

 

I had a full set of FM's as well as a modest collection of rare Bela Lugosi stills.

 

I sold the mags and the stills at a horror con and made some good money!

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OMG -- what a great site, all those FM covers!! What memories they bring back.

 

I think no. 22 had an interview with Lillian Arch, Bela's fourth wife, but I can't remember now.

Something about how they went back to Budapest and Bela ordered goulash or stuffed cabbage but they didn't have enough paprika in them, so he sent it back to the kitchen. Lillian said he could eat moe stuffed cabbage than anyone else she knew.

 

That also could have been the issue with the Carroll Borland interview, where whe wants to start smoking, but Bela tells her not to. Then later she lights up and a (real) bat flies near her home and she takes that as a sign from Lugosi not to smoke. (he didn't think "ladies" should, and she was a teenager then and wanted to live it up)

 

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I remember seeing this film one summer day in an air conditioned movie palace. When we left, we got hit with a 100 degree hot humid day. We thought we were in Hell. LOL the one scary part for me was when Henry Hull's character feels a change coming on and the cat screams, and for some reason the opening scene when the other werewolf bites Hull.

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Werewolf of London was one of my early memories of a horror film on TV. I watched it on our families old Zenith B&W TV. The scene with Hull and Oland in the mountains at the beginning scared the he** out of me. I still prefer 1941's The Wolf Man, but enjoyed seeing Werewolf of London again after so many years. It's a very good film.

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