Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Sundance said:

The Spanish version was made in the evenings somewhere near the desert which included the use of armadillos. For the English version, the same set was used in the day including the armadillos which Browning approved.

The bottom photo of the crawling insect that LawrenceA posted

could be found in the California desert as well.

 

 

 

 

Maybe armadillos had some special significance for Browning. But they still look humorously

 out of place in Dracula's castle, not that this does any damage to the overall film. I would

have gone with hedgehogs myself, but to each their own.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/30/2018 at 4:43 PM, CaveGirl said:

Thanks, Ray but I just don't buy it.
 

You know what - NEITHER DO I! I just ran the clip and it's a voice double. The resonance is definitely stronger and less chipped than Greenstreet's. But he got the lisp right, which is what fooled my memory. Looks like I stuck my chin out and got clipped!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree that it doesn't sound like Greenstreet to me either. Maybe we'll never know for sure.

Not to change the subject, but I just checked out Greenstreet on Wikipedia. The Maltese Falcon was his first film and he was 62. Prior to that he was a a stage performer in England. His film career, though very prolific, only lasted eight years. I'm sure most of you already knew that but I didn't. I think he's one of the best character actors of that era. 

I'll be back as soon as I think of another "mystery". You guys and gals are really good.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/31/2018 at 4:57 PM, Sundance said:

Lugosi played the vampire in "Abbott & Costello meet Frankenstein".

719911422_ScreenShot2018-05-31at3_51_02PM.png.8b739148885ce52c99370e1f142a227a.png

And I thought vampires did not cast a reflection in

the mirror. 

It's more than possible that producer Arthur, Director Barton and even screenwriters Lee & Rinaldo weren't aware of the no-reflection issue. But I wonder if Lugosi mentioned it on the set when they were shooting. In any case, doing the scene without a reflection would have been an expensive composite matte shot that would have added thousands to the budget. The only way to have done it cheaply would have been to have had the camera on Bela and Lenore and then slowly panned over to the mirror with Lugosi dropping out of the shot so that only Aubert would be seen in the reflection. In any case, this has caused no end of consternation to horror fans over the years. Oh well.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/1/2018 at 6:14 AM, Ray Faiola said:

You know what - NEITHER DO I! I just ran the clip and it's a voice double. The resonance is definitely stronger and less chipped than Greenstreet's. But he got the lisp right, which is what fooled my memory. Looks like I stuck my chin out and got clipped!

You didn't stick your chin out...just expressed a sensible explanation which would convince most normal people.

I, on the other hand, am not normal! Like for example, when the nuns would talk about how horrid Doubting Thomas was in the bible, to question if someone was risen from the dead, I would always get up and say "But isn't he the only sane one of the Apostles, to find that circumstance not convincing unless he actually sees the person supposedly risen?"

So thanks for actually checking it out and giving some possible credence to my belief that it does not sound like Greenstreet. Much appreciation, Ray!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/31/2018 at 11:12 AM, Hoganman1 said:

Here's another one. Why do they show an armadillo in the Bela Lugosi film "Dracula". My understanding is they are not native to Eastern Europe. That's always caught my attention when watching that old horror flick. I guess we'll never know for sure,

Never thought about that one, but I do enjoy seeing the creepy crawly things in "Dracula" during the crypt scenes. Would never have known they are not native to EE, so thanks, Hoganman! Of course, there would probably be given a explanation just like they used to do in Superman comic books and the mail bag questions like:

"Dear Mail Bag, 

In the last issue, DC #53, Superman was staring at Lois Lane's breasts on Page 9 and panel 4, and his glasses did not melt, nor did his X-ray vision burn a hole in her sweater, and why not?

Johnny Craig"

And the DC Mail Bag would answer with something like this:

Dear Johnny,

That was not really Superman in that panel art, since you missed that he had been hit by Red Kryptonite and a double from the Bizarro world had taken his place, not wearing glasses constructed from the windows in baby Superman's original spacecraft from the planet Krypton. Hope that helps, Johnny!

Superman's Editor for the Smallville Mail Box"

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/30/2018 at 5:37 PM, jimmymac71 said:

I too would know "Don't Let Go" was not Elvis. I cheated and looked it up. Roy Hamilton. So, who actually sang "All American Boy?" If it is an over-dub, good thing they weren't trying to cheat Bogart or Lorre. This was before Rich Little's time. When listening on headphones, and once again, this isn't a movie I know very well, the voice in question sounded a wee bit British or something similar. Greenstreet, to me, sounded like a cigar smoker, while the other voice was cleaner. I want to believe the voice was added later, as it sounded more like directly talking into the microphone, like when someone sings in a movie and you know it was done in a studio setting.

Really good one, on that AAB record question, Jimmy! I might be hallucinating but I think Bob Dylan covered it on one of his bootleg, Basement Tape albums on those Pig or Swine labels. I think my older brother used to play it occasionally but I could be wrong. I wonder who got the royalty checks if not Bobby Bare?

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/31/2018 at 11:21 AM, Hoganman1 said:

Ha, I never thought of that, but it sure makes sense. I thought I was the only one to notice these obscure, but questionable details in movies. Most people don't pay attention or simply don't care. I'm glad to know there are others like me. 

All those who are this detail oriented on movie stuff, need to stick together, Hoganman!

Maybe we should start a website, called "Delineating Filmic Details" or at least the more crass, "Essential Yet Unimportant Movie Trivia for Addicts"?

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/31/2018 at 5:20 PM, Vautrin said:

Maybe armadillos had some special significance for Browning. But they still look humorously

 out of place in Dracula's castle, not that this does any damage to the overall film. I would

have gone with hedgehogs myself, but to each their own.

Honest to Gloria Blondell, I love all movies of Tod Browning. His love of carny folk and ability to show them as people and not objects, in films like "Freaks" and all his other wonderful classics, is testament to his character in my book. Love his absolute fondness for the seeming weird and outre, and general mien at producing such distinctive films, unlike any others of the time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

Really good one, on that AAB record question, Jimmy! I might be hallucinating but I think Bob Dylan covered it on one of his bootleg, Basement Tape albums on those Pig or Swine labels. I think my older brother used to play it occasionally but I could be wrong. I wonder who got the royalty checks if not Bobby Bare?

All American Boy Songfacts:
http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=33940

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

Honest to Gloria Blondell, I love all movies of Tod Browning. His love of carny folk and ability to show them as people and not objects, in films like "Freaks" and all his other wonderful classics, is testament to his character in my book. Love his absolute fondness for the seeming weird and outre, and general mien at producing such distinctive films, unlike any others of the time.

I haven't seen too many of Browning's films, just a couple of his "talkies." Browning spent some

time as a carny in his younger days, that's probably why he was interested in that environment.

He definitely had a unique perspective, armadillo-wise. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

All those who are this detail oriented on movie stuff, need to stick together, Hoganman!

Maybe we should start a website, called "Delineating Filmic Details" or at least the more crass, "Essential Yet Unimportant Movie Trivia for Addicts"?

We could co-author a book called "Weird Movie Trivia for OCD Sufferers"

Also, have you ever wondered why Dr. Frankenstein is referred to as Victor in Mary Shelley's novel, but Henry Frankenstein in the Colin Clive/Boris Karloff film? By the time Peter Cushing played the role in the Hammer version he was back to being Victor.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/2/2018 at 11:25 PM, Vautrin said:

I haven't seen too many of Browning's films, just a couple of his "talkies." Browning spent some

time as a carny in his younger days, that's probably why he was interested in that environment.

He definitely had a unique perspective, armadillo-wise. 

Far be it from me to advise you on seeing any of his films, Vautrin but I really think you might enjoy some of his silents, like "West of Zanzibar" with Chaney and Lionel, and "The Unknown" with Chaney, as Alonzo the Armless and Crawford due to their most exquisitely bizarre storylines, which are a bit perverse yet mesmerizing. Also the "Unholy Three" [both versions] and even "The Show". Browning had a unique take on tales a bit outside the normal vein, which made his films very enticing. "West of Zanzibar" is so outre I don't think they would even be able to make it today, as it would probably be banned. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 years later...
On 6/3/2018 at 11:39 AM, Hoganman1 said:

We could co-author a book called "Weird Movie Trivia for OCD Sufferers"

Also, have you ever wondered why Dr. Frankenstein is referred to as Victor in Mary Shelley's novel, but Henry Frankenstein in the Colin Clive/Boris Karloff film? By the time Peter Cushing played the role in the Hammer version he was back to being Victor.

The names were switched in the Peggy Webling  Play, in the late 1920's.  Whoever decided on the change must have thought the name of "Henry" sounded more "up-to-date"

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Iris10 said:

The names were switched in the Peggy Webling  Play, in the late 1920's.  Whoever decided on the change must have thought the name of "Henry" sounded more "up-to-date"

Thanks, Iris10. It took 3 and a half years, but I got an answer. I see you're new to the forum. Welcome and enjoy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/31/2018 at 3:57 PM, Sundance said:

And I thought vampires did not cast a reflection in

the mirror.

You can see for yourself in the top pic he's not supposed to be. But somebody forgot in the next shot, it appears.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...